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Sow Bug Pattern


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Max

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:57 PM

I will be fishing some water with sow bugs in it. I have been doing searches for patterns and there isn't much out there. dunno.gif Can someone help with some pattern ideas?

#2 Redwings1

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 01:36 PM

I would do a basic dark scud pattern, but instead of a flash back use something with no flash. Also I would say to use a dubbing loop and dubbing with guard hairs in it so you get a real spiky dubbed body...perfect for 'legs'
-Mike Schmidt of ANGLERSCHOICEFLIES.COM

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#3 cornmuse

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Posted 10 October 2006 - 03:17 PM

A sowbug is just a vertically compressed scud - wider than it is thick. In the waters I fish the sowbugs tend towards a dark grayish olive. A GRHE in that color and the appropriate size is actually a very good imitation, especially if you don't exagerate the thorax. If you want to tie something specific, a simple dubbed body of squirrely body fur the right color, ribbed with copper wire and trimmed along the back to keep it clean and tight. Take a little drop of flexement on your fingertip or bodkin and use it to smooth the top of the dubbed body (which should be made tubular) and create a little 'shell back'.

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Joe C.
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#4 Max

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 04:02 PM

Thanks guys.

#5 Blackotter

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Posted 12 October 2006 - 02:17 PM

There are two popular sow bug patterns in this neck of the woods and both can be very effective.

The first is the Ray Charles. I tie mine on a curved scud hook, tie in some pearl mylar and two strands of ostrich herl, wrap the herl forward, tie off, pull the mylar over the back and tie off, build a small head and whip finish. After tying a few of these, I added some very small wire as ribbing to reinforce the fly. Just be careful working it through the herl so it doesn't get pulled up against the hook and lose the fullness of the body.

The other is a soft hackle sow bug. Same hook, dub it tapered and then some dun softhackle.

Both easy to tie.

Popular colors are grey, tan, olive, pink and orange.

Both are very effective on the Bighorn and Missouri.

The orange always seems to be more effective during and after the spawn so I suspect that gets taken for an egg moreso than a sowbug.

#6 Blues Brother

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 09:45 PM

As with most flies, don't be scared to fish it small. I was fishing some sow bug flies on my local tailwater in about a 16 and caught nothing until I went to a 22.



~Bryce
~El Pescador~

#7 maddog48

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 10:26 PM

Do a Google search on "Too simple Ray Charles and see what you get. It's a basic Sow Bug pattern and very easy to tie. You can also just wrap grey mohair yarn and get a basic sow bug. Another easy one is ..

Mustad 9672 or similar hook size depending on size of the sow bugs in the area you're fishing

Weight: two pieces of lead tied on either side of the hook shank .. and only on the side*

Thread: Grey I use 6/0

Body: Grey ostrich herl

Head: Red Thread 6/0

Shell Back: Plastic sandwich bag or scud backing

Directions: I debarb the hook and place it in the vise. Start the thread and only weight the sides of the shank which gives a more natural profile and movement. After the lead is tied down and a thread build up is made, put a layer of super glue over the thread and lead. This will help re-inforce the ostrich body which is very fragile. Tie the herl on the end over the hook bend and tie in the backing material. Wrap the herl forward palmer style and let the glue sink in. At the hook eye, tie off the herl. Use a pliers if you want to flatten out the body. A swimming sow bug is flat and usually only humped when dead. Lay the backing over the back and tie down. I usually rib mine with the tag end of thread. When the backing is tied down, whip finish, add a dab of head cement if preferred and go fishing. If you have any questions, you can PM me or just ask away here and I'll see what I can do. I know these instructions aren't the clearest. There's also a way to tie on a tail if you want one.


Mike
Procrastinate now. Don't put it off.

#8 Curtis Fry

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 10:18 PM

Funny you should ask. I just finished a tutorial on a sow bug pattern that has been a killer for me over the years. My home water is infested with sows and I've fished them for 15 years now. Don't ask me why, but the red or orange in this pattern does make a difference. And I'm a big fan of feeding fish "steak dinners" when it comes to sows. I very rarely fish anything smaller than a #14. Guess that depends on your water, though.

Enjoy:

http://www.sweetflie...80/Default.aspx

(just click the "Sow Bug" tutorial).

Let me know if you have questions.

Curtis

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#9 flytire

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 04:44 AM

Ray Charles

http://www.flyangler...l/ac022304.html

#10 Max

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 05:24 PM

QUOTE(Blackotter @ Oct 12 2006, 01:17 PM) View Post


The other is a soft hackle sow bug. Same hook, dub it tapered and then some dun softhackle.



Blackotter,
I have seen this pattern before and I have heard it is a killer on the Horn. To me it doesn't resemble a sow bug very much. Any insight as to why this pattern works so well as a sow bug?
Thanks,
Max

#11 Max

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 05:26 PM

QUOTE(Curtis Fry @ Oct 16 2006, 09:18 PM) View Post

Funny you should ask. I just finished a tutorial on a sow bug pattern



Well done.

Thanks.

#12 Joe Hard

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 06:47 PM

The first time I saw a woven body fly I thought it would make a perfect sow bug, light and dark olive.
I have never tied a sow bug or a woven body fly. I wouldnt know where to begin to add legs. I just think the fat two tone woven bodies sort of look like sow bugs
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#13 ARFLY

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 11:43 AM

Here in the Ozarks we use a sow bug pattern that is really affective. I use a scud hook size 8 down to a 20. I use australian possum in shades from gray to tan and sometime with a little olive mixed in, depending on the water conditions and where I am fishing. The tail is 2 grey goose biots tied splayed out. The shell back is a piece of ziplock bag and copper wire for the rib. I usually weight mine with .015 or .020 wire. These are killer.

#14 Luke

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 08:04 AM

Here's a sow bug pattern from Ozark Anglers.

http://ozarkanglers....s...0&hl=Sowbug
Luke

#15 Blackotter

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 03:28 PM

QUOTE(Max @ Oct 17 2006, 03:24 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Blackotter @ Oct 12 2006, 01:17 PM) View Post


The other is a soft hackle sow bug. Same hook, dub it tapered and then some dun softhackle.



Blackotter,
I have seen this pattern before and I have heard it is a killer on the Horn. To me it doesn't resemble a sow bug very much. Any insight as to why this pattern works so well as a sow bug?
Thanks,
Max


Once it gets wet, the soft hackle is right along the body if the right hackle is used. It creates a very good segmentation effect that actually mimics a sowbug pretty well. I use Ewing hen neck.