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Questioning Reality


7 replies to this topic

#1 FishnPhil

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 09:40 AM

Ok, time for your tin foil hat discussions, examples of us living in the matrix, or just plain crazy, odd, or whatever relatable content would like to share smile.png

 

Growing up, I remember all of these cliche sayings like, curiosity killed the cat, and, blood is thicker than water, as examples of life lessons, words to live by, etc. Then one day I'm on the interwebs and came across a statement that these so called life lessons were, in fact, not the entirety of the sayings. Furthermore, not only are these partial sayings, but they have been twisted to mean the exact opposite of what they actually mean!!

 

 

Curiosity killed the cat. Teaches us not to be curious when the entire saying is actually, Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back. 

Blood is thicker than water. Teaching that the bond of blood (aka family) is stronger than chosen bonds (love and friends). However, the entire saying is, The blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb.

Great minds think alike. I love this one, yes great minds think alike, and fools seldom differ.

Jack of all trades, master of none. Teaches us to become specialized and focused on becoming masters of single things. The entire saying is, Jack of all trades, master of none, but better than a master of one. 

 

Just a few of the examples that I remember off the top of my head. 



#2 Flicted

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 09:58 AM

You need to go fishing.



#3 mikechell

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 03:14 PM

Your examples, Phil, have nothing to do with "questioning reality".  Not "Matrix" type reality, anyway.

 

I've never had a nightmare.  Not all of my dreams are ... pleasant ... like being at work with the proper cloths on, but I've never woken up in sweats, or fearing to look under the bed, etc.

But, I HAVE had dreams that were so real, I've woken not knowing where I was.  Real enough for me to, momentarily, wonder if I HAD a dreaming or was still dreaming.  Mostly, this was during the early years of my traveling, in hotel rooms.

 

Other than that, I don't have anything "taken on faith" ... I only believe what I can directly experience.  No ghost, no E.T.s, no Bigfoot, etc.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#4 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 07:35 PM

Interesting...I didn't know that any of those sayings were fragments of longer ones that meant the opposite (or at least something different) from their current meanings. An example of how idioms and the popular notions that they encourage change over time. Thanks for sharing. :) 


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#5 tjm

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Posted 16 June 2019 - 06:24 AM

Half (or less, or more) of the words we use every day have changed their meaning in my life time. Just take "gay" as a starting point and the list is endless.

 

So, " a mind like a steel trap" + " you have to pry it open and then it snaps closed." .. one of my favorites because it is usually  taken as complimentary.

 

ma·trix
[ˈmātriks]
l noun
1. an environment or material in which something develops; a surrounding medium or structure.

2. a mass of fine-grained rock in which gems, crystals, or fossils are embedded. A fine material used to bind together the coarser particles of a composite substance.

origin:

late Middle English (in the sense ‘womb’): from Latin, ‘breeding female’, later ‘womb’, from mater, matr- ‘mother’.
 
Living in the matrix is what a fetus does.


#6 FishnPhil

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Posted 16 June 2019 - 08:23 PM

Tjm, not sure if you understood the matrix reference but your takeaway is pretty spot on. Maybe we are all fetuses and victims of sensory stimulation :D

https://scienceblogs...y-of-the-matrix


Flicted, you were totally correct. I snuck out for a few hours, had to wake up at 4:30am to swing it though!

You need to go fishing.



#7 Flicted

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 12:37 PM

Just remember, a steel trap has nothing inside it.

#8 mikechell

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 02:04 PM

A steel trap gets rusty and hard to open, too.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 




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