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Finish knot to teach beginners on a jig head


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13 replies to this topic

#1 flyty1

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 02:05 PM

I am putting together a lesson on tying jig heads (mostly for spin/baitcaster fisherman). I want to demonstrate how easy this is and it occured to me that a whip finish may be too intimidating for someone just starting out. The single or double half hitch would be ideal- but a pen barrel isn't going to work over a bulbus jig head. Does anyone have an easy way to demonstrate a hand done half hitch? An instructional video would be preferred...Thanks Guys

#2 vicente

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 04:07 PM

Is this lesson going to be in person or on line? If in person, I imagine most fishermen would be able to figure out a half hitch pretty well and it wouldn't take long to help out the few that can't.

#3 Bruce Norikane

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 05:32 PM

this video is a little grainy, but it clearly shows a very simple half-hitch.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=6Btzn4nbBv8

 

For real beginners, a drop of super glue is very simple and bullet proof.



#4 mikechell

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 05:45 PM

Teach the whip finish.  It's the best knot for the job and worth learning.   A half hitch is just a single wrap whip finish.


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#5 agn54

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 09:33 PM

I'm with Mike, especially if it's in person. I tie a lot of buck tail jigs for saltwater and find hand whipping by far the best way for me to tie them off. I learned like lost from tying flies first, but jig tyers who don't fly fish would greatly appreciate such a useful knot that is often only known to fly fishers

#6 Poopdeck

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 06:27 AM

The whip finish is not a difficult knot to tie or explain. Just call it a snell knot so they won't be intimidated by the name.

#7 flyty1

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 05:22 PM

Thank you for all of the input. I am planning on a small demonstration/class in person and using a video should the students want to see the finish again when they are at home in front of the vise. I could do a combination hand & tool produced whip finish and let the students choose if they want to buy the tool or not. I am not so concerned about the in person session - it is always nice to have the additional reference available when the students are at home flying solo.

#8 phg

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 06:51 PM

...but a half-hitch is so basic.  You just make a loop and slip it over the eye of the hook.  Do that 3 times and pull it tight.  Add a drop of glue and it'll last the lifetime of the fly.

 

Since your raised this, I've started paying attention to how I do a half-hitch, to see if there is some trick to how I do it.  Basically, I make a loop on the tip of my index finger, pinch it with my thumb, slip it over the eye of the hook (and usually a bead) and pull it tight.  It's just too simple to need a video....



#9 JayWirth

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 07:23 PM

I replied to this Sunday using my tablet but I don't see my post.  I use a whip finish but use a scrap thread loop which finishes the collar giving a neater appearance than just a hand whip.  I have a few YouTube videos but this one shows the process

Good luck with the class.


"Everyone has a responsibility to not only tolerate another person's point of view, but also accept it eagerly as a challenge to your own understanding. And express those challenges in terms of serving other people."

Arlo Guthrie


#10 flyty1

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 09:28 PM

Thanks JayWirth...I guess I am so focused on fly tying that I had forgotten all about the whip finsh you suggest...it has been a long time since I wrapped a rod guide! I think your method is the winner and I can send the students home with a video for tying the whole jig (not just the finish knot)...Thanks again

#11 Poopdeck

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 11:00 PM

Im not understanding the difficulty in teaching a whip finish. The method jaywirth shows is certainly an option but I think it's the worst of the choices (no offense jaywirth). The traditional whip finish can be taught in minutes and is quicker and easier then the guide wrapping method.

When I was in the army they always had giant models of things like guns that they used to teach with. They were very effective and better then a video, or worse, a PowerPoint presentation. I think a large easily made jig model could be used to explain a whip finish which once seen is easily understood and remembered. If I was in the class I would want to learn the whip finish. Just my two cents.

#12 tidewaterfly

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 01:12 AM

I taught my youngest kids (twins) how to tie a whip finish by hand, with no tool, when they are about 9 or 10 years old and did so by showing them how to tie a jig. 

 

But, frankly, it may be easier to teach that to kids than adults.sad.png



#13 JayWirth

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 07:20 AM

No offense taken Poop.  I agree that a tier should learn many different techniques, including how to tie off with a whip finish using both hands & tools; this will serve the tier well when faced with different situations. As a boy of 12 I was first taught how to properly whip finish by hand after wrapping hook shanks for streamers; once mastered I was taught how to tie jigs.  The whip finish in the video is how I have been tying off a jig collar the past 38 years.  The technique in my example shows how to finish the collar ending with a handsome cone shape and cutting the tag close to the jig head adding to a clean profile.  Many tiers / fishermen are not concerned with the look of a jig collar and are mainly concerned with the durability and function of the lure - As fly tiers I doubt most of us look at a fly and not have the mental proportion chart flash in our minds (length of tail, wing length, head size, etc...).  I just happen to also have the mental size chart picture in my head every time I look at a jig.


"Everyone has a responsibility to not only tolerate another person's point of view, but also accept it eagerly as a challenge to your own understanding. And express those challenges in terms of serving other people."

Arlo Guthrie


#14 Al Beatty

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:58 PM

Hi flyty1,

All suggestions in this thread are good. If you want something really simple we'll share a trick Dave Whitlock shared with us several years ago. Once the jig (or fly) is ready to "tie off" just put a drop of super glue on about an inch of the thread close to the last wraps on the hook and take 2 or 3 more turns around the hook. Allow the glue to dry for about 30 seconds, then trim the thread from the hook. Take care & ...


Tight Lines - Gretchen & Al Beatty
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