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Any of you kayak guys have thoughts about the Anchor Wizard?


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28 replies to this topic

#16 mikechell

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 08:47 PM

Just to let you know, jet drive systems require more horsepower to achieve the same output.  

A "20 Hp jet drive" is actually a 35 or 40 horse power engine.

Honda's 60 Hp jet drive is a 90 Hp V-Tech engine.

 

I only bring this up to outline the need for a boat that can support the weight of a jet drive, it needs to be able to support a larger engine than a prop drive.

 

Anchoring in current is not dangerous, if you're anchoring in "anchorable" current.  That's not as redundant a statement as it seems. 

I truly think owning a boat should require a "driver's license" type study and test.  Even kayak, canoes and float tubes require SOME seamanship.

 

If you're anchoring in current that can swamp your boat as soon as the anchor grabs, then you probably should go under and earn a Darwin Award.  Sorry, that might be a bit ... harsh.


Barbed hooks rule!

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#17 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 12:50 AM

Good point about the jet drive vs. prop drive motors Mike -- that makes sense.

 

I totally agree with you about the need for some basic knowledge of seamanship for anyone operating any kind of boat anywhere. I would say that goes double for people like me, who are not strong swimmers even in calm water and favorable conditions. That's a big part of the reason why I come on here (and other forums) and ask lots of questions about this kind of thing before I venture out into a situation where I could get in trouble. I would actually love to take a class on kayaking safety if one were available near me. I'll have to look into that.


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#18 Poopdeck

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 01:56 AM

A drift sock slows your drift when the wind is blowing with current. It's more of tool to use in windy conditions to slow your drift to the speed of the current. Drag chains are exceptionally dangerous and really have been gotten away from over the last 20 or so years. I would not use either in a shallow river since both WILL get hung up in short order and potentially flip your boat or stop unexpectantly and fast enough to knock you over.

Outboard Jet motors are nothing more then a standard issue outboard with a jet pump on the bottom instead of a traditional lower unit containing a drive shaft, lots of oil, a prop shaft and a prop. They have a 30% HP drop from the power head to the jet output. They are generally rated at 65/40, 90/65, 115/80, 150/105. On HP restricted waters the HP at the power head is where it counts. They are more expensive to run because unfortunately they don't drink 30% less gas and your always running them at or close to wide open.

They do make small inboard diesel jets that I think are about 8 HP. These are the motors you see in the mokia motorized kayaks, which, by the way, are pretty cool kayaks.

My jet boat is 18.5' (measure at waterline but closer to 21' head to toe) with a 7' beam. I can take it most anywhere a kayak can go. It took me many decades of paying catholic school and college tuitions before I was able to afford one. Your time will come as well and it will come quicker then you can imagine.

#19 tjm

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 05:48 AM

Was wondering about the anchoring in current issue, how is that different in a kayak than in a canoe? I've dropped the window sash weight hundreds of times from my canoe in current and have yet to observe any danger of swamping the boat. Did it when I had a pram and with the jonboat too.

What did I miss?



#20 mikechell

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 09:02 AM

 

What did I miss?

Stability and distance above waterline.  A kayak has neither. 

 

Distance above water line:  When an anchor grabs in current, the rope will pull down on the boat.  With a kayak, that pull can bury the point of the boat and current can continue pulling the boat under.

 

Stability:  Any boat will "wag" in current, when anchored.  A kayak's wag will be much more pronounced and ... unpleasant.  The stronger the current, the more the wag.  With most boats, this is just an inconvenience.  With a kayak, if the boat swings far enough, it is affected from the side and can roll.


Barbed hooks rule!

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#21 Flat Rock native

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 12:45 PM

Mike is correct, we almost swapped our 24 foot pontoon boat while on the cruise one summer. About 10 people rushed to front for a group photo ..... and..... pilot luckily cut throttle immediately before anyone was run over..... near disaster averted.... but good story

and more evidence that driver's ed for watercraft is a good thing!

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#22 tjm

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 06:06 PM

I better not get a kayak. I was thinking about it but by the time I get one large/stable enough to suit me the weight and length are canoe comparable. I wasn't even thinking of free board wash over. ty



#23 JSzymczyk

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 07:42 PM

Purpose built SOT fishing kayaks have both exceptional stability and adequate freeboard.   That said, everything is relative.   If you are dumb enough to try anchoring incorrectly in heavy current, then you get what you deserve.  

 

Drag chains are far from "gotten away from" - again it's all about knowing what you are doing and not being an idiot.   I'm not aware of any data showing drag chains used by kayaks or canoes cause any more effect than tree limbs, logs, ice, and whatever else tumbles along a streambed over the course of a year, or decade, or century.   Worried about the effects on a riverbed... I've seen hundreds of examples of washouts and giant sediment clouds caused by powerboats.   I'm really not an environmental whacko... but trying to argue that a drag chain behind a canoe is somehow more "detrimental" to "the environment" than towing and operating a 20 foot boat is pointless.

 

Jet boats are great, but it sure seems, at least here on the Susquehanna, the bigger the jet boat, the smaller the IQ of the driver.    Arrogant pricks, for the most part.  That's true pretty much anywhere when it comes to boats though... the more some douchebag mortgages for his boat, the more entitled they act.   Anyway...  I know a whole load of places I fish that no jetboat can go, and most other places they can, but at what cost?   Noise, fuel, wakes washing away at the bank, etc.  (because 9 out of 10 operators aren't smart enough to understand how to trim the drive and stay on plane)

 

Fishing a stream or river from a kayak designed for fishing is about as enjoyable as anything can be.   IMO if you want to add a motor to a kayak, just buy a "regular" boat.  

 

ok, rant over. 


the gales of November remembered...


#24 agn54

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 11:28 AM

My absolutely favorite anchor for jon boats and kayaks (when I used one) is a Mule anchor. It's basically a wedged shaped hunk of lead that looks like a door stopper. Doesn't get hung up on roots, burrows into the mud but doesn't pull up any of it like  mushroom anchor, and is easy to pop out of the rocks. Unfortunately, they are hard to find, but of you know someone who smelts, they can probably make one easily. 



#25 mikechell

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 11:35 AM

agn, do you have a picture?  Look up "mule anchor" and it shows a brand name of anchors, none of which match your description. 

 

I also looked up "wedge shaped anchor" and got nothing.

 

I think you're referring to some local type of anchor.  I like the sound of it, but I'd like to see a picture of one, please.


Barbed hooks rule!

My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.

Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis

 


#26 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 02:09 PM

agn, do you have a picture?  Look up "mule anchor" and it shows a brand name of anchors, none of which match your description. 
 
I also looked up "wedge shaped anchor" and got nothing.
 
I think you're referring to some local type of anchor.  I like the sound of it, but I'd like to see a picture of one, please.




I'd like to see a picture of that anchor, too!

"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#27 steeldrifter

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 12:11 AM

Numerous replies have been deleted. Some of you guys are acting like a bunch of immature children. Knock it off or you will be gone I'm tired of all this nonsense lately. Either keep on topic and have adult replies or this will close and I'll start booting people. Too much of this BS lately and I've gone my limit.


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#28 Dave G.

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 08:53 AM

If I can't have a drift boat in a river due to cost matters then my preference is a shallow arch or close to shallow arch flat bottom moderate rocker canoe for river fishing places you can't get to with a v bottom boat or might not want to be in a kayak beyond passing through.. And a 10lb mushroom anchor with a pulley system over the bow or stern. We move right up into the head of pools in our Old Town, pick a spot to drop anchor, then let out line till we have a good 20ft of rope showing up stream . This gives a good angle to not suck the canoe down and for the anchor to grab structure. When we get ready to leave the spot just move up stream till over the anchor and pull it back up. Our rig has a cleat on the end that pinches the rope and holds the anchor up. No need to tie off, except to manage rope. That same pinch cleat hold the canoe when anchored. All the force of anchoring is kept dead center, very important in dam controlled flowage where water can rise rapidly and actually in any moving water.

 

I'm sure the same principles  and techniques apply with a kayak as well just maybe in more tame waters. We get right up to near the spillage of class 3 water in the canoe, sometimes using outboard motor power to get there. Having no keel to me is essential in a river, so when you get sideways there is nothing to catch rocks or even current, we glide over seams hardly feeling them. I would want that in a kayak as well if I were river fishing with a kayak. Our canoe has the shallow arch entry and exit ( bow and stern) and flat center section, very forgiving in rivers. Something with a sharp line grabs water and structure, and total flat bottom has no secondary stability if you do get it leaning. And moderate rocker affords steering in rivers, you can turn around back upstream in less than a pool length of water before you get sucked out into the next run.


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#29 tjm

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 07:42 PM

Dave G has pretty much described my thinking on the canoe. With enough line out the anchor pull should be mostly in the horizontal. My rivers only average 9'/mi gradient so maybe my "moderate current" is less than others' "moderate current". I have been interested in changing to a kayak, thinking smaller-lighter-more portable; but the information I'm getting makes me like the old Lowe better. This anchor problem is one I had not even considered.

 

For a diy anchor system this series is a good read:

http://flyanglersonl...er/ww101104.php

http://www.flyangler...er/ww111504.php

http://www.flyangler...er/ww020507.php

 

imo, the use of any "system" involving the anchor line running through guides needs be designed with instant break-away capability. The line needs be able to run out freely and untangled to leave the anchor and save the boat if something ever goes oblong.