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Hook point up or down?


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33 replies to this topic

Poll: Hook point up or down?

With respect to hook setting capabilities, When fishing streamers do you prefer hook point up or hook point down?

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When fishing nymphs. Do you prefer the hook point up or hook point down?

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When fishing dries, emergers, spinners, etc. Do you prefer hook point up or hook point down?

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#16 rich mc

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 06:46 AM

in regards to streamers . i have the hook pointing on top in the top half of the water column and clouser style on the bottom half . rich mc

#17 P.G. Beckett

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 01:32 PM

Fishing open water or surface water with no obstacles- hook point down. Near the bottom or with weighted flies or heavy cover- hook point up. Personally I cant't stand weed guards!

#18 stream urchin

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 02:14 PM

Dave Clouser in his book thought it important to smash the barb of any hook but especially so in hook up condition as this caused less damage to sensitive structure and tissues on roof of fishes mouth. BTW both he and Lefty feel you get more hook ups with barb pinched down.  If those were not an issue I like it better for the ease of release. You can keep the fish in the water twist your wrist and it's gone. Also pulls out of human flesh as well as cloth much easier.



#19 Phish

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:24 AM

Dave Clouser in his book thought it important to smash the barb of any hook but especially so in hook up condition as this caused less damage to sensitive structure and tissues on roof of fishes mouth. BTW both he and Lefty feel you get more hook ups with barb pinched down.  If those were not an issue I like it better for the ease of release. You can keep the fish in the water twist your wrist and it's gone. Also pulls out of human flesh as well as cloth much easier.

You meant "Bob" Clouser.



#20 Jimr1961

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:57 PM

Hey, stream urchin looks just like me!



#21 beanchuuu

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:30 PM

I will always tie mine hook down. I feel as though, naturally, the hook will have a tendency to roll down, and if I tie the fly hook up I am worried the picture I tried to create will be ruined. So I always tie hook down, unless it's a popper, with a mono hook guard.


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#22 Fisherboy0301

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 10:41 PM

Pinching the barb on a hook you plan to tie a point up fly on will also help the fly swim better. Think of the way a planer takes a bait down deeper, or the head of a lipless crank bait, the angle the barb creates catches water and forces the fly downwards, but if the fly is point up then the angle created forces the fly up towards the surface, if you pinch the barb, or use barbless hooks, then the fly will swim more naturally and stay in the area of the water column you want it to be in better.
"Yesterday is history, Tomorrow is a mystery, but Today is a gift, thats why they call it the present." - Anonymous

"Snakes are first cowards, then bluffers, and last of all warriors." - Clifford Pope

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#23 Philly

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:12 PM

Mostly hook point down, Clouser and Crayfish patterns, hook up.  I've done a few popper with a double hook, pointed up for weeds and lily pads.


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#24 JSzymczyk

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:42 PM

Pinching the barb on a hook you plan to tie a point up fly on will also help the fly swim better. Think of the way a planer takes a bait down deeper, or the head of a lipless crank bait, the angle the barb creates catches water and forces the fly downwards, but if the fly is point up then the angle created forces the fly up towards the surface, if you pinch the barb, or use barbless hooks, then the fly will swim more naturally and stay in the area of the water column you want it to be in better.

 

Really? 


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#25 Fisherboy0301

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 07:44 AM

I do believe so. I've read about and heard numerous times about the barb keeping the hook down, so in turn it should dork in reverse right?
"Yesterday is history, Tomorrow is a mystery, but Today is a gift, thats why they call it the present." - Anonymous

"Snakes are first cowards, then bluffers, and last of all warriors." - Clifford Pope

"To him, all good things -trout as well as eternal salvation- come by grace, and grace comes by art, and art does not come easy." - Norman Maclean  "A River Runs Through It"                                                                            

#26 JSzymczyk

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 08:14 AM

All other factors considered, no.  

 

The surface area of a hook barb which would resist the force of water moving against it is infinitesimal compared to the other design factors of any fly. 

 

You're talking about the rounded edge of a tiny hook barb, not the diving plane of a crankbait (lipless or otherwise).  

 

I'm not going to say it has NO effect, because EVERYTHING has SOME effect, but the effect is so tiny that it is completely overwhelmed by other variables-  not the least of which is the mass of the wire composing the hook bend.  

 

If your fly is constructed to offset the mass of the hook bend, the barb is going to have no real-world effect on how it rides.


the gales of November remembered...


#27 mikechell

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 08:23 AM

Yeah ... I must agree with JS on this one.


Barbed hooks rule!

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#28 Fisherboy0301

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 08:57 AM

Okay. :)
"Yesterday is history, Tomorrow is a mystery, but Today is a gift, thats why they call it the present." - Anonymous

"Snakes are first cowards, then bluffers, and last of all warriors." - Clifford Pope

"To him, all good things -trout as well as eternal salvation- come by grace, and grace comes by art, and art does not come easy." - Norman Maclean  "A River Runs Through It"                                                                            

#29 SILKHDH

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:23 PM

I am going to go with rich mc on this one. To me common sense tells me to go hook down in the upper water column and hook up in the lower water column. One exception is a articulated frog popper I make with the hook pointed up. This is to better be "moss less" more than anything. I want this fly to crawl across the moss bed like I would a fly crawling on the bottom of the lake. The weight of the hook only, and not the weight of the whole popper rides over the swampy "snot moss" better by being articulated. It works pretty well actually. No,I didn't invent it. And I'm talking "SNOT MOSS"

I must say I've seen some really cool looking parachute mayfly patterns tied hook up though. I don't know how well they ride on the water. Haven't tried so I have no right to say. But they look good. Looks aren't everything. Especially when it comes to flies. Boy don't I know it.

#30 SILKHDH

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:34 PM

I didn't tie this, but this is what I mean. On some of mine, all the materials are tied to the body and only the hook is articulated.

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