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getting to know a fly


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18 replies to this topic

Poll: getting to know a fly

how many of a fly do you have to tie before you think you know it inside and out?

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#16 Futzer

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 01:14 PM

Well to "really know" down to the exact number of thread wraps, tensions, material proportions, I say 100 dozen of the same bug, same size. Most tyers, unless commercial ones have never tied that many. I have several times in one production run. Yes most good tyers can successfully produce a pattern in a few dozen, but to really have it where you can almost tie the bug with your eyes closed, try a big run some time. Say one whole Saturday for 8 hours tie as many as you can of one fly. I guarantee by the end of that day you will see what I mean.

Cheers, Futzer.
Tie a man a fly and you give him fresh air, some exercise and a lot of fun. Teach a man to tie flies and eventually it takes over all free time, a room in his house and several thousand of his dollars.

#17 Andrews15r

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 12:25 AM

It depends on the type of fly, for instance I can usually just look at a dry fly and know what materials to use and tie it to satisfaction right away, but on the other hand I have been tying up a stone fly pattern and the biot is kicking my butt, so I still haven't gotten it down. I would say it completely depends on the type of fly.
"Some go to church and think about fishing, others go fishing and think about God."

~by Tony Blake~

#18 Futzer

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 12:44 PM

QUOTE (Andrews15r @ May 6 2009, 11:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It depends on the type of fly, for instance I can usually just look at a dry fly and know what materials to use and tie it to satisfaction right away, but on the other hand I have been tying up a stone fly pattern and the biot is kicking my butt, so I still haven't gotten it down. I would say it completely depends on the type of fly.



Hi Andrew, if the biot is for the body, sometimes I soak them in water to soften them before tying in. Cheers, Futzer.
Tie a man a fly and you give him fresh air, some exercise and a lot of fun. Teach a man to tie flies and eventually it takes over all free time, a room in his house and several thousand of his dollars.

#19 Hellgrammite

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:28 AM

I am in the "40 to 60" range, but the reason is pretty simple.

In terms of the "pattern", as far as what color wing, body, tails, wing case, blah blah, I still dont "know" most of the ones I tie all the time. I just peek in my little spiral notebook which contains my "recipies" for my flies. I have the memory of a
goldfish.

I tie 6 different "patterns" of dries intended to represent mayfly duns. 5 for spinners, etc etc. The individual "pattern" I need to look up, as far as colors of thread, etc. But as far as "what do i tie where, what do i tie in next, how far forward to start my hackle, etc" it took me 50+ flies to feel i was "good" at it, and probably more until I actually WAS good at it. My duns, spinners, nymphs, stoneflies, etc, are all tied exactly the same way. Just the size and colors vary.

If its a style of fly i am familiar with, and i just change colors or materials, I would be ok after 6 or so I would think. If its a totally new thing (i have never tied a parachute for example) It would be in that 40-60 range. If that makes sense...

For what its worth to any beginners, I started tying by doing nymphs, Hares ears in varying colors. Hundreds of the things. Good way to fill a box with stuff you can use and learn basic skills at the same time
I inherited an old violin and a painting, a Rembrant and a Stradivarius. It turns out Rembrant made lousy violins and Stradivari wasnt much of a painter.