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Upside-down Mayfly


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26 replies to this topic

#16 Crackaig

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 04:09 PM

Your flies do look as if they will sit quite high on the water. The ones I tried would sit lower that may be the difference. I did try the Klinkhamer hooks, those were the ones that gave the problem. Now I tend to use shorter hooks and if I want a larger fly body go down the detached body route. Here is an example.

May%20USD_0092_zpsfj4dwfqy.JPG May%20USD_0094_zpsrh5nb2v1.JPG

Doing it this way puts the mass of the hook where the support is.

Cheers,

C.


"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical
minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which
holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd
by the clean end"


#17 Fotwin

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 05:24 PM

You are correct , the upside down fly style I use means the hackles tied on the underside of the hook
at the thorax positions do sit on the water surface and does mean the thorax and wings are clear of the water surface.

The tails sit in the surface film as does the body. The front hackle sits into the surface film and supports and balances
the thorax and wings which are not touching the water.

Using the detached body style gives a great fly which I tend to use for spinner patterns as the fly body and wings sit
in the surface film.

I use the detached body style a lot for midge patterns which work fantastically well for me when fishing
for wild brown trout in the hill Lochs.
Also the detached body style for sedge and daddy long leg patterns are amongst my favourites for dry
fly fishing.
Fotwin

#18 Fotwin

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 10:01 AM

Here are some photos,

The front hackle of the duns sits into the water supporting the thorax and the wings which lie above it,
the tails and body lie in the surface film supporting the fly.
Hope the above is clearer.

I've included a photo of the small midge patterns with detached bodies which I use. Size ? Around size 18
The hooks are Tiemco 212y which I find very good.

I've included a photo of the detached body sedges and detached body daddies , I use.
They are not my best because I've packed away some fly boxes in my house move.

As an aside, one problem with detached bodies is that the foam and thread connection can become broken either through
casting or by being chewed by a fish.

An easy way around this is to reinforce the detached body by taking a piece of monofilament, say 3-4lb strain,
and with a cigarette lighter slightly but one end to form a very small melted ball.
You then tie this into the centre of the foam detached body and then tie the completed detached tail including the nylon onto your hook shank.
I usually add a small drop of superglue onto the hook shank prior to tying in the detached tail with its central reinforced
core of nylon.
It really does make detached bodies significantly more durable

Best wishes.

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#19 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 10:18 AM

Fotwin, is that five p minted pre or post 1990? Just getting my size perspective in order. smile.png



#20 Fotwin

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 10:50 AM

It's stamped 2012 on the back so it's post 1990

Sorry I don't have a ruler handy to place alongside the flies

Fotwin

#21 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 11:09 AM

Thanks. Then it would be Ø18mm (.708").

 

So it appears that the stacked hackle is untrimmed on the bottom side? I tied up a quick one last night and when I pulled over the stacked hackle and tied it off, it didn't look as if the fly would sit flat on the water.

 

Could you list the steps in order for tying your fly? Thanks.



#22 Fotwin

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 02:17 PM

Hi Fin

As I have said , I originally prepared a series of sketches , about maybe 12-14 which showed the steps to create a fly of this style.
The drawing is now in a box in a storehouse as I have just moved home.

One of the sketches, probably the second last showed the hackle being trimmed on the underside of the fly so that the rounded bottom of the hackle did not roll the fly onto its side.

Basically if you take your scissors and lay them along the underside of the body of the fly, then you can trim/cut away
the rounded part of the under hackle which is what makes the fly roll onto its side.

Alternatively, you can pull the fibres of the hackle back and to the side of the fly before you tie in the hackle.

Sorry , I can't provide a step by step,because I'm now up in Argyll, having just moved home and I'm having trouble tuning into BBC World News

Fotwin

#23 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 05:59 AM

Fotwin, in fact I did trim the rounded part of the hackle to have it sit flat as you mentioned. It was just after looking back at your photo, it appeared that yours was not trimmed.

Thanks for clearing that up.



#24 Fotwin

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 07:29 AM

What I always do when I have finished the fly is to sit it in a flat surface.
If it falls onto its side then I trim the hackle so that it is stable.

There are a couple of things you can do with the hackle.
Depending on the angle you cut the hackle will result in the fly sitting more level on the water.
The second is not to cut but splay the fibres to the side with your fingers to make it stable.

The last thing you can do with the hackle , but is a bit hit and miss is to use say an Indian cock
hackle with a good taper.
You tie the hackle in by the tip , convex up take it up the post and tie it of.
When you pull round the post the short hackles are at the rear and the long hackles are at the front near the eye.
I don't bother with this too often.

I do use other mayfly styles such as the haystack mayfly and occasionally the no hackle dun , whose makers names
have gone out of my head.

Best wishes

#25 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 07:57 AM

One last question/thought.

 

Are you using the Klinkhammer Extreme hooks. I tied mine on a size 16 Daiichi 1167 Klinkhammer hook and I think the length of the shank is a little short, placing the hook point too close to the wing tie-in point. It appears that the Extreme hook is longer and offers a greater space to tie in the wing.



#26 Fotwin

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Posted 04 June 2016 - 06:20 PM

Hi Fin

The Partridge Klinhammer Extreme hooks dimensions are almost spot on for this style of fly.

The distance between the kink in the hook shank and the eye provides a tying in distance for the wings ,
thorax and reverse paraloop hackle which really works .

The body length of this hook is spot on for providing the required body profile.

I think you can see the proportions in the photos.

I would give the Partridge Klinkhammer Extreme Hooks a go.
I do not think you will be disappointed.

#27 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 06:58 AM

Thanks.