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Spring trout flies


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14 replies to this topic

#1 rainbowkiller

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 11:23 AM

Hello Everybody!

I'm pretty new with fly fishing and was wondering if you had any great flies for catching trout this season.
Thanks!

#2 kentuckytroutbum

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 11:36 AM

rainbowkiller-

Wow! That's kinda an open-ended question. First, where are you located, and where will you be fishing? Is there a Bass Pro, Cabelas, or well stocked fly shop near to where you live? If there is, I would suggest that you go to these stores, and talk to the sales people. Usually, they have a pre-made box of trout flies, such as Eastern selections and Western selections. It should have a mix of nymphs, wets, and dry flies.

I could come with a laundry list of each type of flies, but that list might be overwhelming. Please get back to us, and give us more information.

Thanks

#3 flytire

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:21 PM

I'm pretty new with fly fishing and was wondering if you had any great flies for catching trout this season.


elk hair caddis

stimulator

parachute adams

foam hopper

stonefly

gold ribbed hares ear

pheasant tail nymph

san juan worms

comparaduns

midges

that list should get you started catching fish

theres a bazillion more patterns but not enough time to list them all.

do a GOOGLE research on your own for hatch charts for your local area.
Fly tiers sure have a way of making things complicated

#4 rainbowkiller

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:15 PM

Well, i live near Seattle. Also, I will be going fishing for rainbow trout. Does that help? And the nearest Cabelas is a 1.5 hour drive. I already can tie the Elk hair Caddis, Wooly Bugger, Adams parachute, and a few others. Are there anymore really important flies i need to catch rainbows?

#5 kentuckytroutbum

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:57 PM

I would add Griffiths Gnat, Royal Wulff,Prince nymphs, and Blue Wing olives.

#6 Ebrant10

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:23 PM

If they are stocked fish the royal coachman marabou streamer usually will take care of business.
Fishy fishy in the brook, fishy fishy bite my hook.

#7 rainbowkiller

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:43 PM

thank you!

#8 rainbowkiller

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:45 PM

I would add Griffiths Gnat, Royal Wulff,Prince nymphs, and Blue Wing olives.

What are Blue wing olives?

#9 JSzymczyk

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:15 PM

if you're looking at "put and take" stocked fisheries, keep it simple when starting out. A white marabou streamer with a tinsel body and a red hackle-barb tail will work as well as a royal coachman. A few yellow and orange egg flies will work when the streamer doesn't. Rainbows seem to like a bit of red too.

My all time favorite trout flies are simple woolly worms- not buggers. Easier to tie due to the very short yarn tail. Now I tie them with ice-dub bodies instead of chenille, but I don't catch any more fish compared to the chenille body ones. Tie them on 3xl hooks in size 12 to about 8 or even 6. Red tail, black, olive, yellow, or white body with grizzly hackle sized appropriately. I've caught trout from Maine to Pennsylvania to Alaska to Nevada and all points between on those. I've caught trout on those in high pressure areas during mayfly hatches when other people were killing themselves trying to be perfect. They just flat WORK. I don't go trout fishing without a box full of them. They are easy to tie so I am not hesitant to cast them into places with lots of snags- and lots of fish. I don't cry when I lose one (or six) because they are simple and quick. If you want to get fancy, a woolly worm with a peacock herl body can be a real killer.

Does anyone know

Where the Love of God goes

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Turn the minutes to hours?


#10 rainbowkiller

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:28 PM

if you're looking at "put and take" stocked fisheries, keep it simple when starting out. A white marabou streamer with a tinsel body and a red hackle-barb tail will work as well as a royal coachman. A few yellow and orange egg flies will work when the streamer doesn't. Rainbows seem to like a bit of red too.

My all time favorite trout flies are simple woolly worms- not buggers. Easier to tie due to the very short yarn tail. Now I tie them with ice-dub bodies instead of chenille, but I don't catch any more fish compared to the chenille body ones. Tie them on 3xl hooks in size 12 to about 8 or even 6. Red tail, black, olive, yellow, or white body with grizzly hackle sized appropriately. I've caught trout from Maine to Pennsylvania to Alaska to Nevada and all points between on those. I've caught trout on those in high pressure areas during mayfly hatches when other people were killing themselves trying to be perfect. They just flat WORK. I don't go trout fishing without a box full of them. They are easy to tie so I am not hesitant to cast them into places with lots of snags- and lots of fish. I don't cry when I lose one (or six) because they are simple and quick. If you want to get fancy, a woolly worm with a peacock herl body can be a real killer.

Wow. That really helps. Thank you!

#11 Bruce Derington

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:54 PM


I would add Griffiths Gnat, Royal Wulff,Prince nymphs, and Blue Wing olives.

What are Blue wing olives?

May Fly Family, check it out http://www.troutnut....e-Winged-Olives

#12 rainbowkiller

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:00 AM



I would add Griffiths Gnat, Royal Wulff,Prince nymphs, and Blue Wing olives.

What are Blue wing olives?

May Fly Family, check it out http://www.troutnut....e-Winged-Olives

Thanks

#13 H.Champagne

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:38 PM

The first big Caddis hatch each spring, nasal breathing only, i live for it.....
-Harold James Champagne II


"The best fisherman I know try not to make the same mistakes over and over again; instead they strive to make new and interesting mistakes and to remember what they learned from them." John Gierach

KAMIKAZE fly tying

#14 Will K

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:59 PM

ha - "first big caddis hatch every spring, nasal breathing only"... that right there is some seriously funny stuff!

I like to carry a lot of flies. Mostly because I like to tie flies and tying the same fly a million times would get dull, so I like to tie lots of stuff, and then try it out... That said, if I was forced into one fly, it would be a wooly bugger. Cant go wrong. The catch every species, they work fresh and salt water, they are easy to tie, they can be basic, or you can get fancy and add some rubber, dub the body, use a bead or cone, etc etc etc.

So, if you want to catch trout (and everything else) have a good supply of buggers ready.

beyond that:

Pheasant tail nymph
Picket Pin wet
picket pin streamer
cdc and elk caddis
stimulator
hopper or better yet, a giant, ugly fly like a chubby or chernobyl ant.
a few generic may fly's like those in John Barr's book (I'm spacing on his name for em)
A cream and an olive caddis larva
and a few basic midges like a zebra midge, but do some different colors in addition to black.

#15 Will K

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 01:01 PM

ha - "first big caddis hatch every spring, nasal breathing only"... that right there is some seriously funny stuff!

I like to carry a lot of flies. Mostly because I like to tie flies and tying the same fly a million times would get dull, so I like to tie lots of stuff, and then try it out... That said, if I was forced into one fly, it would be a wooly bugger. Cant go wrong. The catch every species, they work fresh and salt water, they are easy to tie, they can be basic, or you can get fancy and add some rubber, dub the body, use a bead or cone, etc etc etc.

So, if you want to catch trout (and everything else) have a good supply of buggers ready.

beyond that:

Pheasant tail nymph
Picket Pin wet
picket pin streamer
cdc and elk caddis
stimulator
hopper or better yet, a giant, ugly fly like a chubby or chernobyl ant.
a few generic may fly's like those in John Barr's book (I'm spacing on his name for em)
A cream and an olive caddis larva
and a few basic midges like a zebra midge, but do some different colors in addition to black.