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Fly Turner


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39 replies to this topic

#1 ninja115

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 06:09 PM

I recently tied my first epoxy head fly. I made a turner out of my wrist and my elbow. After using it for 5 minutes I realized that I should upgrade.....

I've done some searching and looked at plans to build a fly turner to dry my future epoxy flies(and poppers when I get to that stage). I'm pretty handy when it comes to fabricating things and it doesn't seem out of my reach.

My question is this: Which motor would work better/best to build it out of?
Microwave motor?
Can-Opener Motor?
Disco-Ball Motor?
or Other?

I have found Microwave and Can-Opener on Cragislist near me for $5-$10. Disco-Ball on Ebay for $16. I'm leaning towards the Can-Opener.

The only other alternative that I see would be Clear Cure Goo, but I like the thought of watching my flies dry for some reason. CCG may be what I ask for, for Christmas. Also, I don't want batteries, I want to plug it in.

#2 utyer

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 06:20 PM

I have a motor from an old oudoor grill that turns about right. Somewhere between 4 and 12 rpm is good.
"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#3 JSzymczyk

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 06:25 PM

IMO Microwave turntable motors are the easiest to mess around with. Usually around 5 rpm AC electric, just wire it and plug it in. Use some common sense and be careful with electricity, that should go without saying but I never underestimate the ability of people to get into trouble. If you ask friends and family there is a good chance you can come up with a microwave sitting in a garage or closet that they'll give you. Tear it apart to get the motor, and also get the cool magnetron magnets also-- usually there are two of them and they are donut shaped.

If you don't know what you're doing with electricity, ask someone who does, please.

I just want to fish.


#4 DoubleHaul

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 07:46 PM

I have one made from a can opener.
Works fine for flies and as a rod turner but it is loud. I'm looking to make another one...

#5 Kirk Dietrich

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 11:06 PM

For streamers with epoxy saturated heads, the UV products are good in they dry crystal clear and quick. Even if you get a fly turner, I would stay away from the 5-minute cure epoxy as it will yellow within a year, which the fish won't mind but worse, it will soften with extended use in the water/fishing.
The 30-Minute cure epoxy dries clear and stays hard but is challenging making a head on the floppy streamer materials. For poppers and clear coating other stiff materials and flies, 30- minute can't be beat especially for its price. I had poppers on SS hooks with acrylic painted heads coated with 30- minute cure epoxy that sat in fly boxes in two feet of Katrina water in my shed for a week and I still use them. Some of them have caught dozens of redfish and are still fishable. For poppers, 30-minute cure epoxy is the cure for a great finish. There is no product on the market at epoxy's price point that can beat it, hands down.
I plan on making a motor set up one day but am in no rush, when I do, I would like to get one with an on/off switch. For my current set up, see the second image below.

Kirk

I used to use this for years and years.
Posted Image

Then I upgraded to this and have been using it for the last fifteen years or so.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Every now and then, I'll make a video, wish I could find time to do more; here is the link:
http://www.youtube.c...et?feature=mhee

I've got a few folders with photos of flies, these get more updates than my videos:
http://s136.photobuc...rofile/kirkdiet

https://picasaweb.go...rich?feat=email

#6 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 06:45 AM

If you decide to go with a slow turning motor, I've always used barbecue rotisserie motors (and each one has lasted for years and years). They usually come in a small rectangular metal case that's perfect for mounting onto an "L" shaped or "T" shaped wooden bracket. Since they usualy come with a small square socket to mount a square rod, it's a simple matter to use a slightly larger wooden dowel, and carve the end square to fit perfectly. My turning motors were originally meant for rod drying applications (I've been building rods for 40 years...) and only later used for turning flies.... One other thought - if you think you might be doing any demonstration tying, a portable battery powered turner might be another option since it frees you from all the usual extension cord hassles that come with a standard turner when it's being used outside of your shop....
Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#7 ditz2

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 12:36 PM

I used a microwave turntable motor and it worked out great. simple to setup and is correct rpm. Free helped also.

#8 perchjerker

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 02:40 PM

The only downside to a rotisserie motor is that they are NOISY!! However, given their durability, I can, and do, readily put up with the noise. At least as long as I can hear the thing, I know it is on and running! Mine is substantial enough to turn the "cradle rig" I made for my rod turner that can hold 8 rod sections at a time. And the price was right!!!

#9 troutguy

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 03:04 PM

I got a free motor from an old xray machine. I made an "L" shaped wood frame and mounted the motor. I used an aluminum arrow shaft piece about 4 inches long to extend the motor shaft. I mounted a piece of closed cell foam from a packing container as the hook holder. The foam is NOT glued to the shaft. When I grab the foam it stops rotating allowing me to add a fly. The foam is tight enough so it begins to turn when I let go. If it wears out, I replace the foam. I used that 2 or 3 inch thick blue foam you see in crates and big boxes.

I like DC motors for safety. I used an old telephone or some other charger to power my motor. I am sure you have dozens laying around from old rechargable devices if you are like other homes.

The only thing I bought was a potentiometer from Radio Shack (volume control). That allows me to make my speed variable. The potentiometers are rated (full size)are rated for 120 volts.
Give a man a fish and you'll feed him for the day; Teach a man to tie flies and he'll pick up all the roadkill.

#10 ninja115

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 06:47 PM

I like DC motors for safety. I used an old telephone or some other charger to power my motor. I am sure you have dozens laying around from old rechargable devices if you are like other homes.

The only thing I bought was a potentiometer from Radio Shack (volume control). That allows me to make my speed variable. The potentiometers are rated (full size)are rated for 120 volts.


Did you dump the third leg of the potentiometer anywhere(Does it have a 3rd leg or is it a rheostat)? Does the DC motor tend to heat up when the current gets turned down real far? I like the idea of the spare charger as I have plenty of old AC->DC converters laying around. I could also put battereies in it then if I wanted to make it portable. What other DC motors spin slowly? Is there one I could get from a Craft Store that turns slowly? Or, Should I "accidently" break on of my mom's battery powered halloween decorations that are so pleasurable to my ears. I might have to wait a few months before I build my turner though if I did that.

Also, my parents won't give me their rotisserie and I'm not buying a new one for $20. I think I'm going with the used microwave for $10 if I can get it. Unless, I figure something out with DC. Maybe....I'll build two!

#11 ninja115

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 06:53 PM

I used to use this for years and years.
Posted Image


I saw this on another post that you wrote. I do like the simplicity behind it......And, I am also, intrigued by the popper with the hole down the center. How's the popper work for you? What's it made of(Foam, Balsa, Other)? Was it fun to paint and epoxy the inside?

#12 Kirk Dietrich

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 07:04 PM

Thanks Ninja. I don't paint or epoxy the inside hole. That particular bug is made from the tear dropped shaped hard foam Comel "perch float" - strike indicator for spin fishermen. The floats in the picture at the following link are the cigar shaped ones, which I cut in half to make two popper heads from. If you pass your cursor over the names in the left of the oval, you will see the other shapes they make. http://www.comaltack...og/peg_flt.html
I don't use the foam and toothpicks any longer but it does work for curing 30-minute cure epoxy. Believe it or not, you only have to flip it once or twice, maybe three times in fifteen minutes and it is set.

Kirk
Every now and then, I'll make a video, wish I could find time to do more; here is the link:
http://www.youtube.c...et?feature=mhee

I've got a few folders with photos of flies, these get more updates than my videos:
http://s136.photobuc...rofile/kirkdiet

https://picasaweb.go...rich?feat=email

#13 ninja115

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 07:21 PM

Niiiiccccccce! Have you ever tried shooting some of the Hareline Glow-In-The-Dark Hot Glue inside there for night fishing? Just an idea that popped into my head. I like to fish the bridges and docks at night when I'm in FL. Although being new to Fly Fishing, my rod has never seen the salt. Only the fresh water of Lake Erie's Steelhead Alley.

#14 Kirk Dietrich

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 09:02 PM

Ninja, can't say that I have tried glow in the dark hot glue. Don't fish much at night so you'll have to let me know how it works. Sounds like an interesting twist.

Kirk
Every now and then, I'll make a video, wish I could find time to do more; here is the link:
http://www.youtube.c...et?feature=mhee

I've got a few folders with photos of flies, these get more updates than my videos:
http://s136.photobuc...rofile/kirkdiet

https://picasaweb.go...rich?feat=email

#15 Finjunkie

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 10:28 PM

A good dryer can be made from a rod dryer motor.