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First Lures (not flies)


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32 replies to this topic

#1 TIER

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 02:54 PM

Okay guys, these are my first lures ever. Yeah, I know the paint job is messed up. I don't have the right paint.

IMG_20191027_1316338_rewind.jpg

A pink lipped popper. If you jerk on it and reel It will spin.

IMG_20191027_1847497_rewind.jpg

I frog imitation. Man am I bad at painting.

 


1. The captain is always right

2. It's the deckhand's fault

 

 


#2 mikechell

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 03:45 PM

1)  What are you using for paint?

2)  There's this technique ... it's called "learning".  Spend some time learning how to use the paint and brushes.  Then you can apply a better surface finish to your lures.  

 

Still haven't figured out how to take less blurry photos, huh?  It's hard for me to tell what your lures actually look like.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
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#3 utyer

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 03:53 PM

I am guessing that you are using a cell phone to attempt to take close up pictures.  Cell phone are for calling or texting.  Only a very few very expensive phones will take decent closeup photos.  Get an inexpensive point and shoot camera with a macro lense for taking close up pictures.  Set up a simple single color backdrop, and move in very close to your subject.  You must use PLENTY of light for good fast shutter speeds, and depth of field.   Browse through the photography sub forum to learn about lighting and background setups.  


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#4 flytire

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 03:59 PM

at least the out of focus photos makes the paint jobs bearable


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#5 TIER

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 05:01 PM

1)  What are you using for paint?

2)  There's this technique ... it's called "learning".  Spend some time learning how to use the paint and brushes.  Then you can apply a better surface finish to your lures.  

 

Still haven't figured out how to take less blurry photos, huh?  It's hard for me to tell what your lures actually look like.

1) Acrylic. In my lure making book it says to use lacquer. And I don't have any resin. I was thinking I about trading some of the useless junk I have in my room for something I would use. I got lots of chenille.

2) If I had the right paint they would look better.

I am going to buy a camera, whatever that gadget is that helps with pics, and a 6wt rod (all my rods are trashed.)


1. The captain is always right

2. It's the deckhand's fault

 

 


#6 flytire

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 09:31 PM

get some testors model paint or even fingernail polish and a good small brush


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#7 Poopdeck

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 10:58 AM

I hate always having to be the realist. Different paint won't make a difference. Neither will resin, a new camera or the camera thingy. I have to disagree with utyer (no offense) but cameras in cell phones are not junky cameras, they are one of the main selling features in a cell phone and manufactures are acutely tuned in to the younger generation and their overwelming desire to post pictures of every waking moment of their life on social media. In fact, to the average consumer, the stand alone camera is well down the path of obsolete. A more then acceptable picture can be taken with a cell phone with a photo editing app.

You have the book, you have have the desire, patience is all that is needed. It looks to me like you rushed the construction to hurry to the finished product. Take your time at every step in the process and don't rush to the next step until the previous is complete. All the great paint and gizmos in the world will not make a lack of prep work better.

#8 dadofmolly

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 11:48 AM

Have to agree with Poopdeck on camera and especially "take your time".  Prep makes a big difference.

 

I'm assuming you are making hardbody lures or from popper type foam.

 

Hobby paint or fingernail polish does a good job (several layers) if you have a good base coat.

 

Different size nails with head ground flat makes good eyes, spots, etc.  If you want scales, wrap lure in window netting and use a can of pressurized paint or stretch the netting in a frame and press the lure against the netting.  Using masking tape allows separation of colors.  There are several methods of spraying on the market but are expensive unless you are making LOTS of lures.

 

What book are you using?


<p>Instead of a sign that says 'do not disturb' I need one that says 'already disturbed, proceed with caution'

I don't call it getting old, I call it outliving the warranty

#9 tidewaterfly

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 12:45 PM

Tier, I also applaud your enthusiasm, but agree with what's been said about your lack of patience. I know I was the same way when I was your age, and the results of my tying & lure making were similar to yours early on. 

 

However, I improved, and by taking the time to "learn" to do things properly. That's all you really need.

 

There's not a thing wrong with using acrylic paints on lures, except for metals. They don't work well on metal. On wood, cork, and even some of the foams they can be great, provided you learn to use them properly. Check out the Lure building forum on Stripers Online (.com). Also check out Tackleunderground.com. Both have some awesome lure builders and you can learn a lot simply by reading what's already posted. There's also folks who will answer questions, but keep in mind that many are older & you'll have to be mature about how you ask the questions. 

 

For painting on wood or cork, prep as was mentioned, is vital! The end result starts with good prep. Such things as fingernail boards can work great for sanding, and a good primer/sealer helps with obtaining a smooth finish for the paint. All of this takes time to do, and is worth the effort, as the lure will look much better and the finish may last longer. I don't know what products you may available to you, but I use one called Kilz, which is made for priming before painting. It can be found in paint or hardwares here. They make two versions, one is oil based and one is acrylic. I've used both, but would use the acrylic based if using acrylic paints. A light sanding between coats helps the finish. As said, it's a learning process, and it takes time to do. Best thing is what you learn can be applied to lures or fly rod poppers if you make them. 

 

There's a tackle making forum on UltimateBass.com too, ( The "Tackle Box" forum) and plenty of guys there who will answer questions. It's a bass fishing site as the name implies, but again making lures is universal. 

 

I realize that you're not in the US and some of the information provided on these sites may not apply to you, but as far as tackle making, it's like fly tying and much of it is universal. I follow many online resources and there are folks from all over the world who contribute to them. 

 

I'm not trying to stear you away from here either, as this is one of the best resources around for tying, but it won't hurt to expand your knowledge base.

 

As far as camera's, I have an inexpensive Kodak point & shoot with a macro setting that takes some pretty good close ups. I've found it best to use a back drop, and as has been said lighting is very important. I take photo's often using a sheet of chartreuse green craft foam behind the fly or lure and that has worked well for a lot of photo's. 

 

I also take plenty of photo's with my phone, and although not as good as the camera, good enough for posting online. However, there's some "technique" in that too that makes a better or worse photo. Follow the advice here and read what's been posted in the photography forums. Again, patience! Take the time to read & learn! 

 

I realize too that you are a young man with very limited resources, and are attempting to do what you can with what you have. Unfortunately, that's only going to take you so far, and you will need to make purchases to continue to expand on this endeavor. It's the nature of the beast. 

 

I wish you the best with this too! I started out tying flies, and also got into making lures. It took me a long time to get better as I was in the same situation with very limited resources. Don't regret any of it, as I feel that fly tying & lure making can compliment one another and it never hurts to learn anything that you can, even if it does take awhile to accomplish! wink.png



#10 TIER

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 12:54 PM

Have to agree with Poopdeck on camera and especially "take your time".  Prep makes a big difference.

 

I'm assuming you are making hardbody lures or from popper type foam.

 

Hobby paint or fingernail polish does a good job (several layers) if you have a good base coat.

 

Different size nails with head ground flat makes good eyes, spots, etc.  If you want scales, wrap lure in window netting and use a can of pressurized paint or stretch the netting in a frame and press the lure against the netting.  Using masking tape allows separation of colors.  There are several methods of spraying on the market but are expensive unless you are making LOTS of lures.

 

What book are you using?

WIN_20191102_09_53_54_Pro.jpg


1. The captain is always right

2. It's the deckhand's fault

 

 


#11 dadofmolly

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 02:26 PM

Not familiar with that one.  Most public libraries have books on tying, tackle craft, etc.  Inexpensive way to gain some knowledge without laying out cash.  Also don't tie yourself to only one method.

 

I started making lures (probably younger than you) before tying and my first attempts were whittling chunk of pine.  A small wood rasp is good for shaping, sanding between coats and light sanding at very end (as mentioned by tidewaterfly) will give your lure a better finish.  So will 220 grit sandpaper or emery cloth.

 

"Tackle Craft" has some good info on lure making.

 

As you develop your skills, some steps that now take a great deal of time will become much easier and faster.  I also would recommend practicing things like painting the eyes or spots on a piece of paper or scrap piece of wood until you achieve the look you want.


<p>Instead of a sign that says 'do not disturb' I need one that says 'already disturbed, proceed with caution'

I don't call it getting old, I call it outliving the warranty

#12 Mark Knapp

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 02:40 PM

Tidewater, somehow you mistakenly came to think that TIER is not in the US. He lives in Alaska. Perhaps you meant the continental US. Either way, it doesn't mater, he has everything available to him that we all have, US or not.

 

His location is not his excuse, it's his haste to do everything, all of it, right now. In order to do things well, he needs to slow down, decide what he wants to do the most and concentrate on just a few things. When he has a handle those, then he can move on to other things.

 

James, we can't help you if we can't see what you are doing. My suggestion to you is like everybody else's. First, learn to take a good picture. After you do that we will be able to help you do everything else.



#13 SilverCreek

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 03:50 PM

 

Have to agree with Poopdeck on camera and especially "take your time".  Prep makes a big difference.

 

I'm assuming you are making hardbody lures or from popper type foam.

 

Hobby paint or fingernail polish does a good job (several layers) if you have a good base coat.

 

Different size nails with head ground flat makes good eyes, spots, etc.  If you want scales, wrap lure in window netting and use a can of pressurized paint or stretch the netting in a frame and press the lure against the netting.  Using masking tape allows separation of colors.  There are several methods of spraying on the market but are expensive unless you are making LOTS of lures.

 

What book are you using?

attachicon.gif WIN_20191102_09_53_54_Pro.jpg

 

 

 

I suggest you get this digital book, "Wooden Lure Making 101," with an Amazon account. The book is free and even if you do not have a kindle, you can read it online on your computer.

 

https://amazon.com/W.../dp/B01DMZI5E2/

 

The book is free and even if you do not have a Kindle, you can read it online on your computer with the Kindle App

 

https://www.pdfmate....ooks-on-pc.html

 

https://www.wikihow....oks-on-Computer


Regards,

Silver

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#14 Poopdeck

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 05:03 PM

I use the back side of drill bits for my eyes or circles. Works great and I have a set of every size I'll ever need for painting. Could use a few more for drilling.

#15 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 05:34 PM

This was my bible - all those years ago when I was learning to make lures (lures came first - then the fly tying...).  Yes, it's an old book but it does cover lots and lots of stuff.  TACKLE CRAFT by Boyd Pfeiffer... Bet you can find a used copy for almost nothing... 


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666