Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

gear management


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 jsigmon

jsigmon

    Bait Fisherman

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 24 January 2004 - 11:43 PM

I am a novice fly fisherman with 2 rods/reels. I readalot about different leader/tipets anf fly lines for different conditions. As a former bass fisherman with spinning gear I would have 5-6 rods ready for any condition . When flyfishing, how do you organize gear? Do you have a single rod and a few different reels each with different combinations of line/leader and switch them out as conditions require? Do you go out with single rod and reel for the day and hope for the best. I ask in terms of wade fishing not boat fishing where you can store all the gear in the boat.

Thanks

JS

#2 steeldrifter

steeldrifter

    When I grow up, I'm moving to Florida !!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,763 posts

Posted 24 January 2004 - 11:50 PM

When i wade fish i usally will take 2 rods and leave one in the truck,i will take the rod that i will be using during the day usally my 4 wt and i carry a couple of spare spools for the reel with me. Buying a few spare spools can be a bit costly though so 1 spare spool with a sinking line and the spool on the reel with a floating line is really all that is needed.

The other rod i keep in the truck is usally a 6wt that i will go get before dark to fish the bigger flies and or streamers with.

With a floating and a sinking setup ready to go you can simply target the depth in between the 2 lines with longer/shorter leaders and split shot or indicators.

And you are right having a boat makes us a bit spoiled becuase i keep 3 rods rigged and ready all the time in the boat wink.gif

SD

mcfr.jpg
Owner- Steve Clark
Midwestcustomflyrods.com


Better to have a short life that is full of what you like doin, than a long life spent in a miserable way- Alan Watts
 
 
 


#3 Shoe

Shoe

    Bellied up to a Sand Bar

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,181 posts

Posted 24 January 2004 - 11:52 PM

I've solved that problem by buying extra spools. One will have a floating line and the other is a sinker or sinktip.
Most of the time I'm in a boat and additional rods aren't an issue. Those are pre-rigged with streamers, nymphs and dries. However the hole presents itself, I'm ready and loaded for bear.

BTW, welcome to the site smile.gif
I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.

#4 jsigmon

jsigmon

    Bait Fisherman

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 24 January 2004 - 11:56 PM

Gentlemen,

Thanks for the reply. Very helpful. I'll look into the add'l spools and take your advice on the setup..

Thanks

JS

#5 Shoe

Shoe

    Bellied up to a Sand Bar

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,181 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:05 AM

JS,

Allow me to add just a little insight.
It is very difficult to compare "tournament style" bass fishing and fly-fishing, especially for trout. Instead of throwing the kitchen sink, fly-fishing is more of an "observance sport", at least to me. Instead of throwing several different flies and jumping right into the drink, I observe the river for a few minutes and see what's happening. Look at spider webs in bushes for last night's hatches. See what's crawling on the rocks and look for feeding fish. By doing just that, you'll get an idea of how to maximize your potential. At that point you can also figure out if the fish are feeding in lanes or if you need to fish the froggier water for neutral/negative fish.

This may be second nature to the seasoned flydunker, but it's not all that appearant to the novice. Fly-fishing is a fun way to become one with your surroundings and a much slower pace than beating the water to a froth with hardware.




I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.

#6 J. Johnson

J. Johnson

    Don't talk to me, I got a good drift!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 885 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:55 AM

I think it all depends on your style of fishing and what type of water you plan to fish.

I usually have an idea what to expect before I go out. 95 % of my Fly Fishing is done with a floating line. So I have no need to carry extra spools of fly line.
I do have a sinking tip system that I can add on to my fly line if I need to get down in a deep pool. As for leaders, most of my trout fishing is done with a 9 foot 5x tapered leader. Other than a couple of hand tied leaders to midge fish. I carry 5x and 4x mono and fluorocarbon spools of tippet. I do keep a back up rod and reel in the truck just in case one malfunctions.


The word "angling" is the name given to fishing by people who can not fish- Stephen Leacock

#7 Big Daddy Hubbard

Big Daddy Hubbard

    President of the North Alabama Steelhead Assoc., Hogswaller, KY

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,393 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 02:53 PM

being a vet of the wading waters of the South, the best advice I can give you is to do your homework...know the water you are fishing, its eco system and life cycles, the water conditions if possible.....be prepared to adjust your approach for any given condition...and smile....everyday on the water is a learning experience!

I realize what a broad genearlization this is, but with a little experience, you will come to understand! Wish I could be more helpful, but the best rigs you can use are your powers of observaiton and a working knowlegde of your own capabilities! I look forward to helping you along as best as I can! Tight lines!

#8 Live2Fish

Live2Fish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 151 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 09:01 PM

Carry a 3wt, 5wt and 7wt in the truck. Each has a spool with floating and sinking line on it.
Fishing is at once the ultimate quest, the ultimate joy, the ultimate frustration. And anglers wouldn’t have it any other way.