Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Easy Fly to tie


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 -=TroutMaster=-

-=TroutMaster=-

    Beginner

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 31 July 2008 - 01:51 PM

i was woundering if there is an easy fly that i could tie and if you could post pics and instructions that would be great headbang.gif
Tight Lines and Big Fish
-=TroutMaster=-

#2 Fred H.

Fred H.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,580 posts

Posted 31 July 2008 - 02:37 PM

There is a step by step coloumn on this site it has some complex and some easy patterns.
The easiest and the first pattern I ever learned was the wooley bugger.Look under " step by step"and look through it you may find some other easy patterns as well.
Fred
"My head is a prison, my times on the water are conjugal visits" Fred Hannie

visit my website http://www.realisticflytying.net

#3 peregrines

peregrines

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts

Posted 31 July 2008 - 09:22 PM

TroutMaster:

Here are some easy ones with step by steps. You might try some of these depending on what materials you have:

Some easy wets:
Olive Woolly Bugger
Bead Head Woolly Bugger
Orange Soft Hackle (use any color dubbing and hen partridge or grouse for hackle)
http://copperfly.net/wetflies.php

Some easy nymphs:
Pheasant tail Nymph
Gold Ribbed Hares Ear
Brassie
Zebra Midge
Goldhead bug
http://copperfly.net/nymphs.php

Some easy dries without dry fly hackle:
Peacock Caddis (peacock is great, or you can use any color body dub)
X Caddis
Easy Foam spider (for panfish)

With Dry Fly hackle:
Elk Hair Caddis
Griffith Gnat
Cahill Light and Adams Antron- you can vary body and hackle colors and even leave out wings if you want.
http://copperfly.net/dryflies.php

You might also want to check out your library to see if you could get a good intro book:
Fly Tying made Clear and Simple by Skip Morris
Benchside Introduction to Fly Tying by Tim Leeson

They both have good instructions, discuss materials and have a sequence of flies that will teach you a lot of different techniques as well as good patterns.

I would also develop a relationship with your local flyshop, and see if they offer tying classes, or can point you to a club that does. Start out slow with materials, and just buy stuff for one pattern (maybe in a few different colors/sizes) at a time. Your fly shop can also suggest substitutes for materials in patterns based upon stuff you already have.

Good luck!

peregrines

peregrines

#4 Dezod

Dezod

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 530 posts

Posted 31 July 2008 - 11:01 PM

From my experience, which is limited, there certainly are some flies that are easier to tie than others... That being said make sure that you begin tying flies that you will FISH! Depending on where you fish and what you are after there are too many different types of easy ties. The first fly I tied was a black wooly bugger, it has been suggested in the above posts, for me personally I rarely fish a bugger, so the 20 or so I tied up will probably last me forever because even though they catch fish I usually choose a different fly. Find a simple looking pattern that YOU fish and would like to tie, look it up here on the database or google it and then you decide if you think you want to tackle those steps. Then I suggest that because it is a fly that you fish you should buy the materials to tie that specific fly and then tie up enough that you feel comfortable in the steps and techniques which will inevidably spill over into a large number of other flies. The best thing I ever did as a beginning tier was to sit down at my vice and tie up about 40 copper johns in sizes 12-18 in 4 different colors. Repetition and the techniques I used have spilled over into almost every nymph I've tied since then. Enjoy tying what you enjoy fishing.

OK that was probably $0.04

C

#5 JSzymczyk

JSzymczyk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,507 posts

Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:18 PM

troutmaster- a woolly worm is slightly easier to tie than a woolly bugger (no marabou tail to deal with, just yarn or hackle fibers) and is an amazingly effective trout fly. It's a good fly for just about everything in fresh water in fact. My favorite is a #8 or #10 black with grizzly hackle, and a tuft of fl. red yarn as a tail. I can't even guess how many trout I've caught in streams and lakes with it over the years.

Does anyone know

Where the Love of God goes

When the waves

Turn the minutes to hours?


#6 carlp5351

carlp5351

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 421 posts

Posted 06 August 2008 - 10:04 AM

Charlie Craven's new book is out. It is called Basic fly tying by Charlie Craven. The book is awsome. The tutorials are great. For any new tyer to tying, It is well worth the investment.


Carlp5351

#7 -=TroutMaster=-

-=TroutMaster=-

    Beginner

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 14 August 2008 - 04:59 PM

I have been trying wollie buggers alot i would like to tie another type of fly with these types of materials

Green Maribou
Brown Saddle Hackle
size 6 hooks
6/0 thread
pearl flash
copper wire
Green Chenielle

that is what i have any ideas or patterns would be great!
Tight Lines and Big Fish
-=TroutMaster=-

#8 peregrines

peregrines

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 12:42 AM

Trout Master

How about this?

Marabou Damsel Nymph

http://www.westfly.c...boudamsel.shtml

You may want to give some thought as to where you want to go next... You could get one of those books mentioned above, or find a copy on beginning tying in your local library.

In the mean time you could:

Add some more stuff for black woolly buggers:
black marabou
black chenille
brass beads or spool of non-toxic "lead" wire for weighting some so they get deep

Add some stuff for marabou streamers:
pack of strung peacock herl
white marabou
silver cactus chenille

You can make simple but effective streamers on your #6 hooks. Good for bass and trout.
Body of silver chenille
Wing: black or white marabou
Wing topping: couple strands of peacock herl
Weight some with lead wrap before you put the chenille on if you want.

Good luck!
peregrines

#9 maddog48

maddog48

    I Am My River's Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,355 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 01:13 AM

Harry Mason has a great site .. troutflies.com. It has some great tutorials on anything from a basic pattern top the more advanced tie.


MIke
Procrastinate now. Don't put it off.

#10 airedale

airedale

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 405 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 09:55 AM

The most basic pattern in my opinion is a non weighted San Juan Worm. Just tie a piece of chenille length wise along the hook shank and you are done.
~Jim

"Don't look back... Something might be gaining on you!" - Satchel Paige

"Some respect the badge, but everyone respects the gun." - Al Pacino in "Righteous Kill"

#11 fishaholic69

fishaholic69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 496 posts

Posted 02 October 2008 - 01:40 AM

try some clouser minnows!!! you can get a variety pack of bucktail for like 5 bux and then get some pearl crystal flash and some bead chain from the hardware store for light bulb chains for the eyes. tie um up and have fun! you can make any colored ones to represent any baitfish around you and they ride hook point up so u don't get as many snags. I been fly fishing like a year and a half or 2 years and so far they have caught me steelhead, smallmouth bass, Largemouth bass, Rock bass, a carp,gills and even some catfish!!! also river chubs. the fish just love um and they are simple to tie!!!!
Owner of the The Great Lakes Fishing Forum
AKA GeorgeMcFly

#12 RJD31

RJD31

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 165 posts

Posted 02 October 2008 - 07:38 PM

TroutMaster

You might want to take a look at the beginning fly tying section by Al Campbell at flyanglersonline.com. He provides a nice introduction to tools as well as step by step illustrated instructions for basic patterns.

Ron

#13 troutkiller08

troutkiller08

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts

Posted 02 October 2008 - 09:24 PM

th easiest fly in the world to tie is a tadpole..... yo just find a dark olive or black feather..... any thin flexible feather of this colour.... marabou works well 2........ tie that in as a tail then just make your body to whatever size u want..... you can put little elastic legs on it if you want but it dont make that much difference biggrin.gif i hope this helps.... dont worry im a begginer 2
if fishing was easy they wouldnt call it fishing they would call it catching

#14 rockworm

rockworm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,983 posts

Posted 02 October 2008 - 10:03 PM

TroutMaster

I agree wholeheartedly with Dezod- You should make sure you are tying the flies you want to fish with. That being said, I suggest you tye a few spiders. (Not the 8-legged arachnids, but flies like Partridge and Green, Snipe and Purple, Stewart's Spiders, etc.) Not only are they great fishing-catchers, but this style of fly is simple to tye and requires few materials: a hook (wet or dry), thread (or silk), and a small feather. Step-by-Step instructions for Stewart's Spider and the Waterhen Bloa can be found at:

http://molecularwork...g/pl/p_tying.pl

Start with a relatively large hook (say #8 or 10), use tying thread for the body (whatever colour pleases you), and a feather which has fibers 1.5- to 2-times the hook gap. Although the best feathers for this purpose come from the leading edge of the wings (or sometimes the necks) of partridge, grouse, starling, moorhen, snipe, woodcock, etc., excellent spiders can be made using domestic hen neck feathers.

As you gain experience, you can reduce the hook size, substitute silk for the thread, and use more feathers from more exotic birds. I tyed my first spider 20 years ago- and it caught trout! I tye better spiders today- and they continue to catch trout. Hopefully, in 20 years .....

#15 fishaholic69

fishaholic69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 496 posts

Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:06 PM

I have tied a partridge and orange for a fly swap and people caught trout with them. I have caught gills and chubs with um.
Owner of the The Great Lakes Fishing Forum
AKA GeorgeMcFly