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43 replies to this topic

#16 vicrider

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 05:18 AM

That's a nice setup but for the very occasional use I put mine too the Craftsman does the job for me. I looked over the Grizzly.com site and all I can say is that they are definitely not in competition with Harbor Freight in price or quality, and I'm a guy who shops Harbor Freight. You're going to have some quality equipment for your use down there in the man cave.



#17 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:34 PM

Thanks guys for the replies and advice. Poopdeck, you'll be glad to know that Johnson's Paste Wax is recommended by name in the owner's manual for the saw, and I have a big container of it in the shop already, as I used it on my previous saw. :)  

 

Vicente, I have a little bit of an unusual electrical situation down in my basement -- the unfnished part, where my tools are kept, has no wall outlets at all. The only outlet available to me down there is on the ceiling; it is built into a light socket. Currently, from that one lonely outlet, I have a labyrinth of extension cords running to my shop lights, and --prior to the reconfiguring of the shop to accommodate the new saw--to strategically placed power strips, into which I could plug one power tool at a time. Not the best solution, I'll grant you, but the only one available up to now. The electrician I mentioned in my earlier post is going to run two new circuits for me; one will have a single outlet and will serve my dust collector and my small miter saw. The second will have 3 wall outlets near the various other tools (router table, drill press, and table saw) and ceiling outlets for the shop lights. I'd love to know how to do all that, but my knowledge of the electrical world at present extends just beyond how to screw in a light bulb. :)

 

I'm looking at 2-3 weeks yet before they can come out and do the wiring. It's a long time to wait to use a new toy, but I think it's going to be a pretty nice setup when it's all done.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#18 mikechell

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:50 PM

I am glad to know you're using an electrician.  If he'll do it, make sure he doesn't set up GFCI outlets.  They're okay for a bathroom, etc ... but not so much for a workshop.  To easy to pop one sawing through a knot or wet wood.  A good circuit breaker panel is a must for a full function wood working shop.

 

Love the saw ... looking forward to pictures of the shop set up and, of course, the products of your "investment."


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#19 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 02:21 PM

Mike,

 

Is a GFCI outlet the same thing as a GFI (Ground Fault Interrupter, I think...?) If so, the electrician told me he had to do GFI outlets because it was "code" in our area, so I might just have to live with them.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#20 mikechell

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 02:46 PM

Yes, but it is a GFCI ... Ground fault circuit interrupter. 

 

Probably is code ... and has become so in many areas.  But some States allow non-interrupt outlets in dry areas.

Fuses and circuit breakers are designed to keep wires from melting if current flow gets too high (short circuit, stuck motor, etc.)

you can be electrocuted with amperages less than required to "pop" a circuit breaker.

 

GFCI outlets are designed to keep you from getting electrocuted.  Any imbalance between the two "power" slots on the outlet will trip the interrupt.  In a well laid out and wired shop, you'll never run into the possibility.  It's, basically, there to protect the idiot trying to dry his hair while still in the shower.  

 

Unfortunately, if codes call for all outlets in the house to be GFCI ... then your stuck.  Just don't buy the cheapest outlets.

Or change them after the job is done.


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#21 steeldrifter

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 02:47 PM

Little "accidental" epoxy over the GFI button keeps it from popping.....not that you heard that from me lol laugh.png


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#22 mikechell

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 02:50 PM

Man ... I hate those superglue spills !!!  laugh.png


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#23 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 03:42 PM

I learn so much on this site. Thanks Mike and Steve for your input.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#24 Peartree

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 09:25 PM

If that saw is setup the same as my older model is, you can set it up for 220v or 120v. I'd you have the breaker space available, you may want to have your electrician run a dedicated circuit in 220 for it. It runs better and has more power for cutting through heavier material.

#25 rstaight

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 10:06 PM

I have a Grizzly 14" band saw that I got about 18 years ago. Upgraded the guide blocks with roller bearings and couldn't be happier.

 

GFCI's don't like motor loads but a quality GFCI can handle it. In my shop the table saw, radial arm, band saw, and dust collector are all on there own breaker.

 

My present shop is in the basement and the electricians that added the second breaker box and wired the shop said I didn't need GFCI. They are not near a water source and about 4 feet off the floor.

 

Most contractor and cabinet saws can be wired 110 or 220. Should be in the manual or plainly marked on the motor.


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#26 Swamp Fly

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 06:41 AM

If that saw is setup the same as my older model is, you can set it up for 220v or 120v. I'd you have the breaker space available, you may want to have your electrician run a dedicated circuit in 220 for it. It runs better and has more power for cutting through heavier material.

Byron, along those lines talk to your electrician about running a 220 line to your shop and then putting in a sub panel if your main panel isn't already there.  This leaves room for expansion, you only have to run on line from your main panel, lets you run 220v to bigger equipment (usually better for it), and keeps you from going elsewhere to flip a breaker that you will blow sooner or later.  If your main service is already there it's obviously a mute point. You may also talk to the electrician GFCI breakers rather than outlets.  Get yourself a basic book on home electric if only so you can have an intelligent conversation, if you get an unscrupulous contractor they won't be able to sell you "super special reverse polarity AC wiring" or some such.  Electrical is not difficult but it can hurt you, kill you, or burn down your house. Having some basic knowledge can save your butt even if you don't do more than trouble shoot or some basic maintenance. Just knowing how to run a multimeter (which should be covered in a good book) can save you a lot of time and money.

 

Nice saw BTW, hope it serves you well.



#27 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 01:40 PM

Thanks, guys, for all the tips on the electrical stuff. A couple of people mentioned wiring the saw for 240 instead of 120 -- it is set up to do either, but I'm keeping it 120 for now. The vast majority of stock that I cut is pre-surfaced 3/4" stock, much of it plywood. I don't really see myself sawing through very thick, knotty, wet or treated wood for the time being. That being said, my main breaker box does have at least one 240 slot in it (we expanded it a while back when we thought we were getting a hot tub), so I may end up going to 240 down the line somewhere. My old Craftsman saw ran off the 120 and it never even threw the breaker on the power strip it was plugged into, so I'm hoping the Grizzly will do okay on it, as well.

Swamp Fly, you make an excellent point about needing to educate myself on the basics of home electrical work; as you said, if nothing else, it will allow me to converse intelligently with an electrician and not get fleeced on something. I will get myself a good book (open to recommendations if anyone has any.)

 

The guys I hired are local and long-established in my town, family business handed down father-to-son, lots of positive reviews locally, so I do feel confident that they are dealing honestly with me.

 

Wiring will be done next Friday (12/15), so hopefully I'll have the saw dialed in and making stuff by Christmas. Looking forward to it!


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#28 Poopdeck

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 07:16 PM

You still got time to change your wiring plan. My saw is set up for 120 and I'm about to have my electrician come out and repower my entire shop. It will include 220 lines and 110. I recently did my first slab bartop and I'm looking to do more slab work. I cut the slab on a lesser saw that was hooked up 220. It cut like butter. I did some work on the slab cutoffs on my saw and it laborer through so I'm upgrading. If you already have a spot in your panel for 220 than the expensive part is already done. Running an additional length of cable will not be cost prohibited.Now if your electrician is simply running lines off of an existing 110 circuit your not really adding power to your shop your simply making permanent extension cords. Power to a shop is as important to a shop as any tool in the shop.

By the way, here is my new bartop. By the way my designer wanted $5800.00 for one already made. I put $585.00 out for the slab and another 140 for brackets. That paid for all the saws in my shop by itself.

File Dec 07, 7 03 18 PM.jpeg

#29 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 09:56 PM

You still got time to change your wiring plan. My saw is set up for 120 and I'm about to have my electrician come out and repower my entire shop. It will include 220 lines and 110. I recently did my first slab bartop and I'm looking to do more slab work. I cut the slab on a lesser saw that was hooked up 220. It cut like butter. I did some work on the slab cutoffs on my saw and it laborer through so I'm upgrading. If you already have a spot in your panel for 220 than the expensive part is already done. Running an additional length of cable will not be cost prohibited.Now if your electrician is simply running lines off of an existing 110 circuit your not really adding power to your shop your simply making permanent extension cords. Power to a shop is as important to a shop as any tool in the shop.

By the way, here is my new bartop. By the way my designer wanted $5800.00 for one already made. I put $585.00 out for the slab and another 140 for brackets. That paid for all the saws in my shop by itself.

attachicon.gifFile Dec 07, 7 03 18 PM.jpeg

That bartop looks awesome! Nice work.

 

I did ask the electrician about the idea of running a 220 circuit just for the saw, but he seemed to think it wouldn't make that much of a difference. He explained why he thought that, but I didn't really understand it. (I really need to learn more about electricity.) Maybe I'll give him a call and discuss it further before he comes to do the job.

 

As for the 110 circuits, they are both going to be new circuits just for the shop.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#30 Poopdeck

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 11:18 PM

I'm sure there are smart electrical people on this site that can answer if 220 or 110 is better or the same. Regardless of voltage your motor will produce the same horsepower. But, I understand, it's how the Amps effect the efficiency of that motor. So 220 provides more consistent power through loads because the motor recovers faster when a load wants to bog it down. Will it make a difference in 3/4 stock, nope not one bit. For thick stock it sure seems like it does to me. To be fair the difference I described could also be attributed to the blade but I keep sharp blades so I really believe, without actually knowing the science, 220 made cutting the slab easier.



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