Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Small jig type fly hooks


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 robow7

robow7

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 04:57 AM

Just curious how others might make use of these small jig hooks, any patterns in particular that you like tying specifically with this design and what advantages do you see, assuming the hook rides up? better hook ups, less hang ups?

As always, thanks for your input.

 

6794.Jpg



#2 Crackaig

Crackaig

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,270 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 06:33 AM

I just don't see the point of them. The threads I learned to tie with were not the superfine ones we use today. Pearsall's was fine by comparison. If you used too many wraps you would quickly fill up the gap of the hook. Now we have much finer threads someone launches a hook pattern to do the same. Yes they fish upside down; as does any down eye hook if you tie it on with a turle knot, first tasking the line through the eye from the wrong side. To me paying for extra hooks to achieve something, which you can do with hooks you have, is a waste of money. These hooks are usually made with quite fine wire. Yet they are intended for fishing deep. If you use a heavy hook you don't need to put so much weight on them to produce a fly of similar sink rate. Using a stronger hook gives you the advantage of playing a fish on a stronger hook.

 

Therefore, I must ask what is the point of these hooks? I only see disadvantages to them . However they are fashionable..Yes I tie on them, but only for customers who insist on them. None find their way into my fly boxes. Until I see they give me something more than I can get from hooks I have a plentiful supply of I will not be buying any for myself.

 

Cheers,

C.


"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical
minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which
holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd
by the clean end"


#3 Bimini15

Bimini15

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,325 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 07:49 AM

I have only seen them used in some fly patterns, with hourglass eyes, to make the point stick up high.

IMG_0495.PNG
Bimini15

#4 FIN-ITE 34

FIN-ITE 34

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 575 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 08:11 AM

Yup, I have less snags when tight line nymphing and my hookup percentage appears at least to me to be greater using the jig hooks. Especially when using them as my point fly.

 

You can tie any nymph pattern on them if you want, but I stick to the standard "tie in the round" patterns such as the Frenchie and other Czech style jig nymphs.

 

 tungsten-pheasant-tail-hot-spot-jig-nymp

 

With regards to the JS2 jig hook that you show, I recently wrote a review that has not been posted on the JS site. I had high hopes when I heard that JS was going to carry a jig hook in its new JS2 hook line. However after receiving my order I was a little disappointed as these were my observations.

The hook is at least a 1x or close to a 2x hook length when compared to other nymph jig hooks and the hook sizes run 1-1 1/2 times larger than standard nymph jig hooks.

 

For a jig hook at the same price point as the JS2, I would prefer the Allen J100BL.

 



#5 heavynets

heavynets

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 08:32 AM

Here are some flies: https://www.bing.com...ies&FORM=HDRSC2

The shape and the thin wire helps ensure that the fly can ride hook point up with either a smaller shot size or with a fly of higher dynamic center of gravity.

#6 JSzymczyk

JSzymczyk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,366 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 08:47 AM

 or with a fly of higher dynamic center of gravity.

 

and then when you tie it on a heavier tippet, or fish it in differing currents and depths- drastically changing the load applied to the fly by the leader (even in "dead drift"), or your leader has 2.5 more turns of twist than it did on your previous cast which causes your fly to drift off-axis, or any of a billion or more variables come into play, that all gets blown to hell.  

 

Buy, tie on, and fish with whatever hooks make you happy- but don't fool yourself with minutiae compared to real world circumstances.


the gales of November remembered...


#7 carpflyguy

carpflyguy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 10:52 AM

As others have said, for tightline nymphing. With a slotted bead, they ride point up and get snagged considerably less that conventional nymphs.

#8 carpflyguy

carpflyguy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 10:57 AM


 or with a fly of higher dynamic center of gravity.

 
and then when you tie it on a heavier tippet, or fish it in differing currents and depths- drastically changing the load applied to the fly by the leader (even in "dead drift"), or your leader has 2.5 more turns of twist than it did on your previous cast which causes your fly to drift off-axis, or any of a billion or more variables come into play, that all gets blown to hell.  
 
Buy, tie on, and fish with whatever hooks make you happy- but don't fool yourself with minutiae compared to real world circumstances.

Lol, the thing about tightline nymphing is you are dealing with these circumstances. One diameter of tippet, one water seam, etc.

#9 Hatchet Jack

Hatchet Jack

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 11:01 AM

"Yup, I have less snags when tight line nymphing and my hookup percentage

appears at least to me to be greater using the jig hooks...."

 

 

I've had similar results as FIN-ITE 34.

The 'snags' tend to come free with a good pull.

I especially like the barbless Hends brand.

Horribly sharp point.

Very easy on the trouts, just back the hook out with a hemo and they're off.

 

No experience with the JS2's though.


Always quit when you're through.


#10 GC59

GC59

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 566 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 02:55 PM

Although with another brand, I had good luck with black stones tied on this type of hook. But I read on another blog that jig hooks because of the hook riding up, usually the hook point is driven through the roof of a trouts mouth where a main  artery is located causing the fish to bleed to death. Has anyone heard about this or know if its true? I did not have this happen to fish I caught with this hook but it did end up in the top lip often.  



#11 FIN-ITE 34

FIN-ITE 34

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 575 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 03:22 PM

A top jaw hookup is where you want to hook a trout, and that is where next near to all my hooks wind up with the jig hook. When you stick a trout in that hard upper mouth area they are usually on there to stay, even using barbless or pinched barb hooks as I do on all my flies. I mostly tie sizes 12-18 in jig hooks, so there is very little deep penetration of hooks with those sizes, so your concern, true or not, is non-issue.



#12 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,775 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 04:12 PM

And I tie those jig hook flies, or for that matter standard tackle jigs, with a loop so they can swing free. I am a firm believer in the Uni or Duncan knot and when drawn up tight to leave a loop between knot and eye I've yet to have one slip back down. I do also use this if I want a tight knot also, just slide it down to hook eye or swivel to tighten against it.

 

I get my hooks here  http://www.allenflyf...thin-wire-hook/  and have been very happy with them. They don't pull straight but will break on a snag so they're not soft and if you buy 4 packs you get a nice discount on them.



#13 JSzymczyk

JSzymczyk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,366 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 08:39 PM

But I read on another blog that jig hooks because of the hook riding up, usually the hook point is driven through the roof of a trouts mouth where a main  artery is located causing the fish to bleed to death.




they can't put anything on the internet that isn't true.

He's a French model.

the gales of November remembered...


#14 Piker20

Piker20

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,257 posts

Posted 03 December 2016 - 08:40 PM

I use jig hooks for chasing mini species from sea but for fly fishing I have not found a great benefit to them.
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#15 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,775 posts

Posted 04 December 2016 - 12:12 AM

I tied these just for the fun of it while I had a bunch of jig hooks laying around. All but the pheasant tails in there are jig heads with either tungsten or brass beads.

DSC01604_zpsj5wcfjan.jpg

DSC01607_zpsz1pcedgy.jpg

DSC01606_zpsbiqmov3z.jpg