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How do you get a foam fly to land correctly?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 kevin24018

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 01:47 PM

My searches have not come up with anything.  Maybe too broad a topic.  When you cast a foam type fly, grasshopper type for example, how do you get them to land right instead of upside down or something?  Just luck?



#2 fshng2

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 02:07 PM

Place most of the foam on the side of the hook shank you want to float up and it will float to that side.
In addition trim spikey material from the bottom like hackle points, or excessive dubbing.

Lastly check your design in a pan of water.

Post what you finally tye if you still have questions, and someone here can help.



#3 samsonboi

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 04:08 PM

My theory is it looks crippled or in trouble if it's on its side, so a fish might hit it better. Just a theory. I don't think the fish cares which way it lands. Charlie Brooks did what he called "tying in the round" where the fly was about the same on every side, the theory basically being that a fish can only see one half of the fly at once if it is roundish, so you can make each side the same and it doesn't matter. That was aimed more towards nymphs but also works with dries. So I would say that often times it does not matter.



#4 mikechell

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 06:32 PM

As fshng2 said, as much foam as possible on the "up" side.  But the hook bend and point is the "keel".  If it hangs down, it's the weight.  I've found, often, that my foam flies tend to twist line while casting.  No matter what side it lands on, it will roll over a few times as I twitch the line.  If there's not TOO much twist, it will finish hook point down.  If there's too MUCH twist, it just keeps rolling.  I get a lot of hits when the fly is rolling like that, so I too, don't think the fish care much which way the fly lands.
 
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#5 DarrellP

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 07:31 AM

If it lands upside down, pop it and it will usually right itself.
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#6 niveker

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 08:31 AM

 

I've found, often, that my foam flies tend to twist line while casting.  No matter what side it lands on, it will roll over a few times as I twitch the line.  If there's not TOO much twist, it will finish hook point down.  
 

 

 

If it lands upside down, pop it and it will usually right itself.

 

In my experience, this is it in a nutshell.  One quick pop and it flips over, then it's time to let my line unwind.   

 

Also, when tying, make sure your non-buoyant and water absorbing material is on or below the plane of the hook, or at least blow the foam sections.  .  



#7 Philly

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 01:06 PM

I think everyone has covered it..  Usually if one lands on it's back, a pop or two will right it.  One thing that I find helps is to use a heavier hook.  I'll use a straight eye streamer hook, rather than a dry fly hook for some of my foam bugs..  


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#8 redietz

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 07:22 PM

Sometimes, just giving your line a short tug at the end of your cast, before the fly hits the water, will help as well.


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#9 tidewaterfly

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 03:38 PM

I try to tie them a little undersized for the hook and use a hook style that will help keel them better. I had bought a couple of big foam adult stoneflies tied on size 2 or 4 long shank streamer hooks. They looked great, but I ended up cutting most of the wing off so they would land with the hook point down, or roll over if they did land on the back side. 

 

They were top heavy the way they were tied and probably could have been better on a larger size and heavier hook. I was using them for bass too, so a hook with a wider gap would have been fine. 

 

Even the heavier leader & tippet I was using with my 8 wt didn't help. They still landed on the backs 9 times out of 10. 

 

I don't have too any problems with the small foam flies, like beetles, only the big ones.