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Easy trout flies


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40 replies to this topic

#1 GG34

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 01:13 PM

Can anyone recommend any fairly "easy" trout flies to tie?

#2 Peterjay

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 01:43 PM

Are you referring to sea trout? Wooly buggers in the appropriate sizes and colors will catch anything, fresh or salt. It doesn't get much easier than that.



#3 heavynets

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:02 PM

Google images of "midge fly pattern". They are all very easy to tie and most have only one or two components.

#4 GG34

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:02 PM

Yes, sea trout. I tied a seaducer in chartreuse and Red. I was thinking on trying pink too. Any thoughts? They are size 2.

#5 utyer

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:29 PM

A plane old grizzly Seaducer is just the thing.  Real easy.  Chrystal Schminnows are also quite easy to tie. Size 2 is plenty, try some on a size 4 as well.  

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#6 GG34

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:51 PM

Thanks. I tied a Grizzly seaducer. Do you think feather proportion to hook size is important? I found a recipe that said about 1 1/2 the gap of the hook. Most saltwater feathers are Bigger than that.

#7 Peterjay

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 05:49 PM

If the hook is too small, the dressing might interfere with the fly's ability to hook a fish. If it's too large, the fly won't swim correctly. That said, there's a lot of leeway. If you go by what you see in pictures of patterns, you'll most likely get the proportions correct.

 

BTW - it's great to see blossom flies reinvented yet again. Wonder who got the credit this time around? 



#8 GG34

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 06:24 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Any other searcher patterns would be appreciated.

#9 GG34

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:24 PM

Utyer, Here is my version. I tied it using the same hackle cape as my trout flies. Your's looks a lot better. What type of feathers did you use?

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#10 ditz2

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:10 PM

I always thought of the seaducer as an almost neutral buoyancy fly that will sink to just below the surface and just hang there and maybe sink very, very slowly. Any thoughts about this. I see that beadchain is being added which should make it sink faster. Not that that is bad, just different.



#11 GG34

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 03:37 PM

I've seen it on most of the saltwater applications.

#12 tidewaterfly

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 05:54 PM

I've been tying an old pattern since I was a kid that is called a Seatrout Special. It's very simple yet works quite well. I don't have any pictures, but the recipe uses a saltwater type hook, ( O'Shaughnessy usually) in sizes from 4 to 2/0, black or red tying thread, a body of either flat tinsel or braided tinsel (mylar) tubing, gold or silver, a wing of bucktail & a soft hackle collar. The body can be wrapped tinsel or tubing, or the tubing can be placed over the shank & tied down on the ends. I like the wrapped body as it's a bit more durable & makes a slightly fatter body. In more recent years I've used the tubing with a holographic finish too.  

 

Typical colors are red collar & yellow bucktail or red collar & white bucktail, but any color combination you wish can be tied. I liked a pink collar & chartreuse bucktail version too. I usually add some Flashabou (pearl mostly) in mine now, even though it was not in the original. 

 

There is a similar fly with the same name in the first version of Lefty Kreh's "Saltwater Fly Patterns" book on page 6, that specifies Day Glow type mylar tubing for the body, with a section slipped over the shank & tied down at each end (red thread at the rear). The fly in Lefty's book is said to be originated by Tom Lentz.  I'm not certain if the fly I tie was originated by the same fellow or not as I learned about it in a magazine article many years before Lefty's book was published. Certainly possible it's the same fly, just different variations. 

 

Also, the same fly can be tied as a Bendback, which inverts the hook & aids in keeping it from snagging in weeds or a weed guard can be added otherwise. 

 

Even though it's called a Seatrout fly, it's a pretty good general purpose fly that will attract many species in both freshwater or salt.  smile.png



#13 GG34

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:20 AM

Tidewater, Amy chance you could dig up a pic? I can't find it in the net anywhere. Thanks for the info.

#14 tidewaterfly

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 12:23 PM

I don't have a picture myself, but found this:

http://www.flytyer.c...d=118&Itemid=83

 

Hope it helps! smile.png



#15 Panama Red

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:22 PM

In the winter time I like clouser style flies and craft fur shrimp with small/med dumbbell eyes to get where the trout live.  In the summer I like baitfish patterns and seducers…That one you tied will do very well.


The Fisherman Formerly Known as FatzFlatz...Joined:04-February 06