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Some Advice on Getting Started


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12 replies to this topic

#1 RCFetter

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 07:42 PM

I started tying last March, about 11 months ago.  For the first few days I only practiced using a whip finish tool.  Then I attempted wooley buggers and over the next few months I started tying pheasant tail nymphs and hare's ear nymphs    In addition to videos, I was getting help here and on another forum.  On average, I was tying at least 8 hrs per week.

 

In Aug and Sept I slacked off on tying, maybe an hr a week.

 

In Oct I got involved with an informal tying group that met once a week.  It's headed up by a highly skilled tyer with about 35 yrs of experience.  It was like starting all over again.

 

At the first meeting I was told I was not keeping the bobbin perpendicular to the hook and I was wrapping with the bobbin too far from the hook.  The bobbin should not be more than 2" from the hook.

 

I was taught to tie a Greenie Weenie and was told to just practice  wrapping thread on a hook and tying Greenie Weenies.

 

Here's a video on the Greenie Weenie:

 

 

The following week I was taught the simple Walt's Worm.  Here's a video:

 

 

I had problems with dubbing and learned it was only because I was not using enough pressure.  For me, it was the same with elk and deer hair.  You really have to pinch that stuff hard.

 

The thing is, if you're just getting started, start with at least one or two simple flies. They both catch fish.

 

I hope this post is a help to anyone just getting started and maybe some other experienced tyers can add some pointers.

 



#2 artimus001

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:09 PM

like most things in life.........you always need a solid foundation; slow and steady wins the race.

 

when i got back into tying last year, i didn't pick-up where i left off (spey style flies). i was right back to square one (wooly buggers, PTN's and GRHE).


 


i'm the ghetto fly guy; enjoying the sport of kings, on a pauper's budget

 

if you have something to say, you'd better bring your own soapbox

 

i'm older than dirt, but younger than the universe


#3 tidewaterfly

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:30 PM

RC, that's a good post, and darn good advice! smile.png

 

 

 

The bobbin should not be more than 2" from the hook.

 

The only thing I'll add is don't get too hung up on small details such as this. Everyone is different, so do what's most comfortable for you. I agree with this advice in spirit, because keeping thread shorter does aid in control, but again do what's most comfortable for you.



#4 mikechell

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 09:07 PM

Accept that you're learning ... and not every fly you tie will be good.  Once you accept that, then realize that not everything you tie will be an actual fly.   Let me rephrase that ... Tying is about practice.  As RC's second sentence says, "For the first few days I only practiced using a whip finish tool."

 

Spend some time just practicing a technique ... knowing that the end result is NOT going to be a fly you can fish with.  You might wrap thread on a hook to create a tapered body, only to cut it all off and do it again.  After you can repeat the perfect taper several times, THEN tie a fly.

 

It's all about concentration, patience and persistence.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#5 retrocarp

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 09:44 PM

wax on Wax off.


Nick


#6 YosemiteSam

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:45 PM

These are all very good tips.

Just what a forum entitled "Beginner's Corner" should contain I think.

I stopped tying for ten years, and like others, feel like I had to start all over again. Even then, when I first started tying I only had maybe 30-40 that I completed so it wasn't like I was a pro back then either.

Quitting drinking helped, too......



#7 bellevue.chartreuse.trout

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 08:34 AM

Crackaig reminded me recently, learn techniques and control, not specific patterns. If you master a technique, that will translate over many flies - not just to one specific fly.

 

It's all consistent with what everyone is saying here.

 

BCT



#8 marc.k4zmb

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 10:16 AM

I have elk hair that is curved through the shaft, but when I see pictures and videos of tying the elk hair is straight. Have I bought bad elk hair or is my prepping technique poor. Also any tips on dubbing would be helpful. I have a problem getting the dubbing and thread to wrap around each other as in the videos on this forum. Thanks for any help.



#9 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 11:28 AM

As with any deer/elk hair patch, you may have to sort through dozens to find one that is acceptable for your needs. That's the advantage of a local fly shop over mail order, you can pick through to find what you want.

 

Some dubbing types are easier to use than others. Fine natural and synthetic dubbing is easier to use. Coarse and longer dubbings are a little more difficult. Try using less and making a longer, thinner dubbing noodle. Some threads are better also, try a Danville pre-waxed or try using a hard dubbing wax on the thread before adding the dubbing.



#10 DrVette

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 04:36 PM

My advice would be to do a lot of research on how to select grades of hackle before buying any.



#11 Dave G.

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 05:03 PM

I have elk hair that is curved through the shaft, but when I see pictures and videos of tying the elk hair is straight. Have I bought bad elk hair or is my prepping technique poor. Also any tips on dubbing would be helpful. I have a problem getting the dubbing and thread to wrap around each other as in the videos on this forum. Thanks for any help.

That natural curve can come in handy if you ever use it for tailing fibers. Course I tend not to do that because they get broken off when using elk as tailing fibers, or that has been my experience.


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#12 Cold

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 11:58 AM



#13 Mogup

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    You guys are very cranky !

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 03:30 PM

Nice instruction Cold.