Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

dry floatant question


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#16 j8000

j8000

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts

Posted 07 January 2017 - 11:07 PM

That is a good point Mike.  Gasoline does stink!!  I might try the white gas for this spring.   I usually have plenty around handy.



#17 phg

phg

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,249 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 08:10 AM

Mike, I was thinking the same thing, that the smell in gasoline is added.  Coleman ™ fuel might also work.  It is white naptha, with little discernable odor.



#18 mikechell

mikechell

    Cold weather afficando- Give me Snow or give me death!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,210 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 11:10 AM

Coleman ™ fuel might also work.  It is white naptha, with little discernable odor.

That's what I meant with "white gas".


Barbed hooks rule!

I am not lazy.  I just truly enjoy doing nothing.

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

quondam fidelis


#19 j8000

j8000

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 11:32 AM

I prefer the white gas over propane when it comes to lanterns, cook stoves and irons.



#20 phg

phg

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,249 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 01:19 PM

Sorry Mike.  To borrow a quote from George Bernard Shaw, we are "...a people separated by a common language." 



#21 shoebop

shoebop

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 02:31 PM

Naphthalene or Naphtha is the main component in white gas aka Coleman fuel. It does not have the additives but alas it still has the odor. I have used it myself with paraffin as a floatant but I am dissatisfied with the odor which does not dissipate very well. It took several months before the smell went away to an acceptable level. I don't like the smell in my fly boxes or on my flies. It can't be a good thing. For me, the odor is not worth the pennies saved in place of a commercial floatant.


Shoebop

#22 j8000

j8000

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 02:47 PM

Well if it worked for an expert fisherman like Ray Bergman, it's worth a try for me this spring.  However, I'd probably use a separate box for those flies so to contaminate only those dry flies in use.



#23 SilverCreek

SilverCreek

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,892 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 03:20 PM



The smell/aroma/odor of gasoline is an additive ... designed to alert someone that it's leaking out.

 

"White gas" (camp-stove fuel) and lighter fluids don't have aromatic additives.  That would be my only reason to recommend the latter over the former.

 

I agree with your recommendation. Naptha is the mixture of 5 - 9 carbon hydrocarbons called white gas as is noted here. It has low odor and is what I would recommend for use in the Bergman formula:

 

https://en.wikipedia...ki/Coleman_fuel

 

 

"Coleman fuel is a petroleum naphtha product marketed by The Coleman Company. Historically called white gas (not white spirit), it is a liquid petroleum fuel (100% light hydrotreated distillate) usually sold in one gallon cans.[1] It is used primarily for fueling lanterns and camp stoves."

 

https://michaelgraci...oatant-formula/

 

Here is the original formula from Ray Bergman's "Trout":

 

http://www.drlogik.c...man_formula.pdf

 

DrLogic did a test of floatants you can read about here:

 

http://www.drlogik.c...yfloatants.html


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#24 shoebop

shoebop

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 03:51 PM

The naphtha/paraffin concoction might float your fly but I have seen nothing that tells me it will not affect the fish in a negative way. I aired out my flies for days after treating them before returning them to a box. They still reeked and continued to reek for months. Every time I opened my box I was greeted with the smell of naphtha.  If you guys are catching too many fish and don't care if a couple of fish turn up their noses at your offering, then by all means, give it a shot. My observations are in no way to be taken as an insult to Ray Bergman or anyone else who stands by this homemade mixture. It is just my personal opinion and nothing more.

 

On another note...and back to my original point of this post...I purchased a quart container of  dry silicone floatant that I am hoping will be an economical and odorless solution to the floatant issue. I have enough for many life times. BTW it is the right kind of silicone.


Shoebop

#25 phg

phg

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,249 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 07:54 PM

...but have you ever tested it on fish?  Odd as it may seem, WD-40 is a fish attractant, and I hate the smell of that stuff!  Naphtha may have a similar effect.  Jus' sayin....



#26 mikechell

mikechell

    Cold weather afficando- Give me Snow or give me death!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,210 posts

Posted 08 January 2017 - 10:56 PM

I bought a can of "Block Out" spray on water repellent from the "As seen on TV" store.  It has worked well for my floating fly lines.  I've been meaning to try it on some flies, but I just don't fish dry flies.  Top water poppers, yes, but they don't need anything.

 

I've tried finding another can of "Block Out", but I don't think they sell it anymore.

 

This stuff looks good, too.

 

http://www.houzz.com...ustrial-primers


Barbed hooks rule!

I am not lazy.  I just truly enjoy doing nothing.

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

quondam fidelis


#27 Mogup

Mogup

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 447 posts

Posted 09 January 2017 - 12:23 AM

When I was a kid the two older gentlemen who taught me to fly fish used that stuff. It worked well as far as I can remember and I would not have remembered that stuff if not for this post .

#28 shoebop

shoebop

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

Posted 09 January 2017 - 09:43 AM

...but have you ever tested it on fish?  Odd as it may seem, WD-40 is a fish attractant, and I hate the smell of that stuff!  Naphtha may have a similar effect.  Jus' sayin....

The main ingredient in WD-40 is........Naphtha!  

 

Sorry PHG, WD-40 is not a fish attractant! It was long ago debunked as an old wives tale...even by the company itself. It too is a petroleum product and NOT made with any fish products as has been claimed. Snopes has an article on it I believe.


Shoebop

#29 Kentuckysteve

Kentuckysteve

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 419 posts

Posted 09 January 2017 - 10:14 AM

I my younger days we used WD-40 on catfish bait and they go crazy for it.There were pay lakes here that offered prize money for tagged fish and they had actually banned the use of WD-40 because it is so effective.

 

I have used Rain X on flies and it worked great.


There is no greater fan of fly fishing........Than the worm. -  Patrick F. McManus


#30 heavynets

heavynets

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 668 posts

Posted 09 January 2017 - 05:37 PM

https://wd40.com/coo...gends-fun-facts

 

This WD-40 site says that it is 50% mineral spirits, so how can the main ingredient be naphtha?