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2 pc. Vs. 4 pc.


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Bimini15

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 03:25 PM

So, can we call 2 piece rods a thing of the past now, or do we still have to wait?

How many new rods come in 2 piece models?
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#2 Meeshka

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 04:00 PM

all my rods I ever bought or made pre 2000 were 2 piece.  Now all except the bamboo are 4 piece.  I just find them more convienient in terms especially of packability.  I can't see a difference in fishability



#3 steeldrifter

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 04:58 PM

 

So, can we call 2 piece rods a thing of the past now, or do we still have to wait?

 

I guess I'd say why does it matter? ;)  Some people like 2pc and some like 4pc, backpackers like 7pc, bass/baitcaster anglers seem to like 1pc now...etc etc

 

There's still tons of 2pc rod blanks out there. Factory rods are more leaning towards 4pc the past 5 years. With today's ferrule technology there's no difference anymore between 2pc to 7pc far as feel. Personally I prefer 2pc over 4pc just because it's less joints to have to mess with and make sure stay tight / don't get stuck. Only real determining factor these days on number of pieces is based on transport ability of the car\truck you drive to the river.


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#4 Dave G.

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 06:25 PM

Switch rods and spey rod blanks to me make sense to have 3 or 4 pieces . But the average 9 ft rod or shorter I'm fine with two piece. I'm one who rarely breaks a rod down more than in two anyway. Buying 2 piece blanks to build on are less expensive to buy too. I do own a Sage and an Echo 6wt that are four piece rods and if I build a switch/spey rod in the next year that will be 4 piece.. It probably is different if you fly a lot but I hardly ever fly.


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#5 redietz

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 08:26 PM

But the average 9 ft rod or shorter I'm fine with two piece. I'm one who rarely breaks a rod down more than in two anyway. Buying 2 piece blanks to build on are less expensive to buy too.... It probably is different if you fly a lot but I hardly ever fly.

I'm with you on that.  The 4 piece rods are nice if you travel by air, and I own several just for that reason, but in general I'd rather not waste the time to assemble a four piece rod when I'm anxious to fish.


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#6 mikechell

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 09:04 PM

Most of my rods from White River (BPS) are 2 piece rods.  Honestly, I can't tell any difference in how they feel or work.  I don't buy rods based on how many pieces they break down to. 

The only rod I've ever done that with was the one I take on my trips.


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#7 Rocco

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 09:54 PM

It would be interesting to see the same 9' blanks in a 2 and 4 piece configuration load tested for arc, strength, and tip return/tip bounce on release from work.  I do not have a clue myself about the outcome and the differences may well be insiginificant but at least there would be better than a subjective "feel" comparison base.

 

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#8 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 05:45 AM

I have to agree with Steeldrifter on this topic and yes, the two piece blanks were always a bit cheaper if you were building your own...  With how we use our rods down here in paradise breakage is always a concern (and all it takes is one ferrule to work loose during the day then a sudden big fish will equal a broken rod - every joint has to be tight always....).  That might be one of the reasons that I tend to assemble every fly rod (I keep more than a half dozen rigged and another half dozen rods without reels on them...) and then simply never take it apart - since all my travelling will be with my rods in their horizontal racks on my skiff....

 

There's no doubt, if you travel by air then four or five piece rods are the only way to go...


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#9 ben bell

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 09:40 AM

i made this telescopic fly/spin rod from a cabelas panfish rod many years ago. it,s still in one piece, so to speak.lol. it fits easily into the pouch of my kick boat being only 17" long when collapsed and is 7' when extended..i use 4wt. line, just right for bluegills. the spin rod is 6' long

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#10 spiralspey

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 10:08 AM

Having owned 2, 3, 4, and 5 piece rods over the years I can definitely say that I prefer a 4 piece rod over any other configuration. I break down my rods after every trip and find no difficulties in assembling or disassembling them, and they sure are easer to transport. I'm very surprised when I occasionally see a 2 piece rod in a fly shop, but it's becoming a much rarer occurrence.

I love my 4 piecers, but if I was a saltwater guy who kept his gear in the boat I'd consider one of the newer one piece rods, though.

#11 tjm

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 12:44 PM

I have had enough rods come un-jointed that I want as few pieces as I can fit in my car, up to 9' two pieces work fine. If I only drove the F250 fishing 9' could be one piece,

I think this happens more with  lots of roll casting than with overhead casts. A slightly loose joint has turned into a broken rod more than once. I check that ferrule every once in a while.

Even if the joints are technically such now that they can't twist or work loose, they still have to be tweaked and aligned each time you build the rod which might be several times in a day if you move from one hole to another. If I'm ever forced to buy a 4-5-6 piece rod because of availability, the first thing I'll do is super glue some of those joints.

Hopefully there will always be custom rod builders and uncut blanks.



#12 Piker20

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 03:46 PM

I have a one piece lure rod and it feels like it transfers every little movement down to the handle. With ferules in there I'm sure some feeling is lost but it could easily be in my head. 


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#13 jhr163

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 08:22 PM

Both! For travel, 4-pc or more. For local, 2 or 3 because they are less expensive. For someone who spends even a minimal amount of time practicing, cast ability is not an issue.

#14 vicrider

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 12:15 AM

... If I'm ever forced to buy a 4-5-6 piece rod because of availability, the first thing I'll do is super glue some of those joints.

 

Now that's funny, I don't care who you are. For me, it's 2 piece rods. I'm using almost all bamboo now and since most are metal ferrules I want as few of them as possible. As for graphite or glass, the modern materials combined with all the computer power and programs directed toward their development they can control material and tapers to eliminate "hard" spots and give some extremely good performing rod in multiple pieces, like Steve said above. I went with the 1 piece bass fishing craze years ago and most of my bass rods are one piece but I have an old two piece Lightning Rod in short 5.5' length that's gone in many places I had to carry a rod and probably has caught as many fish as any of my one piece rods have.



#15 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 05:31 AM

Forgot to mention a few items in my last post... First off - one of the things about guiding is that I'm not the one using my rods most days... and I do get a lot of first timers making the transition from fresh to salt with the fly... If a rod is in my hand I'll know with just a casting stroke or two if something's loose - not so with many of my fly anglers who are struggling just to get the fly on target.  

 

Secondly I build every one of the spin or conventional rods that we use - and I won't have anything other than a one piece blank for those... Nothing beats a one piece blank when you have to go to the max on a really big fish - just something you learn over time.  Since one piece rods don't travel well I did build (and still have) two spinning rods that are two piece blanks.  The only time they see any use is for travelling or when I'm short a rod and need a fill-in until I can either build another rod (or repair one that needs a new guide or two...).  When I'm speaking of really big fish we're in or near the 10 to 1 size.... That's a 100lb tarpon on 10lb line or a 200lb shark on 20....  No matter how well I build a rod it also must get used properly on a big fish (no "high sticking", and you must never allow a rod to touch the gunnel under a severe load....).  Mis-handle any rod with a big fish and it will break on you -sometimes in spectacular fashion....  I never charge a penny when someone breaks one of my rods since it's my job to see that the rods are handled properly.  I do have a 10 and a 12wt that have beaten many big fish - and are still going strong 20 years later.  I also have factory rods (by Sage and others) that have been returned for breakage more than once - in a single year,....  Breakage on fly rods is the main reason I quit building fly rods for my business - much, much better to have a warranty repair (particulaly when an outfit like TFO is so good about turnaround time -don't ask about Sage....).


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