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How much does a large muskie fly weigh when wet?

Muskie Fly

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19 replies to this topic

#1 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:43 AM

I am green as grass and have decided I want to catch a muskie on my fly rod.  I have caught a few muskie on conventional tackle but not very many and no giants.

 

I want to tie a practice fly because I really need to work on my casting.  What size and approximate weight should I tie?

 

I like to search first and post last, I can't seem to find the search function.  



#2 flyguy613

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:27 AM

Don't attempt to make a fly a certain weight, consider the length of fly you want to tie then make proportions correct while keeping weight as low as possible. Even with a 12 weight fast action fly rod, a 12 inch fly tied bulky will cast terribly, especially in any high wind scenario. The goal is to create a fly that is pleasurable to cast all day long, has the action and profile when underwater to get a musky to follow and commit to the eat.

#3 Bimini15

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:39 AM

Look for videos by Andreas Andersson, Niklaus Bauer and Gunnar Brammer to see how to tie big profiles with little bulk and weight.
Bimini15

#4 mikechell

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:54 AM

As stated above, go ahead and tie a reasonable pike/musky fly.  I've practice casts with a regular fly hundreds, maybe thousands of time during my life.  But I don't throw anything as large as what you're wanting to use.

 

If you're wanting to practice with a real fly, after tying one up, cut the hook half way around the bend.  You can, then, get it wet and actually cast with the proper weight, etc.

 

Some flies ... like the ones Capt Bob tied on post #7 on this thread:

http://www.flytyingf...showtopic=86627

 

Are very light ... even when wet.


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#5 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 11:01 AM

Steamboat, what fly line do you intend to use?



#6 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 05:20 PM

Steamboat, what fly line do you intend to use?

I primarily use Orvis Depth Charge.  I can't remember how many grams.  Billy Wilson at the Orvis Store in Louisville ordered it and put it on the spool.  I have a 12 wt saltwater rod from Cabelas with one of their reels.  I have an additional spool with Cabelas floating line that I rarely use unless fishing shallow or top water.



#7 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 05:30 PM

Attached File  practisefly1.jpg   119.04KB   0 downloads

As stated above, go ahead and tie a reasonable pike/musky fly.  I've practice casts with a regular fly hundreds, maybe thousands of time during my life.  But I don't throw anything as large as what you're wanting to use.

 

If you're wanting to practice with a real fly, after tying one up, cut the hook half way around the bend.  You can, then, get it wet and actually cast with the proper weight, etc.

 

Some flies ... like the ones Capt Bob tied on post #7 on this thread:

http://www.flytyingf...showtopic=86627

 

Are very light ... even when wet.

Here is what I was using for practice today.



#8 mikechell

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 05:42 PM

How'd that work out for you?  Did the practice session go well, or do you have knots on the back of your head from fly impacts?


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#9 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 06:15 PM

How'd that work out for you?  Did the practice session go well, or do you have knots on the back of your head from fly impacts?

It went fine, I had to duck a few times.  I am primarly working on getting good loops, trying to double haul and increase my distance.  If my piggy bank allows, I want to take a trip this fall.  I haven't decided where, but if I decide to spend the money on a guide, I probably should learn to cast.



#10 ben bell

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:27 PM

as far as weight goes it depends on the material..naturals absorb water almost like a sponge..i make deer hair bugs that weigh about 60 grains dry but weigh 150 grains when wet..that,s 10 grams or 4 lincoln head pennies..lol.

#11 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:07 PM

I probably should have asked what size practice fly would be best.

I tied a large Game Changer style fly and when it is wet, it is extremely difficult to hoist it out of the water, so weight was on my mind.

#12 mikechell

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 10:46 PM

Here's my thoughts on two items that have come up.

First ... practice weights.  I can only relate this to weapons training.  You always, and I mean ALWAYS train with heavier weights than you plan to swing.  Chop at sturdier targets than you plan to hit.  For your purpose, the heaviest fly you plan on throwing at Musky and Pike ... that, at least, is what  you practice with.  Then you'll know the characteristics of the heaviest, and everything lighter will stay above your head.  Just remember, you throw the line, not the fly.  Flies that are more resistant to airflow change your cast more than heavier weight flies.  Heavier just hits you, air resistance slows the line down.

 

Second ... You mentioned that you don't use the floating line much.  I am not speaking from experience, just from what I've seen and read.  Most Pike and Musky fishing is done near the surface.  Shallow water, big flies and usually, fast retrieves.  Distance and depth aren't required as much as covering water quickly.  Fan casting short distances is how I understand it.  They aren't spooky, they chase any commotion near the surface.

 

I truly hope you get your trip, and it's an experience of a lifetime.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#13 Steamboat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 11:30 PM

I use the sinking line below Mcalpine dam from the Indiana side and the tail water of green river Reservoir near Campbellsville KY. Both have varying amounts of current and the sinking line does better in current.

#14 mikechell

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 11:34 PM

Got it.  wink.png


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Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#15 tjm

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 04:22 PM

Sinking line is always going to make pick ups hard, at least they do for me. In my streams I use full floating line and add shot if I need to get the fly down faster.