Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Cortland "MICRON" fly line backing


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Hatchet Jack

Hatchet Jack

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 07 October 2017 - 11:10 AM

Does anyone out there know if this is a hollow core woven Dacron?

I'm re-doing some fly reels and need to know if this backing lets one

make a blind splice loop.


Always quit when you're through.


#2 Bimini15

Bimini15

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,820 posts

Posted 07 October 2017 - 11:47 AM

I do not think it is, but, honestly, mine is so old that I do not remember well enough.
Bimini15

#3 spiralspey

spiralspey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 07 October 2017 - 04:04 PM

I've seen it done with 30 lb micron. I assume 20 lb would work too, but the guy that I saw demonstrating the splicing technique said it was much more difficult with the lighter stuff. I've personally never used a splice in backing, but I have in hollow braided running line and it's pretty nice.

#4 Rocco

Rocco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 894 posts

Posted 07 October 2017 - 04:50 PM

Are you asking about a loop  with a hollow 'stem ' that fits over the fly line tip 'monkey sleeve' style,  or one that is formed by using a piece of backing fixed to each side of the fly line tip by a shrink tube? 

 

Micron is very thin and would probably not be a good candidate for the former loop system.  I use Cortland braided mono for these loops -- 30lb for smaller diameter fly lines and 50 lb for thicker lines.  Secured by barrel knots with super glue. 

 

Micron probably would work for the shrink tube loops but its very thin diameter might make for a 'hinge' instead of a continuous smooth energy transfer. 

 

When I use MIcron I do it by directly attaching it to the fly line tip by means of a barrel knot. 

 

Good luck and let us know how it works out.  

 

Rocco



#5 Hatchet Jack

Hatchet Jack

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:00 PM

Rocco, woven hollow core Dacron is the backing used for decades, then came along the Spectra/Dynema zero-stretch type lines.

 

One can fashion a loop on the backing, using a bobbin threader and a wee jar of finely tuned elbow grease ☺

 

The backing is pulled back into itself with a bobbin threader, then pulled back into itself again, thus locking the loop.

 

Once you've done a few, it goes fast and a big plus is that the fly line loop/backing loop junction goes through the fly rod guides fairly easily. Carp can show you that connection right quick, so can a mad goose....

 

I've got a hunch you're bang-on regarding Cortland's Micron and it's thinness. It's hard to tell from their advertisements if it's a 'solid' woven line, or other.

 

 


Always quit when you're through.


#6 Capt Bob LeMay

Capt Bob LeMay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,216 posts

Posted 08 October 2017 - 06:03 AM

Just about all dacron lines can be spliced (although they're not quite the same as "hollow core" lines which are actually designed to lay flat on when wound on a spool..).  The classic method uses something like a bobbin threader, but is actually a bit simpler (and a bit longer than a bobbin threader).  You just double a light piece of solid trolling wire (stainless steel leader - a good brand is always Malin's...and we generally use a #5 wire) about five or six inches long with the bend made sharp, like it was just a single piece of wire -then thread the doubled end up into the braid (starting about six inches from the end of the braid - then pulling it out about three inches short of the end).... finally working it out of the side of the braid, where you'll work it out of the braid - then pick up a loop and pull it back through...  The "big game" anglers using classic dacron loaded reels will actually do two separate in and out splices on their lines for extra strength - I've never felt it was necessary on fly line backing.

 

The main feature of Micron is that it's a bit thinner than ordinary dacron, allowing you to load a bit more backing (this was long before super braids came along and kind made the advantage of Micron moot...).  The fact that Micron has a bit thinner diameter makes it a bit more difficult to splice in the fashion noted above...

 

For many years I've used 20lb Micron as backing for reels for 8wt or 7wt lines - then standard 30lb dacron as backing for bigger reels.  I've never felt the need for "needle" splicing on backing.  Like many saltwater types I simply do a Bimini twist in the end of the backing until I have a 12" loop - then double the loop with a surgeon's knot to bring it down to about a 6" loop overall, which is mated loop to loop with the loop in the end of the fly line.  By the way that six inch loop in the backing allows me to "un-loop" any fly line connection by simply passing the reel through that "six inch loop".. -pretty handy.... For what it's worth I've never found the bimini and loop to loop connections the slightest problem when fighting a big fish on fly (we routinely catch and release tarpon up to 40 lbs on very light 8wt gear - then also do the same with their big brothers -fish well over 100lbs on 11 or 12wt rods..).  These kind of battles may see the backing connection going out and back through the guides with heavy pressure for over 30 minutes - or even an hour...   I do my best to try and aid my anglers to be able to beat any fish we hook  up in less than one hour - since the longer the fight goes on - the less chance you have of winning the fight....


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666