Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Spray for neoprene waders to make them easier to put on?


  • Please log in to reply
66 replies to this topic

#61 JSzymczyk

JSzymczyk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,305 posts

Posted 05 November 2017 - 06:14 PM

I kneel quite a lot while stream fishing...

 

I am also repeatedly amazed when people talk about hiking in their waders then complain about sweaty feet.    Lightweight hikers and a backpack anyone?  


the gales of November remembered...


#62 Patriot

Patriot

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts

Posted 05 November 2017 - 06:17 PM

I kneel quite a lot while stream fishing...

 

I am also repeatedly amazed when people talk about hiking in their waders then complain about sweaty feet.    Lightweight hikers and a backpack anyone?  

LOL!  I hear you on the hiking in waders part.  I've learned my lesson.



#63 spiralspey

spiralspey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 05 November 2017 - 07:12 PM

Those Simms waders have 5 layers of fabric on the lower sections, I've always felt that was plenty of protection for beating through the bushes (except thorns) and plenty of knee protection for kneeling. I guess if you want padding, you could wear some thin knee pads under your waders if you kneel a lot and have bad knees.
I often hike for miles in my GT waders, climb in and out of canyons, and I've even backpacked in them a few times. Yes your feet get a little damp from sweat, but with the right socks this can be kept to a minimum and your feet will still be warm even if they're damp. No matter how you look at it they're way more comfortable, warmer in winter, and cooler in summer, then neoprene.

#64 Patriot

Patriot

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:26 PM

Those Simms waders have 5 layers of fabric on the lower sections, I've always felt that was plenty of protection for beating through the bushes (except thorns) and plenty of knee protection for kneeling. I guess if you want padding, you could wear some thin knee pads under your waders if you kneel a lot and have bad knees.
I often hike for miles in my GT waders, climb in and out of canyons, and I've even backpacked in them a few times. Yes your feet get a little damp from sweat, but with the right socks this can be kept to a minimum and your feet will still be warm even if they're damp. No matter how you look at it they're way more comfortable, warmer in winter, and cooler in summer, then neoprene.

 

You are absolutely correct about the GT waders being so-o much more comfortable than neoprene.  I am a true beleiver now.

 

I think I recall you mentioning that you had fished the SJR and were headed there in December.  If this is correct, you may be familiar with the wide flat just below the Texas Hole.  To get to this area you have go nearly crawl through the willows to reach the river.  Passing through there I was a bit worried about snagging the waders as I trekked my way through that maze.  Fortunately, my waders are none the worse for wear which is testament to their abrasion-resistance.



#65 spiralspey

spiralspey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 05 November 2017 - 11:09 PM

I actually haven't fished the SJ.....yet. I do hope to make it there either later this month or in early December for the first time. I am familiar with where the Texas hole is (on the map), have seen videos of folks threading their way through those thick willows, and we'll see if I'm willing to go that route. I've pushed my way through a lot of willows over the years, I've never snagged my waders on willows, but I always worry about getting speared by beaver cut willow stems. Those things will definitely tear your waders if you kneel or fall on them.
I hope you found some nice fish.

#66 Patriot

Patriot

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts

Posted 06 November 2017 - 12:03 AM

I actually haven't fished the SJ.....yet. I do hope to make it there either later this month or in early December for the first time. I am familiar with where the Texas hole is (on the map), have seen videos of folks threading their way through those thick willows, and we'll see if I'm willing to go that route. I've pushed my way through a lot of willows over the years, I've never snagged my waders on willows, but I always worry about getting speared by beaver cut willow stems. Those things will definitely tear your waders if you kneel or fall on them.
I hope you found some nice fish.

 

At the moment, I am documenting my weeklong stay on the river on my website.  I will link you up to it via PM when done.  I will also post a link to it on a new thread.  I also did a minor review of all of the new gear I was using. In addition, I want to pass on to you some of the fly patterns that worked.

 

In brief, the fishing was subpar for everyone that I saw on the stream.  A book that I refer to as my 'San Juan River bible', notes that any change in weather 'may' have an affect on the fish.  A full moon will supposedly do the same.  Both of these phenomenon occurred during my stay.  Whether this is true or not, I have no idea.  But, I do know for certain, that the fishing was difficult.  This is not to say that no one was catching any fish because we all caught fish, but hooking up was not easy.

 

The water is low and crystal clear and choice of tippet probably has a huge affect on the hook-up percentage.  

 

On two separate days, many 20-inchers or larger would congregate downstream directly behind me.  They hang around there waiting for you to stir up the water bed as you scuffle about. Any chow you dislodge floats right to them.  I watched this behavior for a while but could never figure out exactly what they were munching on.  Whatever it was, it was very small.  Midges were everywhere - on your waders, your vest, eyes, just everywhere.  Midge hatches are, without fail, a daily occurrence.  At one time I laughed to myself thinking, 'Little wonder I'm not catching any fish because they are all behind me'.  My wife found some amusement in that.  I was not sure what to think.

 

The NMG&F had just stocked thousands of fingerlings and they were taking dries all day long.  I have always been a 90/10 fly fisherman: 90% nymphing and 10% fishing the surface.  Seeing these small fry jumping about nearly all day long became a bit much, but fish do what fish do.

 

My focus was nearly always below the surface.  Dries are difficult to see with all the organic flotsam drifting by on the surface.  This is not to say that dries cannot be seen, but you have to really watch where you cast.  If the wind is blowing, casting becomes difficult, and seeing your fly on the wavy surface nearly impossible.

 

I mean none of these things in a negative sense, because this is after all, the way fishing goes.

 

Anyway, I will PM you later this week.

 

Best!



#67 spiralspey

spiralspey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 06 November 2017 - 08:24 AM

Thanks, I'd appreciate that.

Ah, the "San Juan shuffle." A friend of mine jokes about it when we fish a tailwater that is similar to the SJ, but I've never actually seen fish doing it. I think I'll be bringing an insect sampling net, my tying gear, and will be doing some tying while I'm there.