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Shrimp flies

shrimp shrimp flies

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Micke.H

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Posted 21 February 2016 - 09:07 AM

Some more shrimp flies , from my vice to fish after sea trout in the sea.

 

shrimp1.jpg shrimp2.jpg shrimp3.jpg

 

 

 


Tight lines

And happy tying

Micke


#2 Piker20

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Posted 21 February 2016 - 01:17 PM

Have you seen the thread on single mono thread shrimp?

I've yet to hook a fish on anything other than a minnow type bait. Keep trying the shrimp and scud patterns but nothing yet. I do wonder if sea trout become zoned in on sandeels as browns do with mayflies?
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#3 FlaFly

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Posted 21 February 2016 - 02:41 PM

I've caught jillions of seatrout on shrimp (the live ones)... can't imagine they wouldn't like a good copy.


"Good advice is always certain to be ignored, but that's no reason not to give it."

Agatha Christie

 

"No one wants advice -- only corroboration."

John Steinbeck

 

"I had six faithful serving men, they taught me all I knew.

Their names were what? and why? and when? and how? and where? and who?"
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#4 Philly

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Posted 21 February 2016 - 09:38 PM

Nice. They would work as a grass shrimp around here. I think we're talking two different trout here. We do have some sea run brown trout that migrate up the Manasquan River in North Central NJ. What we call sea trout are members of the drum family We have the Weakfish in this area, I think they range Chesapeake Bay up to New England. What FlaFly is referring to is the Spotted sea trout which haunts the SE coast and the Gulf coast
"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#5 Micke.H

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 07:16 AM

I fish for sea trout in the sea, then you can fish for sea trout in the rivers here, It is the same fish but they are walking up the rivers to spawn and some wander not out again to the sea but remain in the river after spawning, I hope I get it right,.

 

When I fish for sea trout in the rivers  I use different flies example tube flies or flies tied on double or single hooks whit hair wings


Tight lines

And happy tying

Micke


#6 FlaFly

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 11:36 AM

Basically right.... there's lots of fish species that spend their adult life in the open sea (full strength seawater or about 34 ppt).  Since fish larvae and fry don't have the ability to osmoregulate (no kidneys) till they develop them, many marine species spawn, or at least lay their eggs, in river mouths... not in the pure freshwater, but in the brackish zone where the salinity is as I recall about 19 ppt, equal to the osmoticity of the fishes tissues.  Once mature, the new little fish tend to stay in the estuary for a while before they move out into the open sea.  Just remember, by that reckoning, the bigger ones will be out in the saltwater, although not as abundant.  Frankly, I find the estuarine little guys better to eat.   :-)


"Good advice is always certain to be ignored, but that's no reason not to give it."

Agatha Christie

 

"No one wants advice -- only corroboration."

John Steinbeck

 

"I had six faithful serving men, they taught me all I knew.

Their names were what? and why? and when? and how? and where? and who?"
Rudyard Kipling
 


#7 Philly

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 02:33 PM

Then it's probably sea run brown or rainbow trout you're fishing for rather than what we call sea trout here. Weakfish and the spotted sea trout are purely salt water fish. They spawn in estuaries, like Chesapeake and Delaware Bays but they don't migrate into fresh water to spawn. West Coast steelhead(rainbow trout)spend their life in the ocean but spawn in fresh water. Not sure if sea run brown trout have a separate designation here. There use to be and may still be sea run brook trout along the New England coast, that were/are called coasters. Like your fish sometimes they stay in fresh water rather than return to the sea.
We do have anadromous fish like striped bass, American shad and herring which live in salt water but spawn in fresh water. It wasn't until some striped bass were caught behind a dam on their spawning river when the gates closed that people found out they could survive in fresh water. Now they're a primary game fish in many fresh water lakes.
As an afterthought your shrimp patterns tied smaller would make great scud patterns.
"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#8 tidewaterfly

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 05:46 PM

Micke, those are great! Some of the better shrimp patterns I've seen. Like some of the others I've caught Seatrout/Weakfish, but not sea run trout. I lived in MD, near the Chesapeake Bay most of my life and moved to SC last year. There are no trout near where I live now, except the saltwater type. Your patterns would do well here along the salt marsh creeks I'm sure. 

 

There are Redfish too (Red Drum, Channel Bass) along the coast of SC & I would bet your pattern would work great for them. 

 

BTW, I live very near Lake Marion, one of the lakes (100,000 acres) that make up the Santee Cooper Lakes. Lake Moultrie is the other lake (60,000 acres). There are Striped Bass in the lakes and I've been told, this is the only freshwater lake system in the world where Striped bass spawn naturally. Apparently when the lake was dammed up in the 1930's, it was during the spawning run & the Striped Bass were trapped & couldn't return to the ocean. So, they adapted & have been reproducing ever since. Not sure if there are shrimp of any type in this lake, but have seen clam & mussel shells along the water front. The Santee & Cooper Rivers are both either salt or brackish water for much of their length below the lakes, so there may be shrimp in them, possibly even up to the dam.

 

My guess is your pattern in an appropriate size might also imitate crayfish, of which there are many here in the lake & other local waters. smile.png







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