Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

First Lures (not flies)


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#16 tidewaterfly

tidewaterfly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,135 posts

Posted 02 November 2019 - 09:11 PM

Tidewater, somehow you mistakenly came to think that TIER is not in the US. He lives in Alaska. Perhaps you meant the continental US. Either way, it doesn't mater, he has everything available to him that we all have, US or not.

 

His location is not his excuse, it's his haste to do everything, all of it, right now. In order to do things well, he needs to slow down, decide what he wants to do the most and concentrate on just a few things. When he has a handle those, then he can move on to other things.

 

James, we can't help you if we can't see what you are doing. My suggestion to you is like everybody else's. First, learn to take a good picture. After you do that we will be able to help you do everything else.

Thanks Mark! My mistake, I was thinking that he was in the UK. Appreciate the correction and I agree with the evaluation of his issue. Most of us were likely the same to some degree when we were younger. 



#17 tidewaterfly

tidewaterfly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,135 posts

Posted 02 November 2019 - 09:20 PM

This was my bible - all those years ago when I was learning to make lures (lures came first - then the fly tying...).  Yes, it's an old book but it does cover lots and lots of stuff.  TACKLE CRAFT by Boyd Pfeiffer... Bet you can find a used copy for almost nothing... 

 

Great book and Mr. Pfeiffer is a character too. I've had the pleasure of meeting him a few times. He lived in MD. Some of my fellow MD Fly Anglers members where good friends and fishing buddies with him, and he would grace us at meetings and other club events. He was really a great guy to be around! smile.png



#18 SilverCreek

SilverCreek

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,415 posts

Posted 03 November 2019 - 10:08 AM

This was my bible - all those years ago when I was learning to make lures (lures came first - then the fly tying...).  Yes, it's an old book but it does cover lots and lots of stuff.  TACKLE CRAFT by Boyd Pfeiffer... Bet you can find a used copy for almost nothing... 

 

Shipping is free:

 

https://www.abebooks...-boyd-pfeiffer/


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#19 Capt Bob LeMay

Capt Bob LeMay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,585 posts

Posted 04 November 2019 - 06:01 AM

Might as well go all the way for those wanting to make a lure or two (or two thousand...).... Here's the best source I know of for all of your lure making bits and pieces... 

  

https://www.lurepartsonline.com/

 

I do a bit of business with their wholesale side and they've been really great for some years now....  

 

A warning - be careful, lure making, like fly tying - can be addictive...


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#20 DarrellP

DarrellP

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 432 posts

Posted 04 November 2019 - 06:36 AM

Tier, whatever you do, keep your first lures. Keep at it. I like to buy lures or flies to use as a model. Look at step by step guides. Practice.
"Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job." John Geirach

#21 Philly

Philly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,600 posts

Posted 04 November 2019 - 08:33 PM

I probably make better lures out of foam to use with my fly rod than I do wood ones to use with my spinning gear.   I can't argue with any of the suggestions made.  What lures I've made out of wood(wooden dowls, broom handles) were simple ones, needle fish, poppers/chuggers and pencil poppers.  Paint jobs were lousy.  I used acrylics but nothing fancy just basic red/white, blue/white, yellow, white or orange.  They were meant to catch bluefish.  Who chewed them up.   Read, experiment, learn.  Can't see much from your pictures, but one suggestion would be to use open eye screws for line attachment point in the front and to anchor the hook in the back.


"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#22 Capt Bob LeMay

Capt Bob LeMay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,585 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 06:46 AM

sorry about that - fixed the original post to add      https://www.lurepartsonline.com/

 

Now I'll go sit somewhere and chant - proofread, proofread....


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#23 Poopdeck

Poopdeck

    You damn kids, get off my lawn!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,868 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 08:03 AM

The shaping and painting of a lure is the easiest part of the process. The true art in lure making is the weighting and placement of the weight. You can get a block of would to swim the way you want it to by weighting. I've use to make lures but stopped a long time ago because the process was just to time consuming. The construction was easy but the testing was very time intensive.

Nothing wrong with using wood. Resin is just more time and more mess. I agree with philly to use the screw eyes. It appears in your picture you were using a thorough wire. Lots of debate on this but, in my opinion, thru wire is not needed unless your making giant halibut lures.

#24 Capt Bob LeMay

Capt Bob LeMay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,585 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 12:29 PM

Depends on where you are and what you're going to be tossing lures at.... The master luremaker down here in south Florida was Bob White (long gone I'm afraid...).  I was very fortunate to hook up with him as both a customer and a young guy wanting to learn... He was a life member of the Tropical Anglers Club (still going strong with a website as well...) and one of my many mentors...

 

He didn't make many plugs - he was mostly a bucktail jig maker  ( and he made every kind and style of bucktails from bonefish size jigs all the up to ones that weighed half a pound...) - but all the plugs he made were turned out on a wood lathe - out of cedar mostly...  Every one of them were through wired with one or two trebles (depending on style).  His most popular model was a small, 3.5" chugger with a one inch face.  That plug could raise fish off of wreck in almost 200 feet of water (it made that much noise if you worked it right... ) and took every specie of bluewater fish as well as inshore fish so you really needed it to be through wired.... with just a single triple strength treble on the stern end.  I personally took sharks, jacks, king mackeral, barracuda, and lots of other species with it as well.  A buddy of mine one day even took a 28lb African Pompano with one - within sight of the Palm Beach inlet...   It was the first thing we'd toss as we approached shallow wrecks and navigation markers out of the Keys or along the coast of the Everglades - and you could sure start a party with one.  At times it would draw fish to the surface where we could then toss flies at them... 

 

Yes, the proper weighting of wooden plugs is very important.  Those poppers (or chuggers as they were called locally...) had almost 3/8oz of lead in them (Bob carefully drilled a hole at right angles into the bottom of the plug between the center and the stern end - then use a Lee production lead pot to pour a precise amount of molten lead into it - before the plug was painted and wired...).

 

I might actually have one or two of them still around that were made at least thirty years ago - then stored away....


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#25 TIER

TIER

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 296 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 12:57 PM

I was actually useing a bent 1/0 hook with a treble.


1. The captain is always right

2. It's the deckhand's fault

 

 


#26 Philly

Philly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,600 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 01:57 PM

Just a clarification, are you planning on using these lures with spinning tackle or a fly rod?   Since you're using a 1/0 hook shank to build them, they may not be heavy enough to use with a spinning rod, well, maybe an ultra-lite spinning rod.   What is the lip on the pink one made from?  You mentioned that it spins when you retrieve it.  You really don't want a lure to spin, it will mess up your line or leader.    Nothing wrong with using a hook shank to build the lure around.  When I started making lures for my fly rod, I used hook shanks, usually from a 4XL or 6XL hook.   When you make the loop to hold the hook, it helps to heat up the area and then bend it to form the loop and give you a tighter one.  When you're mounting the hook use a split ring.  It makes it easier to change hooks, and if you're using a dressed hook it will give it more action.


"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#27 TIER

TIER

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 296 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 02:05 PM

I made the lip with a plactic spoon. Imma use it on a bait caster for silver salmon and king salmon.


1. The captain is always right

2. It's the deckhand's fault

 

 


#28 tidewaterfly

tidewaterfly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,135 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 02:49 PM

I made the lip with a plactic spoon. Imma use it on a bait caster for silver salmon and king salmon.

 

IF you used a basic plastic spoon like you get at a fast food store, it won't hold up. The plastic is too thin & too brittle. I like that you're thinking and trying to use what you have, but first rock you hit with it, it's probably destroyed. Most likely too if you don't break the lip casting or retrieving and do hook up to a Salmon, it's going to get broken and will be a one fish lure.  Places like Lurepartsonline that Capt Bob suggested will have plastic lips that are more appropriate for what you intend. There are other good sources too for lure components. 

 

I know a lot of folks who make lures and there is a debate about thru wire and screw eyes. I've fished lures that were made both ways and have caught plenty of fish. But, it will depend on the fish, how big & how strong they may be & how well you build the lure which method is more appropriate. Soft woods & screw eyes may not always work well together. 

 

I lost a rear hook on a wooden lure once, because the builder skimped and used screw eyes that were too short. The whole screw stripped out of the wood. This was done fortunately on a snag and not a big fish. Since then, on lures I've bought that had screw eyes i would take them apart & check, and epoxy them back in place, and replace the screw eye with longer if I thought it was needed. I've never had that happen with thru wired lures, but have had a few get wet & swell. That meant the wood was not properly sealed. The guys who build wood surf lures and know what they're doing all have solved these problems, which is why folks buy their lures and pay the price they charge! Building these wood lures is not particularly difficult, but there are "details" that you would be well advised to learn about if you're serious about making them. 

 

Just for your reference, I'm a big fan of RM Tackle, who makes surf fishing, wooden lures. Check out their website (https://www.rmtackle.com/) and look at the detail of the lures there. I know surf lures & lures typically used for Salmon are not the same, but there's a lot of similarities in building any lures from wood. You might even get some cool ideas from the visit! 

 

I also know a fellow in Japan who has some seriously mad skills when it comes to making lures. If you have an Instagram account, check him out. makilure2018  His talents are way out there and I think you'll enjoy looking at what he makes! smile.png  



#29 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,916 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 03:13 PM

I've never made a lure from scratch, but I've resurrected many. 

Screw in eyes are not for saltwater use, in my opinion.  You can rinse them off all you want, but the salt water that's penetrated between the eye threads and the wood will cause them to rust and get loose.  I don't care how well you paint, there will be some water making it's way into that area.   My time around Cherry Point/Camp Lejeune, fishing salt, taught me all I needed to know on that point.

Even on fresh water lures, those screws can be loosened with a small amount of corrosion.

 

I've also seen screw eyes split the wood ... a real bummer if you've spent time shaping the wood, only to have it ruined.

 

I've split wood lure bodies, burned in a wire and glued them together.  I always felt much better about going after fish with them than with screw eyes.  I don't mess with lures much, any more.  Love my Rapalas, now, since they are wired.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#30 Poopdeck

Poopdeck

    You damn kids, get off my lawn!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,868 posts

Posted 05 November 2019 - 03:33 PM

The debate over thru wire and screw eyes is long and will never end. I use to do thru wire for my striper plugs and screw in for your freshwater bass stuff. I have read tests of proper length epoxied in screw eyes being stronger then the wood itself so I believe thru wire is not necessary for my fishing and 99% of all other fishing. If your fishing for something that is going to break a piece of wood, not called balsa and basswood, then I guess thru wire reigns supreme. I've caught many large stripers and Slammer blues on screw eye wood plugs with never an issue but that's the extent of my large fish fishing. Thru wire does over piece of mind over the long haul.

The placing of weight in various amounts and locations in a plug along the length is more for the levelness of the sink or buoyancy. The placing of weight up or down from the center line of the plug is what determines, along with shape, the amount of wiggle/wobble or glide a bait has. There's a lot more to Lure building then simply carving out a fish shape, painting it and slapping hooks and lips on them.

Some of the striper plugs made by noted builders in NJ sell for 60 bucks and up to hundreds. They have tested the crap out of their lures and are able to duplicate them. They use all thru wire construction by the way. I made quite a few myself and even built a duplicator for my lathe so I could turn consistent shapes. The weighting and testing and weighting and testing of unfinished plugs was the time consuming part and it must be done after sealer is applied but before the final paint job and with all the hardware temporarily installed. I called it quits because it was simply way to much work before even one workable plug was produced. I still have various plug body's laying around hoping to "get back to it"