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Midge pattern (questions)


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Jfish

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:31 AM

So I'm really new at tying. Been at it somewhere near a month. I have many materials that I'm aquiring and trying to figure out what I really want to tie.

So far I've been tying size 20 zebra midges. I have some different colored thread and a few different wires. I've been using Umpqua scud hooks (that come in qty 50) mainly. Sometimes I use glass beads I bought on ebay. Sometimes no bead, sometimes a bead and some dubbing behind it. They work well at the trout club under a pmx.

Anyway; my question is about different midge patterns. What material can I use to have a 'tail?' I bought some goose biots, grizzly hackle, lemon duck feathers, and I have some other things from a kit someone gave me.

I would also appreciate some other info on patterns for small midge nymphs besides the zebra/buzzer. Also interested in how to make a shiny bug back (that actually looks like a fly in green) like what's on a copper john from Orvis.

Thanks!

#2 flytire

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:55 AM

heres some midges

http://www.danica.co.../nfrechette.htm

http://www.danica.co.../rtakahashi.htm

http://www.danica.co...ela/jbarela.htm

http://www.danica.co...ven/ccraven.htm

http://www.danica.co...uran/jduran.htm

i wouldnt use biots for midge tails but just about anything else is ok. a lot of the flies in the above links do not have tails

buzzers

https://www.google.c...iw=1344&bih=678

copper john wing case

http://www.charliesf...cfm?parentID=17

#3 rockworm

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:07 AM

So I'm really new at tying. Been at it somewhere near a month. I have many materials that I'm aquiring and trying to figure out what I really want to tie.

So far I've been tying size 20 zebra midges. I have some different colored thread and a few different wires. I've been using Umpqua scud hooks (that come in qty 50) mainly. Sometimes I use glass beads I bought on ebay. Sometimes no bead, sometimes a bead and some dubbing behind it. They work well at the trout club under a pmx.

Anyway; my question is about different midge patterns. What material can I use to have a 'tail?' I bought some goose biots, grizzly hackle, lemon duck feathers, and I have some other things from a kit someone gave me.

I would also appreciate some other info on patterns for small midge nymphs besides the zebra/buzzer. Also interested in how to make a shiny bug back (that actually looks like a fly in green) like what's on a copper john from Orvis.

Thanks!


The shiny back on the Copper John is a strip of black Thin Skin with a single strand of flashabou (or similar flash) down its center, covered with a drop of epoxy. Midge larvae and pupae don't have a tail. But they usually do have a frilly little bit at the head that is the bug equivalent of gills. Although omited in most patterns, these are nicely represented by white ostrich herl. The adults also have no tail. But a bit of material can be tyed in at the end of the abdomen to represent the trailing shuck of a newly-emerged midge. Many materials can be used here: wood duck, ostrich, hackle fibers, and more. Good luck with your tying!

#4 Jfish

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 12:21 PM

I appreciate those links! I started to browse the different patterns. I wish that they had instructions on how to tie them.

Thanks also for the insight on what is going on with a midge.

I guess I'm also looking for information on small nymphs in general. I thought a midge was the definition of a small nymph.

#5 gpd4

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 12:45 PM

... I wish that they had instructions on how to tie them...



They sort of do. As a general rule, a fly 'recipe' is spelled out in the order the materials are used. First is the hook, then the thread, then the tail, body, etc. If you know what the finished fly is supposed to look like, you should be able to get close.
There is three times as much water on Earth as there is land. Any fool can see, God intended man to fish three times as much as he works.

Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat and drink beer all day.

#6 blakejd

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:05 PM

Check out Charlies Fly Box for excellent step by step patterns. He has several midge patterns. Just ask google how to find it. Also Are you tying true midge imitations or just small flies (often referred to midges if under size 18 or so). There are may small mayflies in the "midge" category. Check out such classic and easy patterns as the RS 2 or many of Pat Dorsey's patterns which are simple and effective.

#7 bpetersen

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:31 PM

I started adding a bit of peacock herl as a collar right behind the bead on the zebra. also a couple of strands of flashabou for a trailing shuck.

#8 utyer

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:36 PM

Midges don't have noticeable. The minute posterior appendages are not really tails. When you add a "tail" to a midge, you have something else. As Blake said many small mayflies are often called midges. Mayflies are found in very small sizes, and are often mistakenly called midges just because of their size.

If you are tying midges then don't add anything for a tail. If your tying tiny mayflies, then 2 or 3 tails should be part of your pattern. Use wood duck flank, or hackle barbs for tails on tiny mayfly nymphs. Micro fibbets are used on the RS2 patterns.
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#9 nick2011

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 06:06 PM

much like some of the copper johns, flasabou covered in 5 minute epoxy makes a nice back
nick sipe

#10 Jfish

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 08:08 AM

Thanks again for all the information. I guess what I'm wanting is just small nymphs in variety.

What is the 5 minute epoxy called that would work? I assume it's like the bug bond uv light stuff?

#11 flytire

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 09:21 AM

5 minute epoxy and bug bond are not the same

epoxy is not cured with a uv light

devcon 5 minute epoxy will work as will a thick head cement