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Fly Tying Bench - bluegill576


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#1 FTFFlyPattern

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 08:24 PM

The table is a cheap plastic folding table and I store most of the materials in the little drawers. I store my most used threads on the thread holder from joanns and my tools in the renzeti tool caddy. I also have my tenkara rod/line holder on the ledge above my tying bench.













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#2 wbz

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 03:05 AM

Nice setup
Nothing makes a fish bigger then almost being caught

#3 Horseshoes

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 07:53 PM

How long have you had the tintin poster?
 
When in Nova Scotia stop into JD's Bows & Guns

#4 zug buggin

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 08:05 PM

I used the desk form my kids old bunkbed combo, I mounted a light over the working area, I'm still using plastic storage containers for most materials having them seperated by type
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"Fly Fishing Is Not A Team Sport"----Tom McGuane

The fisherman now is one who defies society, who rips lips, who drains the pool, who takes no prisoners, who is not to be confused with the sissy with the creel and bamboo rod. Granted, he releases what he catches, but in some cases, he strips the quarry of its perilous soul before tossing it back in the water. What was once a trout – cold, hard, spotted and beautiful – becomes “number seven.”
Tom McGuane