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Nymphs For Bluegills


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33 replies to this topic

#1 breambuster

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 09:34 PM

I recently purchased a copy of Jim Schollmeyer's book, "Nymph Fly-Tying Techniques." I assume that many if not all of these patterns were designed to catch trout in streams. But my questions is this. Do you think that these flies would also be effective in a large reservoir and also in a small farm pond for bluegills? Are there certain patterns in the book that should be among the first that I tie out of this book?

Thanks

BB
Remember the 3 "R"s. Respect for self, Respect for others, and Responsibility for all your actions.

#2 Faster Fish

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 10:02 PM

bluegills will eat anything they can get thier greedy little mouths on.

Randy

#3 DaUP

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 11:21 PM

you said it they sure are pushy little guys

#4 nomad

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 07:47 AM

Yes they will work, most trout flies work great for all types of panfish.
"In wildness is the preservation of the world." -Henry David Thoreau

#5 wiggleminnow

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 08:07 AM

you only need two materials for blue gill, peacock and rubbers legs.

#6 flytire

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 09:22 AM

ANY trout fly will work for bluegills!

Bluegills = stupid!
Fly tiers sure have a way of making things complicated

#7 breambuster

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 10:40 AM

I know that there are many who denigrate the lowly bluegill, but in the warm waters of the South, where there are no trout streams, bluegills are about the only game in town. Of course, one can go after largemouths, but most of them are taken deep, here, with crank lures. Either plugs or rubber worms dragged along the bottom. There are no smallmouths either.

However, I have yet to find a fly that will take bluegills nearly as well as "Georgia Red Wigglers," but I'm still looking.

It might be interesting to note, however, that when things where going badly for the British troops during the Revolutionary War, King George wrote to Lord Cornwallis, stationed then at Charleston, SC asking if it was really worth it to continue the war. Lord Cornwallis wrote back to King George and said, "Yes, it's worth it to continue the war. If for no other reason, for the bream (Southern word meaning bluegills and other sunfish) that swim in the waters of Carolina."

So laugh if you will, but I will continue to pursue the lowly bluegill with a fly rod.

BB
Remember the 3 "R"s. Respect for self, Respect for others, and Responsibility for all your actions.

#8 flytire

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 11:44 AM

Try this one! Works all day long!

IPB Image
Fly tiers sure have a way of making things complicated

#9 Faster Fish

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 11:47 AM

Don't get me wrong, I love fishin' for the guys. I take my son bluegill fishing all the time. As a matter of fact, I am building him his first flyrod and we are going to use it to catch bluegill this summer.

Randy

#10 GHow

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 01:02 PM

Bluegill are not stupid. In numbers they are competitive but they can be selective. This is my Go To Fly until the top water bite turns on but you can fish it anytime of year. You can't beat it when the fish are holding in deeper water.
Don't put the bluegill down. They put a smile on a kids face and make me a happy man after I get home from work. biggrin.gif

My goal is to hook and fight a 2 - 2.5 lb BullGill on a 2 wt fly rod. I hooked and landed a Crappie this spring. This Papermouth was in 2.5 lb range and that was quite a battle.


Howie / Lake Congamond - West Suffield

#11 flytire

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE(GHow @ Dec 12 2006, 01:02 PM) View Post

Bluegill are not stupid. In numbers they are competitive but they can be selective. This is my Go To Fly until the top water bite turns on but you can fish it anytime of year. You can't beat it when the fish are holding in deeper water.
Don't put the bluegill down. They put a smile on a kids face and make me a happy man after I get home from work. biggrin.gif

My goal is to hook and fight a 2 - 2.5 lb BullGill on a 2 wt fly rod. I hooked and landed a Crappie this spring. This Papermouth was in 2.5 lb range and that was quite a battle.



Come fish for them in the Griswold/Voluntown area and you will see theyre stupid! hysterical.gif
Fly tiers sure have a way of making things complicated

#12 DaUP

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 05:30 PM

lets put it this way around here in the "untouched waters" you can catch them on a bare hook


#13 Steve P

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 03:50 AM

I too know waters you can catch them on a bare hook but you won't catch the big ones on a bare hook now by big i'm talkin' 10 plus inches. My go to for big gills early in the spring through mid summer just in different areas and water depths are dragon and damsel nymphs my biggest gills have come to me on those two flies late fall the big biters will go back to the damsel and dragon nymphs but your best fish in fall will most likely be on small craw patterns. Trust me I have devoted nearly five years to fishing for big gills and nothing else!!!! I love those guys they are so awesomeon a two weight my personal best was a 2lb 11oz red ear (on a fat dragon nymph size12) on june the 11th of 06 public water too.
Why fish for a nasty stinky fish like a trout when you can have real fun and catch a beautiful magnificent creature like a carp.

Check out my YOUTUBE channel for warm water flies and flyfishing how to.

#14 breambuster

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 10:36 AM

Steve, you sound like the kind of guy I'd like to share more info with. So far, one of my most effective flies has been the "Swamp Monster" which is a damsel fly imitation. Would you be willing to share the names and other info about some of the specific patterns you have been using?

Thanks

BB
Remember the 3 "R"s. Respect for self, Respect for others, and Responsibility for all your actions.

#15 luvinbluegills

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 11:54 AM

I haven't read that book but definitely concur that the biggest Bluegills in any bunch are going to be extremely selective more often than not. No fish gets to be top dog by acting rashly.

I agree that Dragon and Damsel fly nymphs are a great choice in hunting them, along with small leech patterns. You can work a patch of water that you know holds a vaiety of sizes/species and see for yourself the difference in the number of and power of the strieks by workign through a series of flies and resting the spot a few minutes between each one.

You'd think that by the time you get to number 6 the fish would ignore anything, but if you get to that right fly you could get tons more hits on fly number 6 than fly number one.
~Only be concerned with that which lasts, then go deep into the backing!
Adventures with Fish!