Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

NC native Brookie rod length


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Swampfoxforeman

Swampfoxforeman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 31 July 2019 - 12:34 PM

I have decided to go with a 3 weight setup for native Brookies here in N.C. Im looking for length rod suggestions. What yalls thoughts?

#2 Flicted

Flicted

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 432 posts

Posted 31 July 2019 - 12:41 PM

Many factors. If you have a lot of overhead tree cover, I would move towards a shorter rod under 9'. Maybe down to 7 1/2'. But for different types of fishing, overhead casting may not be as much of a factor.

#3 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,871 posts

Posted 31 July 2019 - 01:04 PM

I've got a 5'6" 3/4 weight that Steeldrifter made for me.  I love it for casting under docks and overhangs.  And I can reach out almost as far as I can with my 9' 5 weight.

 

And it's a blast when I get a fish on !!!


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#4 DrLogik

DrLogik

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts

Posted 31 July 2019 - 07:48 PM

Swamp,

 

For the last 40 years I've been fishing either a 7 1/2 foot or a 9 foot rod in the Smokies even in dense rhododendron cover.  The longer rod enables longer bow and arrow casts (frequent) and shorter more effect roll casts (infrequently unless there are open areas).

 

Wild NC Brookies are easy to catch as long as you don't spook them.  If you walk up to the edge of the stream, don't expect to catch many.  I stand back at least 6 to 8 feet from the stream and am often on my belly or knees...rarely do I stand up.  Heck, a lot of the time you can't stand up! LOL. 

 

They also hole-up in the most difficult to get to places.  Rarely will you catch a wild Brookie out of a pool in open areas of a stream. They prefer cover.  



#5 Swampfoxforeman

Swampfoxforeman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 03 August 2019 - 07:47 PM

Thank y’all I have been looking at getting a moonshine midnight special in 3 weight. I have my 9’ 5 weights, so I’m leaning towards a 7.5’ in the 3 weight.

#6 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,871 posts

Posted 03 August 2019 - 07:56 PM

What I think is, you could have Steeldrifter build you a custom rod for 1/2 to 2/3 of the price.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#7 Swampfoxforeman

Swampfoxforeman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 03 August 2019 - 08:10 PM

Mike thank you I send steeldrifter a PM. The midnight specials are $270 with a military discount.

#8 Swampfoxforeman

Swampfoxforeman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 03 August 2019 - 09:03 PM

I’m having steeldrifter build me a rod

#9 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,871 posts

Posted 03 August 2019 - 09:36 PM

biggrin.png I've got three ... You won't be disappointed.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#10 Dominecker

Dominecker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 04 August 2019 - 06:35 AM

DrLogik pretty much typed my post for me. As someone who has also been chasing native specks in NC for 40 years or more, I say go at least 8 feet. 7 1/2 at the very shortest. I hate a short rod, even on tiny rhodo tunnel creeks. With all the cross currents and rocks in the small creeks, you have to keep line off the water, or your fly will start dragging as soon as it lands. A short rod makes it almost impossible to keep much line off the water. Specks aren't hard to catch, unless you spook them or have a dragging fly. That in itself will often send them under a rock. You are often not doing a lot of casting on a small creek, more flipping/roll casting and bow and arrow, sometimes just dangling a couple feet of tippet off the rod tip and poking it back under a rhododendron limb; and a longer rod gives you more reach with those. My main small-stream rod is an 8' 3 weight, but I often use a 10' 3 weight.



#11 xvigauge

xvigauge

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 310 posts

Posted 04 August 2019 - 03:30 PM

A 10' 3 weight works great here in the GSMNP especially if you are using nymphs. The rhododendrons and all the other brush has never been a problem for me as the 10' rod can extend past it.

Joe