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Natural Dun Float


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Byron

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 05:06 PM

I'm a bit reluctant to post this, but here goes:

 

It has been my experience of observation, over many, many years of fly fishing that, IN GENERAL, before taking flight, duns tend to float downstream "facing downstream".  Granted, many times currents and micro currents change their drift, but that is why I say "In General".

 

If I my observations are correct, that is why I tend to fish either downstream to fish, or, at the least, sort of across and down in order that the fly will, in its float, be oriented to floating wings first headed downstream.

 

Agree or disagree?

 



#2 Flat Rock native

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 05:22 PM

I'm a bit reluctant to post this, but here goes:
 
It has been my experience of observation, over many, many years of fly fishing that, IN GENERAL, before taking flight, duns tend to float downstream "facing downstream".  Granted, many times currents and micro currents change their drift, but that is why I say "In General".
 
If I my observations are correct, that is why I tend to fish either downstream to fish, or, at the least, sort of across and down in order that the fly will, in its float, be oriented to floating wings first headed downstream.
 
Agree or disagree?


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#3 Bruce Norikane

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 06:52 PM

Agree, that's how naturals seem to float.

 

Although picky trout sometimes prefer a downstream presentation.



#4 mikechell

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 10:26 PM

Since the flies have no "rudder" or other steering mechanisms except their wings, I don't actually agree with the downstream orientation theory.  If there's no wind, then it might be true, given the passage through the air on the current would turn them downstream.  

Given any wind stronger than the downstream speed, and the fly will be turned headfirst into the wind regardless of current direction.


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#5 Crackaig

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 07:11 AM

Not sure I follow your reasoning. Presuming that you are making a straight cast, not messing around with complex currents the fly will float downstream tail first from a downstream cast. The leader would have to hook around to give you a head first drift. The fly being "tethered" from up stream.  Whereas with an upstream straight cast the fly would land and float downstream head first.

 

There is another factor to consider as well. Which way are the fish facing? For the most part they face into the current. Is it better to approach a fish from a position where the fish can not see you, or stand in his line of sight?

 

There are times when fishing downstream works well, but they tend to be the exception rather than the rule. The major reason for fishing downstream is so that you can shuffle your feet, dislodging the insects, and creating a trail of, effectively, bait, to fish your fly amongst. An approach which will see you thrown off most waters here.

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#6 Bruce Norikane

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 10:36 AM

Not sure I follow your reasoning. Presuming that you are making a straight cast, not messing around with complex currents the fly will float downstream tail first from a downstream cast. The leader would have to hook around to give you a head first drift. The fly being "tethered" from up stream.  Whereas with an upstream straight cast the fly would land and float downstream head first.

 

...

 

True. On a downstream cast the tail will go first, unlike a natural. However, downstream casts are sometimes the best or only way to pick off a picky trout.  Some believe the downstream cast is better because the fly is seen before the tippet or line. 

 

The point is, wing first presentation is more like a floating dun, but downstream sometimes works better.