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Fun with my latest creation (Clark Dubbing Block)


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17 replies to this topic

#1 letumgo

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 04:43 PM

Last weekend I spent some time and made up a dubbing block (Dick Clark was a long time friend of James Leisenring, and he developed a simple wooden dubbing block for creating the spun dubbing bodies for soft hackle flies and flymphs). I saw photos for one in a new book I received for Christmas ("Tying & Fishing Soft-Hackled Nymphs" by Allen McGee/Page 27/ISBN-13 978-1-57188-403-9). It just a simple wooden block 5.5" x 3" x 1" with five brass nails in it. I attached a strip of leather suede to the bottom of the block to help keep it from sliding around on my desk while I spin the silk thread at the center of the bodies.

I made up a bunch of different combinations of colored silk and various hares ear dubbing blends and then mounted them on a cardboard card for storage.

Here are a few photos showing some of the fun I've been having, tying more soft hackle flies for spring. These darned things are addicting.

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http://www.flytyingf...gettyer=letumgo

Ray (letumgo) <)((((><<

#2 Soft-hackle

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 04:50 PM

Hey, Ray,
I've seen the dubbing block. I've never used one, but from the look of it, it'd probably work great. Guess I'm going to have to break down and make one. Yours looks great, and the flies are super, too.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty. Edward R. Hewitt

Personal Page Flymphs,Soft-hackles & Spiders Flymph Forum

#3 Ron Eagle Elk

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 05:46 PM

Oh-oh Ray. You've stepped on the slippery slope now. I have several cards of different waxed silk colors with different dubbing materials. You should see the plover, jackdaw, and woodcock feathers in my collection.

Very nice flies.

REE

#4 letumgo

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 06:07 PM

REE - I laughed when I read your comment about a slippery slope. I've been sliding deeper and deeper into soft hackles for a while now. I knew I was getting close to loosing my balance when I recently bought two mole skins. It's nice to know that you are further down the slope than I am. I still do not own any plover, jackdaw, and woodcock feathers...yet. biggrin.gif hysterical.gif j_k.gif
http://www.flytyingf...gettyer=letumgo

Ray (letumgo) <)((((><<

#5 Harold Ray

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 06:25 PM

QUOTE
when I recently bought two mole skins.


Ray,

Where did you get the mole skins? The last time I bought I couldn't find them anywhere but England!

Thanks!

Ray
Ray Emerson, D.V.M.
Waco, Texas

E-mail: [email protected]

Phone: Office: 254-772-3520, Cell: 254-744-2393

#6 letumgo

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 09:39 PM

Ray - I bought mine from a shop near my house, but I just checked J.Stockards and found that they carry them. The fur is super soft and makes nice thorax on softhackle flies.

Here is a shortcut link:
Mole Skins at J. Stockards

Have fun! wink.gif
http://www.flytyingf...gettyer=letumgo

Ray (letumgo) <)((((><<

#7 VERN-O

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 05:48 AM

also www.eflytyer.com has mole skins

#8 Soft-hackle

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 10:42 AM

Mole can also be purchased from Jim Slattery.

Jims Fly Company

It's a must have dubbing for Iron Blue Duns and various other great flies.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty. Edward R. Hewitt

Personal Page Flymphs,Soft-hackles & Spiders Flymph Forum

#9 idryfly

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:09 PM

Mole can be purchased many places. I carry it from both Cookshill (natural) and Veniards, (both natural and 8 dyed colors) However, I'd suggest buying from the sponser of this site simply because it's the right thing to do if they have what you need.
Cheers,
Mike
Regards,
Mike

"There is no Hell. There is only France" F.Z.


#10 letumgo

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:21 PM

idryfly - How much are you asking for the natural colored mole skins? I've only been able to get my hands on dyed black and dyed brown skins. Are the natural colored a light gray? What are the other colors you carry?

Sorry to have so many questions. Thanks in advance for the answers.
http://www.flytyingf...gettyer=letumgo

Ray (letumgo) <)((((><<

#11 RoyalWulff

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:24 PM

Hey,

Beauty flies! That looks like a great dubbing block, nice amd simple! What is the black stuff under the dubbing on the block? Also, how do you spin the thread to make the brush?

Beautiful flies!
[/b]Ontario/Newfoundland Canada

#12 Harold Ray

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:35 PM

I just didn't look in the right places!!!! I googled at the time and didn't come up with a thing, except England, so I bought it there. I did check Stockards and a couple of more at the time and didn't see mole. I generally buy much of my material from Stockard because I like their easily maneuverd site, simple check-out, vast supply and general friendliness.

Next time, I'll know!!!

Ray
Ray Emerson, D.V.M.
Waco, Texas

E-mail: [email protected]

Phone: Office: 254-772-3520, Cell: 254-744-2393

#13 letumgo

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:39 PM

RoyalWulff - Thanks. Glad you liked the flies. The black stuff under the dubbin is a simple strip or suede leather. I colored one side with a black sharpie marker to give it a high contrast when I am using light colored silk and dubbing. I can flip the leather over and the other side is a medium brown color (kind of dark tan/beige). Ideally I would have white on one side and black on the other, but this is what I had handy.

I just use my hands to twist the ends of the silk. I pinch the ends of the silk thread between my thumb and index finger and give it a twist. Then I grab it with my other hand and repeatedly twist in the same direction. Once I'm happy with the amount of twist, I slide the far end into the slot on the cardboard and then catch the other in the slot on the other side. It takes longer to describe than it does to actually make each spun silk/dubbing body. After the silk has sat around for a couple days, it holds the twist pretty well when you remove them from the cardboard holder.
http://www.flytyingf...gettyer=letumgo

Ray (letumgo) <)((((><<

#14 idryfly

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 01:00 PM

Ray, check your messages. smile.gif
Regards,
Mike

"There is no Hell. There is only France" F.Z.


#15 SSC

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:23 PM

Ray,

I know this is an ancient post but I see you are still around the site and posting some pics of some beautiful ties.  I just made 2 of the Clark style dubbing blocks and had a couple of questions I was hoping you or anyone else, could answer.  I read some where that waxing the thread helps to "set"  the twist into the brush and keep it together when removed from the card.  If you use wax, what have you been using?  Have you experimented to see if some wax works better than others?  Also, are you tying multiple flies out of one brush?  

I just made 6 brushes, 3 each on 2 different colors of silk thread waxed with some regular dubbing wax because that is what I had around.   I put them on a slotted piece of cardboard and labeled them, but I already want to make something with them!  Also made 3 brushes using small silver UTC wire, at least I can use them, then I'll be able to leave the others alone.

The original design of the Clark Dubbing Block has the thread ends held by the user.  I made one block in this style, but the second block I made so that loop end is at the user side of the board.  I made it this way so I could use a Cal-Bird dubbing tool or a cordless drill to do the twisting.  After making this set of brushes with the Cal-Bird tool, I really don't see me needing to use a hook/cordless drill set up.  The whole set up cost me pennies and a little bit of time. Making the dubbing brush in the horizontal plane just makes things easier.  Interested in your answers...

                                Steve