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Looking for an advanced fly tying book


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16 replies to this topic

#1 JoeLePaul

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 08:06 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I have been tying flies for 15 years now. My first book was The Flytier's Manual by Mike Dawes and I still love it even today. I also have the Benchside reference for manuals to all techniques. However, what I am looking for, is an advanced book with many different fly patterns (in color images) as well as a "buying list" which materials have been used for these patterns - with less of a focus on technique (similar to most patterns in Dawes' book). Ideally, it would be a book where you could look up the material and then it lists all fly patterns that can be made with this particular material. There are so many materials I rarely find fly patterns for. Mole dubbing for instance. Or blue jay. However, I am explicitly not looking for streamer patterns. Everything else (dry flies, wet flies, nymphs...) is fine.

 

Do you have any book recommendations for me?

 

Thank you for your time!

 

Cheers

Joe

 

PS: And if you could tell me which are the best vises for flies on small hooks (I do not tie saltwater flies/streamers) on the market at the moment, I would be grateful to you even more - I am looking to update mine wink.png



#2 cphubert

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:04 PM

Other than the Fly Pattern Database on this site I do not know of a book referring material list to fly patterns listed by material used. As far as pattern books most are for flies for the targeted type of fish, my most used are the Dick Stewart & Farrow Allen series Flies for trout, steelhead, salmon, bass & panfish, and saltwater. These 5 paperbacks cover many flies to get you started. There are many pattern books and online references today, you may not need any books. As for material you decide what to use or substitute for your method or desired outcome. mole dubbing, beaver or other natural or synthetic dubbing. There are books on classic materials and uses and modern substitutes. I recommend keeping a notebook for your patterns that you tie, and play with the material  you use to make your flies, you can list hook type and size and material used by type and color and tail/ hackle length so you can duplicate your favorite patterns consistently. most patterns are derived from other fly patterns and customized and "improved" by us to meet the needs of the fisherman or tier. Have fun with it



#3 Gene L

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:16 PM

I'd get a pattern book.  Lots of good videos out there on techniques, though.

 

For years, I had a problem posting hair wings until I saw it on a video.  Now I still have problems posting hair wings, but no longer care. 



#4 Patriot

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:17 PM

I've used a Renzetti for years, but there are many fine vises.  I've been lusting for a Snowbee, but my wife has told me not to even think about it.  Yes, dear, ...



#5 Patriot

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:35 PM

I know you were asking about an advanced book on fly tying, but for what it's worth to you, these are my thoughts on the matter.

 

I have a lot of books on the subject, but IMHO, books are limited to what lies between the covers.  I'm not saying that is bad, but your skill level remains static, again, IMO.  I still refer to some of my old books such as Randall Kaufmann's Tying Dry Flies.  His nymph book is good also.  Gary LaFontaine's Caddisflies is a classic and worth the read.  My go-to entomology reference book is Aquatic Entomology.  I have many others, but these are my usual day-to-day reference reads.  I know there are many, many others, so this is just a very abbreviated list of all the in-print info that is out there.

 

The last fly I tied was back in the 90's sometime and have just now gotten back in the 'groove',  so to speak, of fly tying.  What I have discoverd upon my 'return' to fly tying is that there is a TON of information in: (1) this website and (2) in all the YouTube videos that are available - for free!  

 

YT was a shock to me after I discoverd all the content and knowledge that was available for just taking the time to watch. I also learned about all the latest tying techniques - and gear, that was not available 10-15 years ago.  Books, IMO, will definitely get you started.  No one can argue with that, but I believe that YT videos normally stay at the cutting-edge of the business.  Add to that all the brain's you can pick in this forum.  You can't loose.

 

Check out Davie McPhail, Oliver Edwards, Kelly Galloup, Bram van Houten, Barry Ord Clarke, SMHAEN, Shane Stalcup, Hans Weilenmann, Makflies, Rim Chung, William Ensiferum, Rog and Jane Klettke (great entomology and tying info) and on and on and on.  This list truly is unlimited.  These videos have opened my eyes to invaluable knowledge which has improved my tying immensely.  They can also so very humbling, but as they say - no pain, no gain.

 

Best of luck.



#6 Kimo

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:11 PM

Five books I would suggest with some advanced techniques.
Much of these are for realistic flies but the concept still applies.

Steve Thornton - "Listen to the River"

Paul Whitlock - "Flies as Art"

Shane Stalcup - "Mayflies Top to Bottom"
Oliver Edwards - "Flytyers Masterclass"

John Barr - "Barr Flies"
These five are innovators in their own right and came up with new techniques
to tie their flies as well as materials.

Kimo



#7 Patriot

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:23 AM

@Kimo

 

Oliver Edwards 'FlyTyer's Masterclass' is a beaut.  It was sitting right in front of me and forgot to mention it.  

 

I'm still trying to perfect his partridge feather legs.  Practice, practice, ...



#8 Dave

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 02:15 PM

Best vise for small hooks in my opinion is the HMH with the midge jaws.  It's limited to size 18 and smaller but has a long pointed jaw allowing maximum access to the hook shank.



#9 flytire

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 07:57 PM

Is the original poster looking for a book on advanced fly tying or a vise???

Ignorance can be educated....

Crazy can be medicated....

But there's no cure for stupid


#10 Patriot

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 08:14 PM

Is the original poster looking for a book on advanced fly tying or a vise???

 

It appears both, but he has not responded to any posts that I know of.



#11 flytire

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 07:08 AM

oh okay :)

 

W4uNbmC.jpg


Ignorance can be educated....

Crazy can be medicated....

But there's no cure for stupid


#12 Patriot

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 09:31 AM

oh okay smile.png

 

Perfect!  LOL!



#13 SilverCreek

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 12:06 PM

https://www.amazon.c...n/dp/1571882081

 

61Ree4RlO%2BL._SX383_BO1,204,203,200_.jp


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#14 utyer

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 04:11 PM

Books first:  I have over 100, and that's after giving a couple of dozen away.  They all have something to say, and NONE of them say everything.  In many cases, the materials listed are what the author used at the time, and just one of many options that would do the same thing.  Through the years, new products come, and some fade away.  A couple of patterns that at one time used mole fur are the the "Blue Dun Hackle," Iron Blue Wingless," and the "Iron Blue Nymph," all from The Art of Tying the Wet Fly & Fishing the Flymph by James E. Leisenring.  My copy is dated from 1971, and even at that time, you could still find mole skin patches to make your dubbing.  Now you have lots of options both natural, and synthetic, and mole fur dubbing is hard to find.  These patterns could be tied with any dark gray fur or wool or synthetic dubbing.  Which is what J Edson Leonard listed for these patterns in Flies, in 1950. I have other books that list this pattern and the body is tied with some other material.  

 

I know of no book that starts with a cross referenced list of materials and the patterns they could be used for.  I learn my first dubbing techniques from Leisenring's book, and made many of the dubbing loops described.  Interesting tidbit, the very first mention of a dubbing block is one made by Dick Clark in Tying the Wet Fly.

 

Your second question on the vise, has no "real" answer.  Everyone will give you their favorite, or in some cases the one they wish they could afford.  You haven't given us enough information to really help you out there,  As for me, I tie on a Nor-vise, and for patterns smaller than a 16, switch to the midge jaws. I like my vise and see no need to switch.   Other people have equally valid reasons for recommending the vises they do, and the are all correct.  

 

You would be better off in doing stream research, and sampling than in endless reading.  Make your own mind up on patterns to tie that match what you find.  Get to a fly shop, and try out various good quality (American Made,) vises, and pick the one you like and that fits your price range.


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#15 BobHRAH

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 05:12 PM

Anything by Poul Jorgensen.  Second the Oliver Edwards Masterclass; more detailed explanations and amazing illustrations than just about anything else.  Everything in there is a serious challenge.

 

Thanks, Bob H