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Opinions about multi fly set ups


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52 replies to this topic

#31 j8000

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 10:57 AM

Here is my general opinion on a wet fly set up.  Two is my most favorite number of flies to fish wet flies with.  I like them about 18" apart and the dropper on a very short tippet as others has said, say form 3" to 8".  usually start with 8" then as I change the dropper it gets shorter.  This set up works well for me with a bit of variety and still excellent control.  Only on occasion do I have trouble with the dropper and in such areas I still start with the two flies, but with the difficulties I usually loose the dropper at some point then I just don't replace it and continue on with a one fly set up.  Sometimes I'll fish three flies, but with the added difficulty I generally don't unless I'm fishing on a calm day on calm water such as a lake.

 

The thrill of catching a double is good and with different flies one can have a better chance to see what the fish are preferring.  The only draw back I have is if I keep switching from a dry fly to a wet fly, then I either have a second rod near by or just keep to a single wet fly set up.  Or as discussed above, when the waters are too treacherous for my skill level for fishing more than one fly at a time without frustrating problems.

 

Jeff



#32 redietz

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 08:59 PM

The purpose of multi-fly rigs is to fish in different parts of the water column. Not to get multiple fish on one rig. That would likely end badly anyway, you wouldn't have two for very long. I much prefer one fly at a time and only resort to two if I'm having trouble thinking like a fish.

Actually, it seldom ends badly.  I land most of the doubles that I hook (most recently yesterday), and when I don't it's because one becomes unbuttoned as I'm netting the other.  I've had doubles on land locked salmon with each fish over 20"; it's just not that hard to deal with.  

 

You're right about different parts of the water column, but there are other reasons:

 

1) You give the fish a choice: different sizes, different colors, etc

 

2) One fly can act as an attractor while the other seals the deal.  It was amazing how often it would happen that I would be consistently catching on just one fly, cut off the other thinking I didn't need it, and then suddenly stop catching.  Putting back the second, seemingly non-productive fly, would pick the catching right back up.

 

3) It's the only way I can think of that lets me fish one fly just above the water (other than right under my rod.)

 

I can think of no good reason to not always fish two flies -- the maximum allowed  in my state.


Bob


#33 j8000

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 10:39 AM

Bob, that's a good point on No. 2 I never thought of before, but the theory makes logical sense. 



#34 Sandan

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 11:56 AM

 

The purpose of multi-fly rigs is to fish in different parts of the water column. Not to get multiple fish on one rig. That would likely end badly anyway, you wouldn't have two for very long. I much prefer one fly at a time and only resort to two if I'm having trouble thinking like a fish.

Actually, it seldom ends badly.  I land most of the doubles that I hook (most recently yesterday), and when I don't it's because one becomes unbuttoned as I'm netting the other.  I've had doubles on land locked salmon with each fish over 20"; it's just not that hard to deal with.  

 

You're right about different parts of the water column, but there are other reasons:

 

1) You give the fish a choice: different sizes, different colors, etc

 

2) One fly can act as an attractor while the other seals the deal.  It was amazing how often it would happen that I would be consistently catching on just one fly, cut off the other thinking I didn't need it, and then suddenly stop catching.  Putting back the second, seemingly non-productive fly, would pick the catching right back up.

 

3) It's the only way I can think of that lets me fish one fly just above the water (other than right under my rod.)

 

I can think of no good reason to not always fish two flies -- the maximum allowed  in my state.

 

 I agree with all your points.  3 flies here in CO. but I usually fish two dries rather than three. 3 nymphs just about all the time. Even when fishing streamers I'll drop something off the back.  



#35 FishnPhil

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 02:28 PM

I tried 3 flies once or twice but at today's prices, losing >$6.00 per rig every time I break them all off, it became cost prohibitive :D



#36 redietz

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 02:49 PM

I tried 3 flies once or twice but at today's prices, losing >$6.00 per rig every time I break them all off, it became cost prohibitive biggrin.png

Many people on this forum tie their own.

 

Seriously, this can be a concern.  I usually use tippet material one or two X finer to my point fly than to my top dropper, so that if I snag it, I only lose one instead of two.


Bob


#37 tjm

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 06:41 PM

"The purpose of multi-fly rigs is to fish in different parts of the water column. Not to get multiple fish on one rig. That would likely end badly anyway, you wouldn't have two for very long."

 

Two dry flies are covering the same part of two different water columns as are two wets on the swing, with the hopper dropper it's been explained to me that the dry is a strike indicator-so only one part of a water column is fished with the "dropper" (which is actually the point fly)

I've seen several fish on one line with baited droppers and never was there a problem with them getting off, or fighting or whatever. Hand lines,  limb lines, trot lines and commercial long lines all are based on the idea of multiple fish on one line.  Not long ago some one mentioned that Lee Wulff caught three fish on a three fly streamer set up for a movie/video.

Three wets or three streamers across and down  is the only way that I would currently fish multiples and they would all be on heavy tippets. 



#38 Sandan

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 06:48 PM

Let's not miss using multiple flies allows us to imitate multiple food choices for the fish.  A dry and an emerger or a BWO and EHC.  A hopper/dropper or baetis nymph, caddis larva and stonefly. 



#39 DFoster

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 10:21 AM

Well It happened, I finally "doubled".  On Sunday I was fishing for the last of the stocked browns on a the river behind my house.  The water temp is rising and the stocked trout are starting to disappear.  I was casting a two fly set with a #14 black spider on the point and a #12 olive scud as a dropper 18 inches apart.  One particular cast landed 2 blue gill one on each fly, a first for me.  It was an interesting experience.  There was the adrenaline rush at first I thought as I thought I had hooked a good size brown which was followed by some disappointment seeing I had a blue gill followed by excitement with the realization I had two fish on the line. 


And you thought golf was frustrating-


#40 FishnPhil

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 10:55 AM

Rollercoaster of emotions DFoster, hah!

Lots of great info in this thread regarding multi fly rigs. Just when I read a post that makes me think, this is it, a read another that is "it" also. Covering multiple depths, multiple fly species, multiple stages of a hatch, indicator-less, all good stuff and all accurate in different situations.

#41 xvigauge

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 11:27 AM

Here in the GSMNP no more than two flies are allowed on one leader at a time, so three fly rigs are out. Also, the two flies must be no less than 12" apart. I have heard that the 12" rule has never been enforced or even questioned; but then again, why would one want their flies to be closer than 12" anyway?

Joe



#42 Sandan

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 01:26 PM

Here in the GSMNP no more than two flies are allowed on one leader at a time, so three fly rigs are out. Also, the two flies must be no less than 12" apart. I have heard that the 12" rule has never been enforced or even questioned; but then again, why would one want their flies to be closer than 12" anyway."

Joe

The only reason I can think of is fly#1 catches the fish's attention, he hit's fly #2.  Personally I like about 12-13" between flies. I think it gives better control of the dropper's depth.  2 flies, nymphs, got the job done on the San Juan this past weekend. In the morning a red annelid and a midge nymph or emerger in the afternoon that same annelid and a baetis nymph or emerger were the tickets.



#43 chugbug27

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 04:47 PM

I'm a little late to the party here...
I do use two or even three flies on a rig at times, but I do truly prefer one fly.

2 or 3 fly rig = 2x or 3x:
Guessing not figuring
Exploring not placing
Chucking not casting
Dragging & snagging not drifting
Tying & untangling not fishing

Sometimes guessing and exploring makes sense, but for me it's usually when I'm feeling puzzled, overwhelmed or defeated... Which is not the best time to spend time taking care of and inevitably (for me) untangling or losing a three fly rig!
cb27

#44 Charlie P. (NY)

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 09:24 PM

The only time I have tried multiple flies is when lake fishing with minimal gear.  I sometimes put a nymph (typically a chronomid) on a dropper tied to the bend of a hopper.  

 

Nothing against the concept - I have enough trouble keeping just one fly in control on streams.  And rivers I generally use larger flies.


   Not that Pearsall

 

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#45 Crackaig

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 05:31 PM

This all seems rather strange from here. If you were to hit pause and count the how many flies each fly angler had on his cast at any point across the countries of the UK you would probably get an average of two point something each. Most common would be three. Almost all still water competition fishing is done with 3 flies. Most anglers on the lochs will have three flies on. A few may have four. Probably a higher number will have two than four.

 

North country wet flies (the original soft hackles) were traditionally fished in casts of ten or more flies, though the norm these days is three. The various techniques that could be labeled together as  "modern nymphing" use a minimum of two flies, frequently three. Again the average would be over two.

 

Using a single fly is usually reserved for the few dry fly only streams, usually, but not always, chalk streams (spring fed). The real reason for the restriction is they wouldn't want some northern oik to arrive and literally hoover up all the fish.

 

That is why it sounds so strange that this debate is even happening. It is accepted fact that a team of flies fished together amounts to more than the sum of its parts. At least here it is.

 

Cheers,
C.


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