Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Dubbing Loop


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 FreshH20

FreshH20

    Beginner

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 12:29 AM

I seem to have more luck and better results using a dubbing loop rather than just spinning the dub on the thread. Is there a down side to using loops, other than speed? 



#2 Troutbum11

Troutbum11

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 371 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 12:40 AM

It depends on the fly your tying. If you want a buggy looking nymph or creating bulk on a streamer body then dubbing loops are awesome! But I would not use a dubbing loop for a dry fly when I need a tightly compact dubbed body. Dubbing loops are awesome, I use them a lot. I don't think there is a downside. They just have their time and place to be used like anything else.


Psalms:121

 

Check out my YouTube channel and Facebook below for more fly fishing and fly tying content:

 

YouTube: https://www.youtube....yI7Grak33rl-lrw

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook...bluelineangler/

 

- Ryan Cooper


#3 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,147 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:39 AM

learn both techniques - dubbing loop and directly to the thread. practice practice practice :)

 

you should also learn the split thread dubbing technique

 

these days, you can put just about anything inside a dubbing loop 


my two favotite words: senior discount


#4 Dave G.

Dave G.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,763 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:41 AM

On small flies a dubbing loop may produce too much dubbing or body material. In cases where less is sufficient in other words. If you are having trouble getting dubbing onto a single strand of thread maybe try some dubbing wax. Or sometimes for instance wetting the thread with saliva can help.


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#5 Chris_NH

Chris_NH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:03 AM

Time is the big down side.  If you don't need the bulk or bugginess that a dubbing loop offers then it's best to avoid that technique.

 

Most issues stem from too much material being applied to the thread. Try using a lot less material and just color the thread, making it only 2x or 3x as thick as the thread.  And get into the habit of keeping the material tightly wrapped on the thread by tightening it up with another spin with your fingertips after every wrap or two if it's the type of material that starts to separate itself from the thread as you wrap.



#6 JSzymczyk

JSzymczyk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,363 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:10 AM

One method is not a substitute for the other.   For some unfathomable reason, most of the people I have seen who have issues with dubbing want to apply pressure to the dubbing IN BOTH DIRECTIONS while twisting it onto their thread.   Twist your fingertips in one direction only.  


the gales of November remembered...


#7 mikechell

mikechell

    Cold weather afficando- Give me Snow or give me death!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,034 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:15 AM

Since I only tie flies on size 10 or larger hooks, I always use loops.  I have never been able to get a proper "noodle" with touch dubbing.  I always get a dubbing spiral around the thread.  I've tried ... oh, how many times I've tried ... but I just can't get the dubbing to twist up on the thread.  In fact, I tried it on this one:

Attached File  Richmond Flies 20.JPG   129KB   0 downloads

but gave up and did a loop.

 

I've watched videos ... even seen a guy do it at the Rendezvous ... But it just doesn't work for me.

 

I can understand that it will add too much material, if I need to tie a smaller fly.  I hope I never live where I need to tie smaller flies !!!

 


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#8 Dave G.

Dave G.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,763 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:16 AM

Adding to what has already been said, one might try this: if you intend to reverse wrap the dubbed thread onto the hook shank, then twist the dubbing onto the thread to the left, if forward wrapping the dubbed thread onto the shank then apply the dubbing to the thread wrapping to the right.


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#9 Dave G.

Dave G.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,763 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:19 AM

Since I only tie flies on size 10 or larger hooks, I always use loops.  I have never been able to get a proper "noodle" with touch dubbing.  I always get a dubbing spiral around the thread.  I've tried ... oh, how many times I've tried ... but I just can't get the dubbing to twist up on the thread.  In fact, I tried it on this one:

attachicon.gifRichmond Flies 20.JPG

but gave up and did a loop.

 

I've watched videos ... even seen a guy do it at the Rendezvous ... But it just doesn't work for me.

 

I can understand that it will add too much material, if I need to tie a smaller fly.  I hope I never live where I need to tie smaller flies !!!

 

I've done this ( what I'm going to say) with a regular rotary vise Mike and it kicks it up a notch, but I suggest you watch how Norm Norlander does it with his NorVise. You improvise things well, watch his video then improvise ! Watch here :   https://youtu.be/39xvJCfd4Js


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#10 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,147 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 08:33 AM

Adding to what has already been said, one might try this: if you intend to reverse wrap the dubbed thread onto the hook shank, then twist the dubbing onto the thread to the left, if forward wrapping the dubbed thread onto the shank then apply the dubbing to the thread wrapping to the right.

 

why? whats the advantage??

 

i dub the thread to the left (clockwise direction when looking down the thread) and then i wrap forward to the eye . no problems

 

one direction works for me whether i reverse or forward wrap the dubbing noodle to the eye


my two favotite words: senior discount


#11 Dave G.

Dave G.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,763 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 08:43 AM

 

 

i dub the thread to the left (clockwise direction when looking down the thread) and then i wrap forward to the eye . no problems

 

one direction works for me whether i reverse or forward wrap the dubbing noodle to the eye

 

But you know what you are doing. If a guy has loose dubbing on the thread ( I know, he should learn to get it on tight) then this helps it tighten as the wraps go onto the hook as the thread twists. I agree there is no substitute for a nice tight noodle but inexperience takes a while to over come.


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#12 TheCream

TheCream

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,619 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 08:59 AM

learn both techniques - dubbing loop and directly to the thread. practice practice practice smile.png

 

you should also learn the split thread dubbing technique

 

these days, you can put just about anything inside a dubbing loop 

 

It's all applicable, definitely worth learning as flytire said.  I, personally, don't use a split thread method much because I don't like to have to be so precise with the amount of material in my loop.  If there's a tad extra material, with split thread method, it kinda has to go somewhere.  I'd prefer it be in a loop so I can trim off what I don't need/want if I have excess. 



#13 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,147 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 09:04 AM

as with a dubbing loop and trimming off the excess, you can do the same thing with split thread dubbing technique (splitting hairs i guess :))

 

to the OP, learn as many techniques that you can then eliminate the ones that are not suitable to you


my two favotite words: senior discount


#14 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,147 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 09:07 AM

yes i do know what i'm doing but most dubbing will tend to loosen up after 1-3 wraps forward and must be retightened on the thread before continuing to wrap forward (watch a davie mcphail video and youll see him retighten the dubbing often)

 

so does reverse wrapping the dubbing noodle forward tighten the dubbing thats already on the thread??

 

again, heres a good article on dubbing techniques

 

https://thelimpcobra...iques-tutorial/

 

watching norlander applying dubbing is quite unique and made possible by his higher rpm spinning head on his vise. there are no other vises that i know of that can achieve that rpm. you cant spin a renzetti that fast :)


my two favotite words: senior discount


#15 FreshH20

FreshH20

    Beginner

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 09:19 AM

Thanks, most of the comments make sense. I will try using maybe 1/3 the amount of dub that I use when using a loop and see if I have better success with the noodle. So far I can say I don't like the wax.