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Best floating tail material


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12 replies to this topic

#1 todvan

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 05:44 PM

Hi all,

I am wondering what everyone thinks makes the best tails on small (size 16 or smaller) drys and spinner patterns when you want them to float best. Moose, elk, deer seems too big, microfibbets don't have much floatation. I have not tried paintbrush bristles. Any ideas for me to try? Thanks!
Fish on.....

#2 todvan

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 05:47 PM

Oops. Please move to the fly tying forum.
Fish on.....

#3 Mickalo

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 06:20 PM

you may want to try some Coq De Leon (CDL) for tailing material, seems to work great for many dry patterns and is becoming quiet popular as a tail material in many patterns.

Mike
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#4 riffleriversteelheadslayer

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 07:35 PM

Mike nailed it

"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".--Thomas Jefferson

 

There is no such thing as a blank day for a fisherman. It will be saved for him by the white-throated weasel, who watches his fishing from a hole in the wall under which is lying a fish that refused all flies; or by the excitment of identifying insects; or by the apple-bloosom in a nearby orchard; and no one would call that day a blank on which he has seen a king-fisher." -- Arthur Ransome Rod and Line, 1929

 


 

 

 


#5 blakejd

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:33 AM

I think it really depends on your application. You mentioned spinners which atleast with tricos I feel a sparse tail fish better. Also with tricos just based on most patterns the wings are as much of a flotation problem as the tails in most instances and they are often fished in calmer water anyhow. For rough water heavy hackled flies moose and elk will beat most. For standard mayfly patterns such as duns as has been mentioned I've become a bit partial to CDL. I fished most of the BWO hatches this fall with CDL fibers and loved the flotation and effect. I would put them at medium flotation and just a bit better than traditional hackle fiber tails. Another nice thing about CDL is the lenght of usable barb which allows for longer tails and are much easier to tie as split tails if you like.

#6 McGnat

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 09:31 AM

Get your hands on some spade hackle or find some chinese or imported rooster necks. The imported necks are not much for hackling a fly, but if you can look before you buy, you may find some that have nice stiff barbs of good length that are great for tailing material for dries.

#7 perchjerker

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 04:22 PM

FYI: tapered white nylon artist paint brush fibers and Micro Fibbetts are one and the same! Just different "packaging"

#8 SilverCreek

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 12:49 PM

Hi all,

I am wondering what everyone thinks makes the best tails on small (size 16 or smaller) drys and spinner patterns when you want them to float best. Moose, elk, deer seems too big, microfibbets don't have much floatation. I have not tried paintbrush bristles. Any ideas for me to try? Thanks!



I use microfibbets. Use a thread ball tying technique that spreads the microfibbets into a fan tail and they work fine.

http://www.garyborge...adams-fan-tail/

As noted above, microfibbets and artist paint brushes are identical. Note the tiny parachute fly below with the fan tail of paint brush fibers. Also note that I have cut fibers off the left side of the paint brush. Since the fibers are lined up on the brush, there is no need to "stack" the fibers before tying them in.

Posted Image
Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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#9 KCcarp

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 08:14 PM

I really like using deer mask hair, or microfibbets. They both provide decent "flotation" however, the microfibbets work much better for tiny flies (sz22-) as they are smaller in diameter. Also, microfibbets seem to be much more durable. The deer mask works quite well and is stiffer than deer body hair but still provides some flotation, as well as adding some realisim with the dark dips of the hairs. It can be a little on the brittle side though...

Hope this helps ya a bit!
-Ben

#10 Randyflycaster

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 08:24 AM

Still not sure: Do microfibbets float? Are they better on dries or nymphs or both?

Thanks,

Randy

#11 phg

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 07:07 PM

What you want is a fine, light weight, moderately stiff material that will resist breaking the surface tension.  Dry fly hackle barbs used to the the standard (Indian and Chinese necks).  Microfibbets also fall in this category.   It's not how buoyant the material is, but rather how well it can spread out the weight.



#12 SilverCreek

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:30 PM

Surface tension is what floats a fly.

 

Few "dry" flies, other than foam flies, float because they actually weigh less than water. As PHG says the float because the tail fibers spread the weight along the entire length of the fibers lying on the water surface.

 

For stiffness and thinness, I think micro-fibbets are great for small flies.

 

It is the surface tension, the trampoline effect of the water surface to bend but not break, that floats the fly.

 

LPBYF00Z.jpg

 

meniscus-support.jpg

 

 

 

Still not sure: Do microfibbets float? Are they better on dries or nymphs or both?

Thanks,

Randy

 


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#13 williamhj

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 04:28 PM

If you don't like microfibetts (what I usually use) then I'd just use the dry hackle you'd use on a dry fly.  Great use for larger feathers with stiff enough barbs.