Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Stonfo bobbin VS Rite bobbin


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Gustav F.

Gustav F.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 301 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 08:22 AM

As the title says I'm interested in knowing how you think these two bobbins differ. Pros and cons on each? Which one would you rather use?

/G
"Fishing is just en excuse for being there"

Common sense and a tint of moral is long sufficient.

#2 tonysurface

tonysurface

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 54 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 09:28 AM

I was going to purchase a Rite bobbin but was steared towards the Stonfo instead. I haven't used the Rite but was told by Dave Hise of Caster's Fly shop that the adjustment on the Stonfo is superior to the Rite. Stonfo has an numbered dial to adjust the tension. I think both bobbins are high quality products and you can't go wrong with either one. I still think the Tiemco Ceramic bobbin is probably the best I have used.I think it boils down to personal preferrence just like Dyna King vs. Renzetti.

#3 Gustav F.

Gustav F.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 301 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 09:58 AM

QUOTE (tonysurface @ Jan 10 2011, 03:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was going to purchase a Rite bobbin but was steared towards the Stonfo instead. I haven't used the Rite but was told by Dave Hise of Caster's Fly shop that the adjustment on the Stonfo is superior to the Rite. Stonfo has an numbered dial to adjust the tension. I think both bobbins are high quality products and you can't go wrong with either one. I still think the Tiemco Ceramic bobbin is probably the best I have used.I think it boils down to personal preferrence just like Dyna King vs. Renzetti.


Yes they both seem to be high-end products. Though the stonfo one is cheaper from were I can get it, but I don't quite like the big red plastic knob on the bobbin. Also I wonder about that steel-tube, how it is like compared to ceramic tubes.

I agree with you on TMC, they have the prime bobbins in my opinion.
"Fishing is just en excuse for being there"

Common sense and a tint of moral is long sufficient.

#4 tonysurface

tonysurface

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 54 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 10:04 AM

QUOTE (Gustav F. @ Jan 10 2011, 09:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (tonysurface @ Jan 10 2011, 03:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was going to purchase a Rite bobbin but was steared towards the Stonfo instead. I haven't used the Rite but was told by Dave Hise of Caster's Fly shop that the adjustment on the Stonfo is superior to the Rite. Stonfo has an numbered dial to adjust the tension. I think both bobbins are high quality products and you can't go wrong with either one. I still think the Tiemco Ceramic bobbin is probably the best I have used.I think it boils down to personal preferrence just like Dyna King vs. Renzetti.


Yes they both seem to be high-end products. Though the stonfo one is cheaper from were I can get it, but I don't quite like the big red plastic knob on the bobbin. Also I wonder about that steel-tube, how it is like compared to ceramic tubes.

I agree with you on TMC, they have the prime bobbins in my opinion.


The Stonfo fits nicely in my hand. I have big hands though. I haven't had any problems with the hardened steel tip. Once you get the tension right, it's a nice bobbin.

#5 perchjerker

perchjerker

    Advanced Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,274 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 10:15 AM

The question about steel versus ceramic tubes is moot as far as I am concerned. It must be remembered that steel tubes have been around since the day the first bobbins were made; whereas, ceramic tubes have been around for less than 50 years. Yes, there are those tiers who have ultimately cut grooves in the end of the metal tube with their tying thread; but,I would venture that those who have had this experience were commercial tiers who tied dozens of flies a day; day-in-day-out. Unless you plan on tying flies in comparable quantities, I doubt you will ever notice a difference between the two. And yes, I have both, as well as some with the ceramic inserts in the very tips and I can't see any difference of any kind. What is more important to me is the tube length; shorter for small flies; longer for large flies.

As it is your nickle, buy whatever floats your boat; not what will necessarily float any one else's.

Cheers,
perchjerker

#6 phg

phg

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 11:30 AM

I have a Rite. It is a very nice, well built tool, but it's a bit tricky to get adjusted correctly. Once setup and adjusted, it works OK, but, really, is no better than my ceramic wishbone bobbins. In fact, because of their ease of use I prefer to use the wishbones.

#7 Mr. Vegas

Mr. Vegas

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,910 posts

Posted 10 January 2011 - 03:34 PM

I have the stonfo and a rite bobbin. I have great success with the rite bobbin but it takes a second to dial in. I like the stonfo but I have 10-15 year old danville thread in 6/0 and I can't use the stonfo bobbin. the thread has a too thick off a spool so I can only get about a half a crack on it. It will com apart in my hand when I am tying. I do use the stonfo more if I am using 8/0 or smaller or with newer thread. But 75% of my thread is the older spools soo...
AKA---- Dustin READ MY BLOG :) http://dustinsflybox.blogspot.com/
Just picked up tying summer '10 and now I am hooked and a fanatic!!

If I can tie a fly ANYONE can!!!

Vouches Beginnerflytyer - day5 - rich mc - utyer - flytyer14- breambuster - letumgo- fly fischa

#8 Gustav F.

Gustav F.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 301 posts

Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:59 AM

Thank you for the information guys! If I'm gettting one of these it's leaning towards rite, but who knows what happens!
"Fishing is just en excuse for being there"

Common sense and a tint of moral is long sufficient.

#9 SILKHDH

SILKHDH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 409 posts

Posted 14 January 2011 - 11:28 AM

Rite bobbin has a new model where the tube is tapered on the exit end so you can half hitch with the bobbin. You can see it in action on there web site. ritebobbin.com. Is pretty neat I think.

#10 bowfin47

bowfin47

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 439 posts

Posted 14 January 2011 - 12:13 PM

QUOTE (perchjerker @ Jan 10 2011, 11:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The question about steel versus ceramic tubes is moot as far as I am concerned. It must be remembered that steel tubes have been around since the day the first bobbins were made; whereas, ceramic tubes have been around for less than 50 years. Yes, there are those tiers who have ultimately cut grooves in the end of the metal tube with their tying thread; but,I would venture that those who have had this experience were commercial tiers who tied dozens of flies a day; day-in-day-out. Unless you plan on tying flies in comparable quantities, I doubt you will ever notice a difference between the two. And yes, I have both, as well as some with the ceramic inserts in the very tips and I can't see any difference of any kind. What is more important to me is the tube length; shorter for small flies; longer for large flies.

As it is your nickle, buy whatever floats your boat; not what will necessarily float any one else's.

Cheers,
perchjerker

I have some Matarelli bobbins (non-ceramic tubes) that I've been using since the early 1980's. So, far I've only cut a groove in one of these and that was done with kevlar thread (which I no longer use). This groove was quickly and easily polished out with a small piece of emery cloth.

Co-Founder Classic Atlantic Bream Fly Society
Life Member - Federation of Fly Fishers

FFF Member Since '84


#11 Harold Ray

Harold Ray

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,720 posts

Posted 14 January 2011 - 12:19 PM



RITE™ STANDARD BOBBIN

• Ceramic Thread Tube
• Small Diameter Barrel
• Removable Vinyl Grip
• Solid Brass Arm
• "Click" Drag Adjustment
• 1-9 ounces of thread tension
• The most versatile of all fly tying bobbins
• Price $21.99

I have around 30 RITE Bobbins, some with steel and some with ceramic, and both do well. I prefer the ceramic, probably because I have used them so much. Thus far, I have never broken a tip. The dial on the end to adjust thread tension is inset into the handle and isn't as prominent as that on the Stonfo, but if you notice the Stonfo model is a new addition to their line. It looks like an exact knock-offs of the RITE, except for the adjustment knob, which appears nice, and possibly a slight upgrade. Thus far, I have never had a problem at all with tension adjustment on the RITE. They are quality bobbins I will continue buying and using.




Stonfo Elite Bobbin: Fly Tying Bobbins & Tools
stonfo-elite-bobbin
$19.95

The STONFO Bobbin appears to be a good bobbin, too, and the larger adjustement knob may help some. With the RITEs, I adjust tension with one finger; I would think you'd probably adjust with two on the STONFO, but that's no big deal. The STONFO is around $2.00 cheaper on the two sites I checked.

It doesn't appear to me that you can go wrong with either, but I plan to stick with the RITE Bobbin for my tying because, for me, they are tried and true!! I love the way they handle and work. I am a veterinarian. I have a lot of very nice instrumentation in my clinic, from surgery instruments to scopes and monitoring units. None of them appear to be any more well built than the RITE Bobbins, so that is a BIG plus from me. I love high quality, well made instruments, and RITE is one of those.

Ray
Ray Emerson, D.V.M.
419 Lake Air Drive
Waco, Texas 76710

E-mail: wacovet@yahoo.com

Phone: 254-772-3520, Cell: 254-744-2393

Web Address: http://www.emersonanimalhospital.com

#12 HalfDunn

HalfDunn

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 79 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 08:06 AM

Just received a Stonfo Elite bobbin. Seems well made and the tension adjustment is smooth. This is my first bobbin with tension control having use Tiemco ceramic before.  

 

Not sure if they are for me. With the sheer treads I use the steel shaft sticks out beyond the tension knob and is quite sharp in my hand. The numbers are pointless IMO.  Thread control is good and apart from the above gripe fits nicely in the hand. Personally I would prefer a slightly shorter stem.  Changing threads is time consuming.  

 

Will I buy another?  No.



#13 Crotalus

Crotalus

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 11:48 AM

Never used the stonfo but i have been slowly transitioning to the Rites.  I didnt notice much difference starting out, but now when i go back to one of the Griffins or Dr Slicks it is very noticeable.  Maybe I'll pick up a stonfo or two just to try them out.  as long as their thread control is on a par with the Rite then I dont think it will be an issue.


Joe
 

 

Please visit Predator Fly Outfitters.

8794809351_2a357d8e23.jpg
Predator Fly Outfitters


#14 Chase Creek

Chase Creek

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,543 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 12:08 PM

I guess I don't understand the reasoning behind an adjustable tension bobbin. When I tie, I vary the thread tension by palming the spool in my hand and the amount of "pull" I put on the thread. Different parts of a fly require different thread tensions. IMO, having the tension adjusted and controlled by the bobbin is asking for trouble (thread breakage). I see it as just kind of a gimmick. 

That said, I use the Rite bobbins just because I like the way the spool sits in my hand. The tension control is set just above the point that the thread would roll from the spool just hanging there. I also prefer the "Magnum" Rite cuz I feel I have better control and a longer reach, but that's just my preference. I also use the old "wishbone" bobbins with the arms bent out a little to ease the tension.

As with most tying tools, it's just a matter of preference, and what you get used to.

 

HalfDunn - With the Rite bobbins, the post goes from the outside in, so there is nothing sticking out in your palm. BUT, some thread spools (Griffith Sheer, Pearsall's) are too short and will not work without a spacer. For the Griffith spools, I cut the end off a plastic spool, Pearsall's spools require 2 spacers (one on each side) to center the spool under the tube.


"A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and
beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise"
Aldo Leopold

#15 HalfDunn

HalfDunn

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 79 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 01:09 PM

I guess I don't understand the reasoning behind an adjustable tension bobbin. When I tie, I vary the thread tension by palming the spool in my hand and the amount of "pull" I put on the thread. Different parts of a fly require different thread tensions. IMO, having the tension adjusted and controlled by the bobbin is asking for trouble (thread breakage). I see it as just kind of a gimmick. 

That said, I use the Rite bobbins just because I like the way the spool sits in my hand. The tension control is set just above the point that the thread would roll from the spool just hanging there. I also prefer the "Magnum" Rite cuz I feel I have better control and a longer reach, but that's just my preference. I also use the old "wishbone" bobbins with the arms bent out a little to ease the tension.

As with most tying tools, it's just a matter of preference, and what you get used to.

 

HalfDunn - With the Rite bobbins, the post goes from the outside in, so there is nothing sticking out in your palm. BUT, some thread spools (Griffith Sheer, Pearsall's) are too short and will not work without a spacer. For the Griffith spools, I cut the end off a plastic spool, Pearsall's spools require 2 spacers (one on each side) to center the spool under the tube.

Thanks Chase Creek.  I am with you on thread control.biggrin.png