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Sacrificial Hook Cleanup For Articulated Flies


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12 replies to this topic

#1 FishnPhil

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 12:28 PM

Hello everyone, I have thought, read, and watched videos of different ways to ensure the front sacrificial hook for articulated flies is smooth after clipping it off. Some of the better ideas seems to be:

 

1) Use a metal file (small triangle one used for sharpening saws) to smooth/round it

2) Cover it with thread

3) Dab some UV resin on it and cure

4) Put glue on it

 

#1 seems to be the best because it involves nothing extra, can be done post tie, and will not come off. The rest lend themselves to failure, #3 and #4 seem like they would fail quickly. 

 

 

What method do you use to make sure your rear hook doesn't get nipped off by the sharp end of the sacrificial hook? 



#2 Mark Knapp

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 12:43 PM

Of course, one suggestion would be to use a articulating shank instead of a hook. Barring that, I would use the first method. I have an abrasive rubber wheel on a grinder that I use for things like that.



#3 flytire

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 01:07 PM

i dont know but why not just leave the hook as is?

 

if cut off doesnt it just get covered with materials?

 

or use a shank as mark mentions


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#4 whatfly

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 01:30 PM

Of course, one suggestion would be to use a articulating shank instead of a hook. Barring that, I would use the first method. I have an abrasive rubber wheel on a grinder that I use for things like that.

 

Mark has the most reasonable answer.  Or you could use something like Beadalon (c.f. Kelly Galloup videos) which is unlikely to get cut even if a sharp edge exists, or Seyno Wire, but those only works for certain patterns.  Personally, I have a heavy hook file at my tying table and I just hit the edges quickly when using hooks for lead section, which is cheaper than shanks and not that much extra effort.  YMMV.



#5 FishnPhil

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 03:42 PM

Mark, I have a small metal file for sharpening saws that I will likely use (or at least try). Thanks!

 

flytire, for the longer (5-6") ones I could leave the front hook on but for smaller (2-3") ones the front hook will interfere with the action (or motion of the ocean as I like to say ;)) and we don't want that! I have never fished articulated flies to be able to tell you if the materials will interfere with the front shank once it's cut. I suppose it should be cut short enough so the trailing hook and materials are able to rotate completely around freely. I'm glad you pointed this out and will test my first couple to ensure it doesn't catch. :)

 

whatfly, beadalon...I would never have thought of that. Great tip! Next time this is likely what I'll use. Cheap, flexible, and plentiful, all things I like in tying materials :)

 

 

I used hooks instead of shanks because I had a box of 50 large hooks, purchased very cheap on clearance, that I can't imagine ever using, lol. So I put them to use instead of buying the shanks, which are as expensive as hooks! 

 

I'll try the file this week and see how good the results are. 



#6 Poopdeck

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 03:51 PM

I use articulated shanks both bought and made but I have to say articulated flies lost its shine for me. I just didn't see a return on the time investment. However, if I had hooks I didn't need then I would clip away and pass a file over any burr or sharp edge.

#7 Mark Knapp

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 12:31 AM

Yep, since you have hooks, it makes sense. You may have a problem using a file to deber the hooks as they are pretty close to the same hardness. I have a diamond hook sharpener that I have used for the same thing. Some areas require a single hook, in that case you must cut the first one off.



#8 flytire

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 04:56 AM

Makita-GB600enl-1.jpg

 

squatch says this will take care of any burrs on your little hook

 

HzL.gif


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#9 Brian Myers

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:16 AM

Eze Lap Diamond hone and stone http://TinyURL.com/y53njg2l

I use the fine for sharpening hooks ( at the bench and on the water) but for large hooks the med may be better when you have more metal to remove. You can buy them individually but for what most places charge for one (plus shipping) you may as well get the set. They do come in handy for other things too.



#10 mikechell

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:20 AM

Do you cut the barb end off before you start tying?  If so, then any grinding or filing should work.

 

If you cut it off after tying, then coating the end with UV resin should work.  That stuff stays put, in my experience.


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#11 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 01:13 PM

I usually cut off the front hook just in front of the bend for my articulated flies. I've never smoothed, filed, or de-burred them in anyway. I use 25-30 lb. mono for my connection. I have articulated flies constructed this way that I've been using for years. I've never a problem with the rear hook getting cut off. I think it would take a sharper edge or burr than I can create to saw through that heavy mono.

 

For what it's worth. :)


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#12 vicente

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 05:51 PM

I use beadalon for the connection, I get better movement than I did with mono, it's also a whole lot tougher.

#13 FishnPhil

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 07:41 PM

I cut them all, piece of cake. Snipped close to where the thread ended om the front hook. Out of a dozen or so I had to use the file on 2. I probably didn't need to file those but am paranoid.

Here's the file

2aahr7r.jpg

Thank you all for the suggestions.