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Spray for neoprene waders to make them easier to put on?


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66 replies to this topic

#16 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 11:49 AM

I would "ditto" everything Steeldrifter said--I'm a Michigan guy, too :) -- my cold water set-up is exactly what he described, and it works very well for me. A few additional considerations: 1) thin "liner" socks made of silk or a moisture-wicking synthetic under your thick socks will help to keep your feet a little warmer by wicking the moisture away from the skin. It's not a magic bullet, but it makes a noticeable difference to me. 2) Make sure the wading boots that you use with your new waders are roomy enough to accommodate your feet in thick socks and the neoprene booties attached to the waders without being too tight. In my experience, tight  = cold. 3) I haven't used them myself, but the little chemical warming packs you can get to slip inside your socks supposedly do a really good job. My son used to use them in his riding boots when he rode horses in the dead of winter and he said they worked well. I'm going to try some this year myself.

Once upon a time, you could get boot-foot breathable waders, which would theoretically keep your feet a little warmer than stocking-foots, but I don't know if they even make them anymore.

 

I will also add my voice to the chorus of those telling you how much you're going to love the breathable waders--neoprene simply can't compare.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#17 Patriot

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:02 PM

Ok, gentlemen!  In the name of science - and wading gear, I tried this out.

 

I have used this product for over 15 years.

 

Attached File  wader-lube.jpg   401.85KB   0 downloads

 

It is intended  to be sprayed onto metal surfaces such table saw tops and jointer tables.  It reduces friction and works as advertised.  It does not contain any silicon and that is what prompted me to try it out.

 

So, okay, I sprayed only one leg of my neoprene waders thinking that if I ruined one leg I would still have one good leg and I could just hop around the stream as I fished.  rolleyes.gif

 

After the leg dried - this only takes seconds, I tried them on.  Are you ready for this?  My leg slipped right in.  It was magical.  I felt like Cinderella slipping on the glass slipper.biggrin.png

 

Attached File  neoprene-slipper.png   150.16KB   0 downloads

 

Is this a solution to getting these neoprene beasties on and off?  I have no idea, but like everything else in life - time will tell.  I do knot know how long each spraying will last, but if you have to spray the waders each time you go out that is not really an issue, IMO.

 

I plan on taking both sets of waders when I leave for the San Juan.  Knowing me, I will probably opt for the neoprenes on the first day just to be stubborn, but will switch to the Simms G-T waders the next time out.

 

Now you can forget flytire's PAM and Rocco's KY.  smile.png



#18 Patriot

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:14 PM

I would "ditto" everything Steeldrifter said--I'm a Michigan guy, too smile.png -- my cold water set-up is exactly what he described, and it works very well for me. A few additional considerations: 1) thin "liner" socks made of silk or a moisture-wicking synthetic under your thick socks will help to keep your feet a little warmer by wicking the moisture away from the skin. It's not a magic bullet, but it makes a noticeable difference to me. 2) Make sure the wading boots that you use with your new waders are roomy enough to accommodate your feet in thick socks and the neoprene booties attached to the waders without being too tight. In my experience, tight  = cold. 3) I haven't used them myself, but the little chemical warming packs you can get to slip inside your socks supposedly do a really good job. My son used to use them in his riding boots when he rode horses in the dead of winter and he said they worked well. I'm going to try some this year myself.

Once upon a time, you could get boot-foot breathable waders, which would theoretically keep your feet a little warmer than stocking-foots, but I don't know if they even make them anymore.

 

I will also add my voice to the chorus of those telling you how much you're going to love the breathable waders--neoprene simply can't compare.

 

Thank you for the info.  

 

While reading your post, those chemical foot warmers came to mind.  I may have used those in my heavy boots when I bow hunted in the winter, but I'm not positive about that.  These may be worth a shot when fishing in very cold water.

 

My foot size is 12 and the waders I purchased have a size 12-13 foot.  As I noted earlier, I had no choice but to purchase these oversized waders because my inseam size only came with 9-11 sized foot.  That said, the larger stockingfoot should accomodate thick socks and slip right into the size 13 Simms G3 Guide boots I I just purchased.

 

I appreciate your comments.



#19 flytire

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:13 PM

maybe its time to rethink how to wear those waders :)

 

IMG_1148a.JPG


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#20 steeldrifter

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:18 PM

I've done the hand warmer heat packs like that inside the wader feet before. It does work okay for a few hours, but if you're anything like me (I'm somewhat ocd) feeling the little pack itself on top my foot drove me nuts and I couldn't stand it.


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#21 Patriot

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:28 PM

I've done the hand warmer heat packs like that inside the wader feet before. It does work okay for a few hours, but if you're anything like me (I'm somewhat ocd) feeling the little pack itself on top my foot drove me nuts and I couldn't stand it.

I hear you.  I've never tried them for waders, it was just a thought.  However, if it gets cold enough, they may be the way to go. Of course, if I needed them, I probably would not have them.  



#22 mikechell

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 04:07 PM

I am unsure, now, of what's meant by "neoprene waders".

Mine are neoprene, but they don't fit like a wet suit.  There's enough room for sweats and regular pants ... at least two layers of clothes under them.  I guess that's why I don't have any problem putting them on.

 

Careful using that spray, Patriot.  Most people can handle getting gasoline on their skin and letting it evaporate off.  But if gasoline is trapped on the skin, say soaked clothes left on for more than a few minutes, and most of those same people will develop chemical burn blisters.

 

That lubricant spray might react the same way.  You'll be fine until the first time you work up a sweat, then you'll regret it.  Be sure to check out MSD Sheets for any chemical you plan to use.

They can be found, free, at https://www.msdsonline.com


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#23 steeldrifter

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 04:47 PM

Are yours boot foot or stocking foot neo's Mike? If they are boot foot then that's why they fit a bit roomier. Stocking foot neo's are quite a bit more form fitting than boot foot models.


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#24 Poopdeck

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 04:52 PM

Forget the hot hands or toastie toes warming packs in you boots. They need O2 to work. As soon as you stick you boot in the water they will diminish in heat and you will only feel the residue heat until it dissipates. They don't work very well in boots out of water. I tried them ice fishing and found them to be next to worthless yet highly annoying and uncomfortable.

#25 mikechell

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 04:52 PM

Boot footed.  I'm too cheap to have a pair of waders AND a pair of wading boots.

 

I have waders for when it's too cold to wade in sandals.


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#26 Patriot

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 08:55 PM

I am unsure, now, of what's meant by "neoprene waders".

Mine are neoprene, but they don't fit like a wet suit.  There's enough room for sweats and regular pants ... at least two layers of clothes under them.  I guess that's why I don't have any problem putting them on.

 

Careful using that spray, Patriot.  Most people can handle getting gasoline on their skin and letting it evaporate off.  But if gasoline is trapped on the skin, say soaked clothes left on for more than a few minutes, and most of those same people will develop chemical burn blisters.

 

That lubricant spray might react the same way.  You'll be fine until the first time you work up a sweat, then you'll regret it.  Be sure to check out MSD Sheets for any chemical you plan to use.

They can be found, free, at https://www.msdsonline.com

 

I hear you.  I'll take another look at the can and check for MSDS info.  

 

Thanks for the heads up.



#27 vicente

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 07:04 PM

Merino wool is the best base layer imo, comfortable, warm, breathes well, and if you fall in it still insulates when wet.

#28 Patriot

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 08:27 PM

Merino wool is the best base layer imo, comfortable, warm, breathes well, and if you fall in it still insulates when wet.

Good point.  You must be referring to something like this.  I was going to give you a hard time about the itching I remember about wool shirts, but they claim that the new wool is 'itch free'.  IMO, that's a stretch, but it may well be true.  

 

Thanks for your post.



#29 spiralspey

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 12:29 AM

I agree about the merino wool, it's warm, is still warm when it's wet, and really doesn't itch. I wear merino wool socks, hat, and gloves for my winter fishing. I bet wool long johns would be great too, I just haven't had the need.
I can hike for miles in my breathable waders (and I often do) with wool and synthetics underneath, and I stay dry and warm in cold weather. If you did that in neoprene you'd be drenched in sweat and would be cold in no time.

#30 flytire

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 06:46 AM

yup. merino wool does NOT ITCH and are warm on your feet

 

i like the smartwool brand

 

http://www.smartwool...22&beginIndex=0


Friday is my second favorite "f" word. Floccinaucinihilipilification is my first.