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kayak fishing

thoughts on it

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16 replies to this topic

#1 nick2011

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 06:04 PM

I have been thinking of buying a kayak to fish out of instead of a float tube,i was wondering what people that have experience think about it. pros, cons, stability, ease of transport ect... any kayaks that work best. I was looking at a pathfinder it has built on out riggers for extra stability..

 


nick sipe

#2 JSzymczyk

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 06:45 PM

I am an avid Kayak Angler and think they outclass float tubes in every possible way, except perhaps if you plan to hike a long ways then fish.   I have two Wilderness Systems yaks, a Tarpon 120 (12 foot) and a Ride 135 (13.5 foot).    With the Ride, stability is not even a thought.   I always stand and fly fish from it.   No need for outriggers and all that stuff with a correct hull design for fishing.  I'm not comfortable standing in the Tarpon, but many people do.   When seated, you would need to try very hard to dump either one.  The Tarpon is a quicker, lighter, and faster boat than the Ride and possibly it is a better river yak than the Ride.  The Ride is ultra stable, easy to maintain speed when travelling, and a super fishing machine in everything but small streams.  I'm a fan of Wilderness Systems, but there are several other purpose-built fishing kayaks which are just as good or better depending on what your expectations are.

 

Sit On Top models are much more fishing-friendly than Sit In Kayaks in almost every possible way.   They are also heavier and generally slower.  There are exceptions to every rule. 

 

The FreedomHawk kayaks seem to have a pretty good following, but I don't have any experience with them.  IMO the built in outriggers are two more things to break or malfunction. 

 

Fishing specific SOT kayaks are going to be somewhat heavy and that figures into transport.   My Ride135 weighs about 80 pounds.  I have no trouble putting it on the roof rack of my car even with a wrecked shoulder and ruined back.  It is all about technique, doing it correctly, and staying strong enough to get out of your own way.    If you will be chucking it in the back of a pickup or putting it on a trailer, then it is no issue at all. 

 

There are no "cons" to kayak fishing in my opinion.  You won't be able to do as much open water Great Lakes fishing as folks in regular boats, but that is about it.   I fish Lake Erie in my Ride135 several times each year.   Got to play the weather and use your head.  You will be out in the elements, but proper clothing and common sense solve those issues. 

 

If at all possible, go to a decent paddle shop on one of their demo days and try to paddle as many different kayaks as you can.   Kayak fit and usability are very personal things.  Nobody can really tell you which one is "best" for you, but you can make some informed decisions.


Does anyone know

Where the Love of God goes

When the waves

Turn the minutes to hours?


#3 utyer

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 07:15 PM

The one day I spent trying to paddle a pathfinder in the wind was enough to change my mind.  Stability wasn't at all good with the outriggers retracted, and you have to retract the outriggers to paddle.   I bought a Nucanoe, and I am liking it a lot.  No expert, and like anything else, ride before you buy.  Lots of kayak dealers have test tanks, but a real on the water demo is better.  I tried 5 other kayaks before I tried the Nucanoe.  


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#4 atxdiscgolfer

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 09:09 PM

Does anybody have any experience using the Diablo kayaks?

Utyer- i heard that the nucanoes cant handle waves, would you say thats true or just a myth?

#5 utyer

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 10:02 PM

Atx,

 

By waves do you mean surf?  So far, I haven't been in the surf, I can get in enough trouble inshore.  The Nucanoe Frontier is a SOT with scupper holes (2,) so it will drain water that comes in during a surf launch.  I have no problem with boat wakes, or anything else that I have encountered.  


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#6 atxdiscgolfer

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 11:52 PM

Excellent i dont fish the surf either, think i may give the Nucanoe a test drive when i move to Galveston next month.

#7 nick2011

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 10:09 AM

Thanks to everyone for the insight, I thought there might be some good advice to come from this sight, I will consider all those thoughts when I make a purchase..


nick sipe

#8 Dirts

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 03:48 PM

I use a Wilderness Commander 140. Thats because I'm big and my dog always accompanies me in the back.
I have two rod holders on both sides which I use when trolling. I didn't check your age but I'm an old man and I have to put my boat on our Honda CRV which involves balance, bench press and then a toss into the J hooks. I even made a rack out of PVC off the internet but roof materials are not what they use to be. I had upright rack tie ons and went to the J racks. I was even considering cradle saddles which I like with rollers. I just wish that some one would come up with an idea so strapping down does not involve always putting straps on the inside over the kayaks. I have developed my own procedure for strapping on because of the height of my vehicle.
For two years I had a young adolescent fishing maniac that was my neighbor. I adopted him and he took my dogs place in the back and he would troll in the middle. We spend some very great times together just talking about conservation, the environment and life in general. I usually caught the fish and tried hooking him up with the same baits, but that was to no avail. To my sorry he moved away last year. I would have enjoyed introducing him to fly tying and fishing with the flies.
My son David who is handicapped uses an Our Towne. I reviewed his on line and when the going gets rough and I want him in shore five minutes ago because of weather; hes pulling into the landing before I get there. I even have raced him and he just laughs. I have had some fantastic moments in my Kayak seat with my four legged friend.
What I would suggest is before purchasing one you can rent one or in the spring here the local dealer takes all the models in his stock down to the local water on a Sunday. They provide you with paddles and floatation vests and you can try anyone one you want.
If your checking on a specific model search the model and type reviews.

#9 JSzymczyk

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 07:41 AM

I just wish that some one would come up with an idea so strapping down does not involve always putting straps on the inside over the kayaks. I have developed my own procedure for strapping on because of the height of my vehicle.
 

 

Dirts I use Yakima j-cradles and I put the straps through the top before loading the kayak.   I leave the straps full-length so there is enough slack to bring the doubled strap around the bow and the stern with no trouble.   When I have my Ride135 on my car, it's longer than the car and high enough that I can't reach over it.  This system works good, unless I forget to pre-string the cradles.  I can get them from the other side- unless of course I'm putting the second kayak on and forgot to run the straps! (one of those things which make you feel stupid...)

 

The Commander is a great boat.


Does anyone know

Where the Love of God goes

When the waves

Turn the minutes to hours?


#10 Bransford Game Fisheries

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 03:01 AM

We've had great success Kayak fishing for Bass around the UK, just have a Bic Bilbao which is perfectly stable in reasonable conditions and is easy to transport around, I bought a folding wheelset for it so I can load all my gear onto the kayak and tow it to the water then just fold the wheels up and put them in the back of it while I'm out


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#11 troutguy

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 10:25 PM

OK what ever kayak you buy, buy a good quality paddle. My first kayak was a Dagger Blackwater 11.5 andI bought an aluminum handle paddle that weighed 3 or 4 pounds. I tried a carbon paddle from a friend and immediately bought an Aqua Bound Carbon that weighed 2 pounds. If you paddle all day the carbon is more effective and less tiresome. If you paddle five hundred strokes you more 500 less pounds.

 

The Dagger floats in very in little water. It has a drop down skeg to keep it tracking well. I like it for river fishing.

 

Second kayak was a 12.5 ft Necky Santa Cruz that I bought so I could take a son fishing. The boat tracks better than the Dagger. It is more comfortable in rough water and waves. The Dagger tends to plow through waves. The Necky ride over them. My youngest son paddled it on a camping trip from Isle of Palms, SC around Capers Island and then around Bull Island.

 

My third kayak is an Old Town 17ft and it moves through the water. I have been 1/2 mile out in the ocean fishing. It is the fastest kayak from point A to point B. I used to go out from Murrells Inlet, SC through Garden City into the ocean to fish.  With a skirt waves do not get you wet.

 

Best advice is go somewhere that you can try a boat, no try many boats. I bought the last two boats used. I still have all three. I had a Yakima rack on a Nissan that would hold 4 kayaks.

 

I have a 2x4 piece of plywood with rug stapled to it. With two bungee cords it acts as a platform for my dog. We are going to give duck hunting a try with it this year.

 

I love fishing out of a kayak better than a canoe or a float tube.


Give a man a fish and you'll feed him for the day; Teach a man to tie flies and he'll pick up all the roadkill.

#12 TheCream

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:28 AM

A fishing kayak was the best investment I have ever made in fishing.  That's all I need to say, I think.



#13 shoebop

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 10:09 AM

I fish out of a kayak as well. But I prefer wade fishing in rivers the most. I find that fishing a wadeable (and fairly swift) river from a kayak too difficult so I have given up trying. I cannot navigate and fish at the same time. I do my kayak fishing in slow moving rivers and lakes and I love it for that. I also have an inflatable pontoon craft which much better suited for me to fish swifter rivers from. If I want to fish an area, all I have to do is stand up. I can fish upstream or down with ease. Getting in and out of a kayak is not so easy for me. But that's my problem. I can now access parts of rivers that used to be impossible to get to without a boat of some kind. On large tailwaters, I would try my kayak first with an anchor to stop and fish specific areas.

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#14 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 11:42 AM

<p>I have some questions re: kayaks vs. pontoons, but I have decided to start a new thread rather than post on this one so as not to draw&nbsp;&nbsp;nick2011's thread off-topic. &nbsp;</p>

"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#15 Trouser Trout

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 12:29 PM

I bought a Native Watercraft Ultimate 14.5 Tandem this spring, and often wonder why I hadn't done it years ago.  It is a cross between a canoe and kayak, and works awesome for fishing. 

 

Here is a picture of it.

Attached File  Kayak.JPG   38.6KB   32 downloads

 

 It is unbelievably stable, can carry as much stuff as I want, and only weighs 65lbs.  It has the capability to add another seat, but mostly its just me and the dog in it.  It tracks straight as an arrow, is easily maneuverable, and I have paddled against some pretty swift current without too much difficulty.  There are endless possibilities to accessorize it just the way you want with rod holders, fish finders, etc.

 

Here is a picture of me doing some smallmouth bass fishing in it.

Attached File  Me Kayak.JPG   128.2KB   45 downloads

 

Here is another one of me standing in it on the day I got it.

Attached File  Standing in Yak.JPG   48.5KB   32 downloads


If you can't make it look good, make it look obvious.

 

Fishing is a sport; therefore I am an athlete.