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Book Suggestion Inquiry


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Bullgill

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 08:14 PM

Hello everyone and Merry Christmas!

I have been looking for something for quite some time now and just have not been able to find it, thought this may be a good place to ask if there is such a thing.

I am looking for a book which would discuss and show photos of the various bugs that would live in Michigan lakes "or lakes similar to those in Michigan", specifically the warmwater type lakes that would be suitable for species like Bluegill.

Essentially I am just looking to learn about the diet of Bluegills and get some ideas for fly patterns to tie for them, plus would like to learn a little something about the organisms that make up the food chain on these types of lakes.

Does anyone know of such a book or resource?

Thanks in advance!

"Generally speaking, a howling wilderness does not howl: it is the imagination of the traveler that does the howling." ~ Henry David Thoreau

#2 JSzymczyk

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 11:02 AM

best way is to get yourself a mask and snorkel and get in there and see what is creeping around. If not that then make a net and do some sampling for yourself in the lakes you spend time on. Not much help for the middle of winter, and not much help on a book I know, but there is no amount of reading that will teach you as much about your water as a few hours of insect collecting. Most general insect field guides will have enough info to get you at least into the various genera of what you find, if not down to the species, and most have some basic info about how to do some collecting. See if you can find any biology eggheads at a local college or university. Check with your state DNR, most states have published surveys of every group of plants and animals found within their borders.

I just want to fish.


#3 EricF

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 02:08 PM

I agree with JSzymczyk. I studied entomology for years (almost became a taxonomist - talk about the most unemployable job on the planet). Anyway - for most insect groups knowing the family is more than adequate - getting down to the species is pretty specialized and what the "species" really is depends on when the family or genus was last revised. Get yourself a white enamel pan - a bedpan will do, scoop a pile of weeds throw it in there with some water and you'll be amazed at what you see. And not to dampen your scientific interests - but come on - these are bluegills - they will eat a piece of bark with a hook tied onto it!

#4 JSzymczyk

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 06:51 PM

QUOTE (EricF @ Dec 27 2010, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree with JSzymczyk. I studied entomology for years (almost became a taxonomist - talk about the most unemployable job on the planet). Anyway - for most insect groups knowing the family is more than adequate - getting down to the species is pretty specialized and what the "species" really is depends on when the family or genus was last revised. Get yourself a white enamel pan - a bedpan will do, scoop a pile of weeds throw it in there with some water and you'll be amazed at what you see. And not to dampen your scientific interests - but come on - these are bluegills - they will eat a piece of bark with a hook tied onto it!


LOL not really, you'd just have to spend the rest of your life as a tenured, pampered, piled-higher-and-deeper member of the intelligentsia at some institution of "higher learning"...

also, respectfully, I have seen times and places during major hatch periods where bluegills became as selective as any fish on the planet. It did not take an advanced degree to figure out what was going on, but if you didn't have an accurate imitation, they wouldn't even look at it.

I just want to fish.


#5 Bullgill

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 09:01 PM

Thanks guys, was essentially just looking for ideas for new fly patterns. Will have to grab a bunch of weeds and see what I can find in them come Summer.
"Generally speaking, a howling wilderness does not howl: it is the imagination of the traveler that does the howling." ~ Henry David Thoreau