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The batteries in my cautery ran out


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25 replies to this topic

#1 Mark Knapp

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:39 PM

I have two medical cauteries that my brother in law, the ER nurse, got for me. The Docs throw them away after one use, it's not possible to sterilize them for another use. The batteries ran low in them and I thought it a waist to throw them away so I changed the batteries in them.

 

I realize I'm probably not the first person to ever do this and I suspect that it may have been posted here before. If it's been covered I apologize for using up band width. If it's been a while, someone may benefit by it.

 

Here's what I did.

 

DSCF2909-L.jpg

This is what the back end of the cautery looks like. I used my belt sander to remove the rolled end that holds the end cap in.

 

DSCF2911-XL.jpg

Under the end cap is a spring and a plastic divider. Take them out....

 

DSCF2913-XL.jpg

....and it looks like this. Bend the copper tab up and remove the batteries.

 

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Here's all the stuff. Put in new batteries.

 

DSCF2915-XL.jpg

Reassemble it the way it came apart and put on a new end cap. I use these rubber end caps that I got off eBay for ice fishing rods I make. They work perfectly for the cautery. You will need a 5/8 inch cap.

 

One warning though, the cautery will be much hotter than it was when you last used it so be careful. You could singe the heck out of stuff if you're not careful.

 

DSCF2916-XL.jpg

Some ice flies for this winter and soft hackle wets for this summer all made with the help of my regenerised cautery.



#2 tjm

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:47 PM

So what does that do in tying of flies?



#3 Noahguide

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:12 PM

Cleanly removed excess hair or feathers near the hook eye when finishing flies. Mine is from a craft store in the beading department, around $10, made to swap batteries out.

#4 mikechell

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:13 PM

If Mark is talking about the same tool I know of:

Cauterizing tools can be used to burn reliefs into deer hair bugs, so the eyes can be mounted into the pocket.  It makes them look really cool ... but I don't know if it makes them better fish catching lures.

It can also be used to trim wing shapes, etc.  Anything you need a small, hot cutting device ... the cauterizing tool can do it.


Barbed hooks rule!
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#5 tjm

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:29 PM

hmm, always something to learn. I guess I never needed a small hot cutting device is why I asked. Probably not something I'll rush out and buy, but it's neat to know stuff.



#6 Noahguide

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:44 PM

More precise than using a lighter, too.

#7 Mark Knapp

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:56 PM

I use it to remove head cement or CA glue from the eye too. It's a handy tool.



#8 Kimo

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 06:34 PM

hmm, always something to learn. I guess I never needed a small hot cutting device is why I asked. Probably not something I'll rush out and buy, but it's neat to know stuff.

I thought the same thing also until i got one.
It has turned out to be really useful.

Fortunately, I also bought mine from Michaels for really cheap 

compared to a fly shop.

Kimo



#9 tjm

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 07:21 PM

Kimo, I  can picture me bringing it too close to some synthetic material or my head lacquer and burning down the castle. I can't even picture how it could be used around the eye or head without melting the thread and wasting the fly.

I'll have to google up some patterns that call for such things, because I can't think of any flies I normally use where it might even  used.



#10 Mark Knapp

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 07:38 PM

TJM, I use a hackle guard to protect my head and hackles when I use it to clear the eye. Works good.



#11 DrLogik

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:34 PM

They are a great little tool to have on the bench.  I have found that if I leave the batteries in the device that they quickly drain.  I have two different tools and they both do this.  If I know I'm not going to be tying for a while I take the batteries out.  I have also found them to be finicky no matter how much I pay for one.



#12 Mark Knapp

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 02:03 PM

DrLogik, I've had my medical supply versions for years, and I never took the batteries out. This is the first time I changed the batteries in 6 years. If you think about it, one meant for surgery should neither have drained batteries or be finicky. I've never tried the commercially available ones so I can't say, but I wonder if they are inferior. Can you tell me which ones you've tried?



#13 stabgnid

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 03:22 PM

My wife got me one 2yrs ago from Castors online and it is one of my most useful tool I have !! She got me the one that has a replaceable tip I have yet to need to re place it yet 

Steve-stabgnid 


"I don't fly fish I just love to tie flies"

    Steve-stabgnid


#14 Crackaig

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 12:25 PM

I bought one several years ago. Back then they were not easy to come by. Cost me a lot for what is was £35:00. The tip lasted a couple of years then needed to be replaced. What got me was the tip price. £28:00 each.
Now there is a craft one available for much less. The unit is about £10:00 and the replacement tips £5:00 for two. Search for "Thread Zap".

Cheers,

C.


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by the clean end"


#15 vicrider

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 12:04 AM

I don't know about the medical one. Something about what it may have been used to cauterize just leaves a bad taste in my use of one. I bought mine as a circumcision cauterizing tool and it has replaceable batteries. Would not one in the house just knowing it had been used for that before I got it. They are handy for some things but I still use my hackle guard and lighter more often than the tool. I have too often burnt the thread trying to get that nice clean head.  A hackle guard and lighter clean well and guard protects everything behind the head.