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DIY Dubbing Brush?


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Elder

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 02:35 PM

Have read some people use dubbing wax on the wire,

other head cement to help hold the material while spinning.

Any other ideas?  Thanks



#2 Bimini15

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 02:51 PM

Do those not work?
Bimini15

#3 mikechell

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:11 PM

For a day or two, I was interested in dubbing brushes.  (The feeling quickly passed)

During that time, I was looking at YouTube videos for making them.

 

NONE of the videos show people putting anything on the wire.

 

I DO use dubbing loops a lot on my flies.  Putting the material in the thread loop, I don't use anything on there, either.  Never seem to have any problems with materials falling out.


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#4 deaddrifter

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:15 PM

I do know a couple people that use dubbing wax but I've not really found it necessary.  I would not suggest head cement.  I would think that would result in a matted brush.  I've found the trick really is making sure you have a stable enough setup so the wire holds the materials well when you start spinning the wire.



#5 TheCream

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:47 PM

I use brushes quite a bit.  Depending on the material(s) in the brush, I may or may not use wax.  If I am making a more complex brush with multiple materials, I am more likely to wax the wire.  

 

Mike, here's when dubbing brushes make sense (to me): doing lots of flies that require dubbing loops in a single sitting.  My most productive streamer this year I tie with a body of Ice Dub, either in a brush or dubbing loop.  Do I notice a difference in the durability, fishability, or appearance of loop vs brush?  No.  The difference is in speed.  I can do a dubbing brush on my table large enough to tie several of this pattern in just a few minutes.  It's really fast.  Then, when I go to tie a half dozen of them, I tie in the brush, wrap and go.  No creating dubbing loops, no prepping the material.  I'm absolutely not a speed tyer, but I saw the difference in tying a half dozen of these in maybe half an hour vs 45 minutes, that caught my attention.  The brush is very basic, very fast, very efficient. 

 

pdqRyBSl.jpg



#6 mikechell

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 06:13 PM

Cream,

I understand the purpose and ease of dubbing brushes.  But the reasons I dropped the idea was this:

The largest fly I tie is on a size 4 hook.  And I don't tie many of those. 

For size 8 through 12, I figured the wire in a brush would add noticable weight.

 

Am I mistaken in these?


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#7 Elder

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 06:14 PM

Thanks to all

Mike SOME do.

 



#8 mikechell

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 06:15 PM

 

Mike SOME do.

 

Oops.  I should rephrase to say, none did in the videos I watched.  tongue.png


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#9 xpman

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 06:23 PM

I have used the turbo dubbing block for years, but now I don't commercial tie I rarely use it. Wire was slippery so I used head cement. Now a days I am back to dubbing loops and do not need anything other that the thread I use.

ron



#10 whatfly

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:06 PM

Yeah, I'm with Bimini, have you tried either of those techniques yet?  It might be helpful  to know why you ask.

 

Personally, I use wax for particularly slippery materials in dubbing loops when tying at the vise, but not when using a dubbing block because I have better control on a flat surface.  Quite useful at the vise for some materials.



#11 Poopdeck

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:15 PM

I like brushes. So much easier to tie large streamers with a brush. I don't put anything on the wire.

#12 TheCream

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 07:48 AM

Cream,

I understand the purpose and ease of dubbing brushes.  But the reasons I dropped the idea was this:

The largest fly I tie is on a size 4 hook.  And I don't tie many of those. 

For size 8 through 12, I figured the wire in a brush would add noticable weight.

 

Am I mistaken in these?

 

It depends on the wire.  If you used a really heavy wire I could see that adding a touch of weight, but I use this stuff in the Medium size and it's extremely light: http://store.flyfish...-Wire-p/dbw.htm

 

Brushes definitely don't "fit" with every fly pattern but, when they do, they make life a lot easier.  I built my brush table for essentially under $15.  Scrap wood was used that we already had in my dad's workshop at the time was primarily used, I just had to buy a set of roller blade bearings to provide the smooth spinning "hub" on the spinning end.  I don't use brushes for all of my streamers, but when I do...crap that sounds like a Dos Equis commercial.  Stay tying, my friends. 



#13 RickZieger

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 10:15 AM

I don't use anything on the wire when I make brushes.  I do find that if I turn the knob slowly for several turns the materials do not move.

Have not tried many slippery materials to make brushes.

 

Rick