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A Curmudgeon Moment


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Rocco

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:10 AM

Looking down the barrel at my 75th YOA, I more often than I care to admit find myself drawn up short by my own arbitrary, petty-minded, lack of appreciation for new stuff.

 

This has been particularly noticeable lately in my reaction to the mix of handsomely tied offerings in the monthly show and tell here. 

 

These new beaded nymphs that look to me like lacquered bowling pins blow my fuses. I assume they are a spinoff of the Euro-nymphing game and probably work very well.  But for someone steeped in the traditional effort to actually match -- or even make a fly look somewhat like --  an edible natural...shear heresy.  It sends me gibbering back to my Bill Blades Bible for comfort.

 

Such eruptions of old fartery are not consistent as I actually enjoy most new fly tying concepts,variants, and novel applications of old and new materials.   But they are increasing in frequency as new trends proliferate. 

 

Do I need a Tenkara rod or bamboo pole?

 

Bobber nymphing. Really?

 

Rocco



#2 Mogup

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:19 AM

With you Rocco ! It's amazing how many "Flyfishermen" can't cast very well because 95 % of the time they have been lobbing
a bobber and nymph combo all of ten feet for most of their time on the water.

#3 ben bell

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:26 AM

i once asked a good fishing friend why he doesn,t fly fish at all and he replied that he quit fishing with a hand line many years ago..lol.

#4 Bimini15

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:40 AM

Age gives you perspective, or that is what I hear.
To many of us these heretic offerings are all there is, it is what we know. So we need people like you to show us your perspective, that there is more to it, that there has always been.
I am not into beaded nymphs, but still apreciate your point of view.

Now, tell us how you really feel about mop flies... :)
Bimini15

#5 Flat Rock native

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:51 AM

I learned one thing here already, Rocco is older than me;) Sorry, friend


Kenduardo's Lure & Fly

Buffalo, Wyoming

Happily living in "Longmire's" county

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#6 utyer

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 12:55 PM

I am with Rocco on this one.  I may even be older than he is, and I have spent 50 years fishing older and older patterns which still work just fine.  By older, I don't mean that I am fishing with my old patterns year after year, but I keep using older patterns from previous centuries.  I have drawers full of all that "new" stuff, which hardly get used any longer.  For me, imitation is the goal, I can find plenty of ways to do that without adding bead heads to my nymphs.  

 

What I really don't get is using beads on  pupal or rising nymph patterns, these are patterns fished just under the surface, and adding a bead just defeats the purpose.  On midge larvae, a bead destroys the whole look of the imitation. While any of these just might work, they just don't look right to me.  


"We have met the ememy, and he is us." Pogo by Walt Kelly

#7 tidewaterfly

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 05:07 PM

Rocco, the older I get the more I see things on the opposite end since I don't do much trout fishing. With folks fishing the salt or for bass, all that many are concerned with is specs on rods & how far they can cast them. Nothing wrong with being able to cast the entire line, but most fishing of this type I've done throughout my life has been within 40', and that's worked great. It seems that's not how these folks want to fish. If they're not throwing the entire line on every cast, they're not fly fishing. blink.png

 

There's also this craze for complex articulated flies, that has spilled over from trout fishing. As much as I like experimenting & trying different things, like Utyer, most flies I use are older stuff that's been around for 40 to 50 years or more. Articulated flies & tying them is a whole different world, it just puzzles me why they seem to think it's the only choice for some of these fish. unsure.png

 

To make matters worse, one fellow had never heard of a Lefty's Deceiver, and never used a Clouser Minnow, and he was interested in trying to catch a bass. This was not an angler who had just started fly fishing either, and he knew what several of Kelly Galloups streamers were called. 

 

Maybe it's me, but why make things more complicated than they need to be.

 sad.png



#8 mikechell

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 05:43 PM

I seem to be just the opposite on many issues.

The older I get, the more I am into the newer things.  There are a few things I like "the old way" on ... like preferring complete sentences to abbreviations ... good instrumental playing to grunge rock and yelled out lyrics ... etc.

 

I don't understand or appreciate classic fly patterns that look like a rainbow on the hook.  I do admire the ability to tie them, I just don't see the reason for tying them ... they don't look "good" to me.

 

I don't see that any fly "matches the hatch" unless it's a realistic fly.  Mostly, they are mimics, not matches.

 

But then, like others, I never fish for trout. 

For me, anything that the fish hit on is a good pattern.  Synthetic materials last longer than naturals, which makes them better.  I grew up reading Science Fiction ... and fully expected self driving cars, antigravity drives and space travel. 

 

So, new is always better than old, when it comes to fishing.


Barbed hooks rule!
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Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#9 JSzymczyk

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 07:10 PM

I think I've been a "curmudgeon" since I was about 14.

I was in the local BPS Fly Shop the other day and saw many colors of "Sili Worms" from Wapsi. Fine if someone wants to use them, stick a FLY HOOK through one and go forth. Why are they in the fly tying materials?

BUT... at risk of excommunication from the fly fisher-peoples' church of righteousness, don't even THINK about going over to another part of the store and buying a pack of Berkley Power-Bait Trout Worms..... obviously.

I've been tying a lot of "Hair Jigs" lately, which are all the rage recently for colder-water bass fishing and seem to be regarded by all the Cool Kids as some new discovery. They are dead-easy to tie for anyone with a passing interest in fly tying, and most of the commercial offerings I've seen people raving about are almost laughable in their shoddy construction, but they catch fish.
Never mind that "Hair Jigs" had been catching (literally) boat loads of fish for decades before soft plastics rose to prominence-AND they were what I first learned to construct- before "flies"- because in the 70's and early 80's my Dad and his friends began having trouble finding the quality bucktail and marabou jigs they had been fishing for walleye and bass since at least the late 40's / early 50's.
I said I bet I can make what you want- the jig heads were available as well as the materials. He bought me a cheap but good vise, some materials, and there you go. I was 9 or 10.

Happy New Year

the gales of November remembered...


#10 tidewaterfly

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 08:53 PM

Joel, funny you mention hair jigs being the rage now & how they're being tied. I made a comment the other day on FB when someone asked about whether coyote was good for tying & mentioned I use it for both flies & hair jigs. From some of the subsequent comments you would have thought that hair jigs had just been invented. There's a lot of experts too on the subject. I have kids older than most of them. One fellow posted pics of his, and all the bucktail he used must have been from the butt end of the tail the way it was flared. I love getting older!   rolleyes.gif

 

I also made a comment on a bass fishing site earlier in the year about "Preacher Jigs" being nothing more than a Lefty's Deceiver tied as a jig. Of course I was told I didn't know what I was talking about. All I can do is laugh. laugh.png



#11 tjm

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:22 PM

color me curmudgeon, moderately

In truth many of the new materials and right now patterns are great to look at and often very realistic. Some bugs I see posted on the 'net look alive, make you reach for the flyswatter realistic.

 

But the complexity and expense of many make them something that I would never fish with. I always think of an old guy I knew in the '70s, His eyes and arthritis made him quit tying flies commercially then forced him to buy flies that others tied; ole Mike would carefully attach a store bought dry or nymph to his leader, hold it up to the sky for examination, then nine times out ten. he would drop the fly to the ground and step on it, maybe twist his foot a bit then examine it again before casting it. Some flies got two stomps. He explained to me that rough dubbing and a cocked wing would his opinion catch more fish, told me not try to make smooth perfect flies to fish with.   I think he was onto something. Most of my flies are suggestive and most are tied with natural materials.

 

On the other hand, I can see the hobby of tying flies just as art could become addictive, and experimenting with new materials and techniques can be a pile of fun. But, it is not the main purpose  for me, not any more than tying the ancient Salmon Patterns with archaic materials is.

Some folks fly fish and never tie a fly, so tying flies with no intent to fish is no different.

I can also see that every single tyer-fisher will  at some time come up with something that works with materials they have on hand to make a bait that works on their water, and may want to share.

I won't put down anyone's choice to try new stuff or new ways to use old stuff , though; I myself once bought a bunch of Swannundaze and one of the first Cardinelle kits long ago.



#12 JSzymczyk

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:38 PM

 There's a lot of experts too on the subject.

 

Of course I was told I didn't know what I was talking about. All I can do is laugh. laugh.png

ain't that the truth.   I love "the internet", I really do, and I tolerate some forms of social media BUT we are firmly in the age of instant experts.   I find great satisfaction in kayak fishing- I learned to paddle a canoe when I was probably 6, and have consistently fished from canoes and kayaks ever since, so well over 40 years.  The glowing screens and even the printed pages are absolutely full of info on the RIGHT WAY to do it , proclaimed by people who in the same paragraph say they've paddled for an entire season now... and have learned all the lessons. 

 

In my professional life I was given some great advice early on, well towards the middle when I actually began to accumulate some knowledge backed by experience- someone much wiser told me "never let yourself be called an expert- and for God's sake don't ever say you're an expert.   You may know more about something than anyone else in the room, but before long someone will walk in and make you look like an idiot." 

 

Anyway, I've made a lot of lures, caught a lot of fish, and paddled a lot of miles, but I'm far from an expert.   People don't seem to have any humility any more, and care nothing about yesterday.  

 

Off topic, my apologies. 


the gales of November remembered...


#13 cphubert

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 10:30 AM

Their will always be the next hot fly that many fishermen will need to have, tied with material that can not be substituted or it will not fish the same..... I agree with Rocco in principal and my personal style of fishing. But many do not and it keeps the industry alive and prosperous. I hear the next new style is tied on bone hooks with wool and kingfisher feathers, some new Chinese method innocent.gif rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif Maybe I'll start carving bone hooks it's almost fishing show season!



#14 denduke

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:16 PM

Most of us, I'm gonna say, in the back of our minds hold dear match the hatch, traditional, classic fly tying and always will. But fly tying is a living art/craft that will always entice creativity with no bounds! For a long time I refused to use foams, sharpies, etc. because it felt like "cheating". And lately, last couple of years, I have embraced just about anything! Part of this had come about due to the fact no fly shops around and "foraginging" actually works. The mop flies are latest example. Kinda funny to me and still have my doubts about a viable mat'l in the long run. It's all fun and this place and you people make it funner ....Ha
That's why I posted this, caddis emergers ....my conscience showing thru...wonder if we'll start seeing mop flies sold commercially eventually?????

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If you wanta sing the blues, you gotta pay your dues, and you know it don't come easy...RS
Due to severe budget cuts and economic down turn the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off...

#15 Bimini15

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:33 PM

Agreed.
We just have different definitions of traditional based on age and experience.
Anybody that was inspired by The Movie in any way knows about match the hatch as the traditional way. But younger people are far removed from that.
The same way you felt about foam, I feel now about fish masks and helmets, fish spines and other such things, but I am slowly trying them all anyways.
Bimini15