Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Do all Ephemerellidae nymphs hatch slowly?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Randyflycaster

Randyflycaster

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 248 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 09:40 AM

If not, do any of these hatch quickly?

(I'm preparing an eastern hatch chart.)

Ephemerella: subvaria, dorothea, invaria, guttulata.

Thanks,

Randy

#2 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,753 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 01:45 PM

Are you asking about time from egg to adult ... or time from hitting the surface to breaking out of the shuck?


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#3 utyer

utyer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,335 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 03:03 PM

Or maybe the time from the beginning of the emergence of a given species to the end of that emergence.  A population of subvaria will take two or three weeks to emerge once they have started.  Many other species will have a more compressed time frame, and some will have a longer time frame.  In different locations, these hatches (same species,) will take place earlier or later depending on latitude, elevation, and other climate factors. A few species will hatch over a span of months rather than weeks.  

 

Most individual insects that hatch in mid stream, will do so rather quickly.  Some genera like Isonychia crawl out of the water on rock (like stone flies,)  


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#4 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,753 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 03:07 PM

Or maybe the time from the beginning of the emergence of a given species to the end of that emergence.

OH ... total time from the first bug to hatch to the last bug to hatch ... got it.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#5 Randyflycaster

Randyflycaster

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 248 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 03:53 PM

I mean from hitting the surface and breaking out their shucks.

I remember reading somewhere that Ephemerellidae nymphs hatch laboriously.

Randy

#6 rockworm

rockworm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,375 posts

Posted 11 May 2014 - 04:08 PM

This depends mainly upon the temperature of the water and air. And when its cold the newly emerged dun may float some distance before taking to the air.