Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

How long does it take you to tie a fly?


  • Please log in to reply
113 replies to this topic

Poll: How long does it take you, on avg., to tie a dry fly? What about nymphs, etc.?

How long does it take you, on avg., to tie a dry fly? What about nymphs, etc.?

You cannot see the results of the poll until you have voted. Please login and cast your vote to see the results of this poll.
Vote Guests cannot vote

#46 jrock

jrock

    Bait Fisherman

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 11 June 2007 - 08:57 AM

It all depends on what type of fly it is it could take me 20-35 minutes on a fly ive never tied!!! i could tie a basic adams and wooly bugger in 5-10 min or less!!

#47 riffleriversteelheadslayer

riffleriversteelheadslayer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,224 posts

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:44 AM

standard catskill style I tie about 15 to 20 an hour

"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".--Thomas Jefferson

 

There is no such thing as a blank day for a fisherman. It will be saved for him by the white-throated weasel, who watches his fishing from a hole in the wall under which is lying a fish that refused all flies; or by the excitment of identifying insects; or by the apple-bloosom in a nearby orchard; and no one would call that day a blank on which he has seen a king-fisher." -- Arthur Ransome Rod and Line, 1929

 


 

 

 


#48 Al Beatty

Al Beatty

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,572 posts

Posted 12 June 2007 - 08:45 AM

Hi group,

Our tying speed varies a lot. If we are "cranking" out a comercial order then 3 to 5 minutes each is an average. On the other hand, when we are doing a magazine article or book chapter then 3 to 5 hours each is more realistic. As an example, two weeks ago we tied a short order for a customer which was 20 dozen assorted dry flies. Last week, we did 3 flies along with 1500 words and 12 photos each. Take care & ...

Tight Lines - Al Beatty
www.btsflyfishing.com

#49 Ribs1

Ribs1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 200 posts

Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:45 PM

I can tie a dozen Gartside Gurglers in a half hour.
Buggers, faster than that.
Any fly with spun deer hair takes about twice as long. A dozen per hour.


#50 ratfacedmcdougal

ratfacedmcdougal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 15 June 2007 - 06:41 AM

I used to tie commercially. Never on a full time basis but it still amounted to roughly a thousand dozen a year. If there is a standard for such a thing it's basically 5 minutes per fly or a dozen an hour for a standard trout fly or nymph. Some take a little longer or less depending on pattern or materials used. Remember though, that's TYING the fly. That means hackles plucked from capes and sized, materials all laid out and everything at the ready. I once took an order from the Orvis shop in Atlanta Ga. for some fly called a Sheep fly. 146 dozen in different sizes of one fly for one customer. I've never seen that pattern in any book since and have no clue what that man did with all of those flies. But by the time I finished that order I could tie that fly while watching TV and never even look down. By the way, since finishing that order I haven't tied that fly since hysterical.gif
But some patterns take longer than others. I may spend six or eight hours on a salmon fly. Or two minutes on a wooly booger or hares ear nymph.
I wouldn't worry with time though. Hopefully your not trying to work your way through school and add an extra package of ramen noodles to your pantry doing this and are doing it for the fun of it instead. I think the more important outcome isn't the time but the end result being the best quality fly you can produce and the satisfaction that comes with that.

#51 Isonychia

Isonychia

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,922 posts

Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:32 AM

I used to be in the sub-5 minute category with dries, but now that I've started tying "art flies" such as salmon flies and classic wets, I tend to take my time a little more -- even with standard dries and nymphs.

John
Offending the sensibilities of discerning trout since 1955

#52 The_Carp_Hunter

The_Carp_Hunter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts

Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:38 AM

Now that is very variable, I'll give you my fastest tie and the longest tie

Wooly Bugger 1.2 minutes

Art Stone about 60 hours

Average fly 2-3 mins

Xavier
Xavier Molina AKA The Carp Hunter

http://www.fliesonly.com.mx/index.php

www.moscasrealistas.com

Because the pleasure of imitating one life form doesn't gives you the right to end the life of another please C&R

#53 Moosie

Moosie

    Bait Fisherman

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 02:07 AM

Just keep at it, man, you'll get faster. I would recommend you get a book that details the many different techniques you'll need to learn, then keep tying flies using techniques that are new to you. There are probably many, but the one I used/use is 'A Benchside Introduction to Flytying' , I think by Leeson and Schollmeyer. It has a decent, though not exhaustive, assortment of patterns and a separate section of techniques which you can reference at the same time you are looking at the 'recipe' for a particular pattern. The most important thing, though, is to strive to keep learning not, necessarily, to tie faster, but better. As you get more into it, you'll run into problems or come up with questions, so just go look for answers. Whether in books, the internet, shows, other tyers, they're out there. Some will work for you and some won't. And try not to go more than a few days without tying, if you can, so you develop a 'muscle memory' of sorts. Before you know it, you'll realize you're not so slow anymore.

Good luck. And welcome to the addiction.

#54 zip

zip

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,969 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 06:53 AM

I clocked myself with a basic wooly bugger at 57 seconds.
But I tend to take my time a little more since I started tying salmon flies(which takes a helluva long time).
"They say you forget your troubles on a trout stream, but that's not quite it. What happens is that you begin to see where your troubles fit into the grand scheme of things, and suddenly they're just not such a big deal anymore."
John Gierach
----------
Sgt.Steve Bell USMC/Ret
Once a Marine,Always a Marine-Semper Fidelis

#55 WYKnot

WYKnot

    I may be retired....BUT YOU BETTER MAKE SURE YOU ARE ON TIME FOR MY SWAP MAGGOT...NOW DROP AND GIMME 20!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 935 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 11:40 AM

Let me see....find the right color of thread, find a bobbin, start the thread, it breaks, tie in again, get a cup of coffee, clear the bench to find scissors, go to the bathroom, get more coffee...I voted the >61 minutes. No wonder it takes so long to fill my fly box.
Russ Forney

#56 Bud Guidry

Bud Guidry

    Ragin Cajun

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,783 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 06:31 PM

man i must be real slow at tying flies. takes me between three hours and as long as three days on some flies. you guys tie up a dozen flies in the same time it take me to find the right hook, by the time i tie on the gut loop your fly boxes are full and your half way to the river.

Bud
Carp, the next white meat

i'm a friend, you can fart next to me anytime
but i'm also the muscle for the feather mafia

when a mans alone he does alot of thinking
when a mans with his friends he does alot of talking,
when a mans with his wife he does alot of listening
when a mans on a rivers he's content
when a mans with god he's at piece

#57 ratfacedmcdougal

ratfacedmcdougal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 06:38 PM

QUOTE(Bud Guidry @ Jun 19 2007, 06:31 PM) View Post

man i must be real slow at tying flies. takes me between three hours and as long as three days on some flies. you guys tie up a dozen flies in the same time it take me to find the right hook, by the time i tie on the gut loop your fly boxes are full and your half way to the river.

Bud


Yeah, and after all of that your flies look like poo.... you bait fisherman j_k.gif hysterical.gif

#58 Bud Guidry

Bud Guidry

    Ragin Cajun

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,783 posts

Posted 23 June 2007 - 10:43 AM

there you go rat , pickin on the newbie huh?

it's not my fault, i've only been trying to learn how to tie flies for three years but i think i figured out how to tie the string on the hook. i just used a bunch of half hinches.

Bud
Carp, the next white meat

i'm a friend, you can fart next to me anytime
but i'm also the muscle for the feather mafia

when a mans alone he does alot of thinking
when a mans with his friends he does alot of talking,
when a mans with his wife he does alot of listening
when a mans on a rivers he's content
when a mans with god he's at piece

#59 Batman

Batman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 465 posts

Posted 23 June 2007 - 10:52 AM

I've never timed myself, I guess it really does'nt matter, hell somedays I cant tie my shoes let alone tie a fly, cheers,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,B,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

#60 bent2cork

bent2cork

    Beginner

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 18 July 2007 - 01:33 PM

Greetings,

Just wanted to weigh in on the time question. Depending on the patern I can tie as many as six dozen an hour or as few as sixteen flies an hour. For my personal box I try to keep my patterns a simplistic as possible, most of those I can tie under three minutes.