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"Webby" Hackle

Webby?

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10 replies to this topic

#1 TimKil38

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 02:06 PM

I've been fly fishing for many many years, but just got started into tying.   I've seen tying directions that call for "webby" hackle but I can't find a definition for what that means.  A large fly tying catalog has a product that says a hackle is "semi webby."  I'm starting with woolly buggers since that's the fly I lose the most.  



#2 phg

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 03:17 PM

Woolybuggers are generally tied with saddle hackle.  Other than Whiting's and Metz's genetic hackles, most saddles will be webby enough.

 

Web refers to the part of the feather where the barbs have distinct fuzziness, rather than the clean, well defined single strands found on dry fly hackles.  All hackles get webby near the base, but some are webbier than others.  Chinese and Indian saddles are what one usually uses for woolybuggers and the like.



#3 phg

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 03:28 PM

Here is a good illustration of various hackles. http://www.eflytyer....s/feathers.html

 

All of the top row, and the bottom row, from the blue feather to the right, are webby hackles.  For a woolybugger, the feathers on the bottom row, from the blue feather to the right, will all work well.  The last one on the right, the schlappen, may be too webby for smaller 'buggers.



#4 SilverCreek

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 05:24 PM

This is type of saddle hackle you want.

 

w_whwbp_1.jpg

 

 


Regards,

Silver

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#5 flytire

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 05:32 PM

1-4-oz-Strung-DYED-BROWN-SADDLE-HACKLE-5

 

look for strung hackles


The fish care less than we do!


#6 waltersty

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 10:19 AM

Here is a good illustration of various hackles. http://www.eflytyer....s/feathers.html

 

All of the top row, and the bottom row, from the blue feather to the right, are webby hackles.  For a woolybugger, the feathers on the bottom row, from the blue feather to the right, will all work well.  The last one on the right, the schlappen, may be too webby for smaller 'buggers.

This is an awesome link.  Thanks for the share!



#7 vicente

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 11:31 PM

You can buy Ewing saddle hackle from sportsmans warehouse for about 20 bucks I've been using them for buggers and they have been great.
http://www.sportsman...42457/cat125109

#8 notenuftoys

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 09:36 AM

Strung saddle hackle is usually pretty cheap ($6/pack or so).  A step up in quality would be the Ewing or Whiting Bugger Pack.  But I've tied a ton of buggers on strung saddle.



#9 vicente

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 09:52 PM

I have a whiting bugger pack as well, those ewing I linked give you a lot more feathers.

#10 guitarplayingfishingguy

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 09:29 AM

I am an intermediate tyer and do not worry so much about what kind of feathers I use (yet) as long as they are the right size/color. As you develop your technique and get a good grasp of the basics you can build on it and start to gather more "proper" materials. For now, I often still use lower grade feathers for nymphs, streamers and dries (especially parachutes) and I still catch fish. For buggers I use cheap strung saddle and the fish haven't complained yet! This guy was caught on a Para Adams that was tied with cheap hackle. After the first couple fish the fly did not want to stay on top but they still hammered it anyways.

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#11 David 82nd

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:17 PM

Tim. You may want to look at " Feather emporiums web site , this guy has a break down on every feather that's been on a bird , he literally list birds A-Z there uses and what parts of the bird are used for specific types of flys , there's birds on there I never knew existed , good read and very informative, I've done some orders with him and did fine , pretty informative site , just my 2-cents