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Eating Pink salmon


6 replies to this topic

#1 Piker20

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:37 AM

Hi folks, this year saw a lot of pink salmon appear in Scottish and Irish rivers. If next year proves similar I am keen to hear views on the eating quality and when to avoid eating one.
I've been told that because they spawn so soon after entering fresh water there is a small window of opportunity for eating one. Is this just a myth?
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#2 Meeshka

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 11:42 AM

I can't comment on that Piker as I've never fished them in rivers.  We do however catch them when they are staging in salt just prior to going in the rivers.  Good baked in an oven or smoked.



#3 cphubert

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 01:02 PM

I also have never eaten them from a river only the salt, planked, baked in corn huskes on the grill, or smoked.



#4 RickZieger

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 03:17 PM

Grew up in Alaska.  They should be OK as long as they are not turning  color.

 

Rick



#5 Piker20

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:55 AM

Cheers guys. So in tidal stretch or while still "fresh" they should be fine.


Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#6 whatfly

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 12:38 PM

Not the best tasting salmon (mostly found in cans in the US) but adequate when fresh from salt as others have mentioned.  Did not know there were humpies in the Atlantic.  Escapees from aquaculture farms?  Is the population self-sustaining?  Will be curious if you see the same two year cycle that is typical in the Pacific.



#7 Piker20

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 02:59 PM

Not the best tasting salmon (mostly found in cans in the US) but adequate when fresh from salt as others have mentioned.  Did not know there were humpies in the Atlantic.  Escapees from aquaculture farms?  Is the population self-sustaining?  Will be curious if you see the same two year cycle that is typical in the Pacific.

Not 'meant' to be here. Some think they have spread from stockings in Russia and the Baltic as they are not so precious as to where they run unlike the atlantics.
To be honest its mixed response here in UK. Some see it as nature dealing with things and its to be a bonus species to target, others are concerned about spawning bed competition, parr predation, and the general unknown of an alien species appearing in the waters.
Samples would suggest they are spawning successfully but whether that translates to surviving parr and returning runs????
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.



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