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Current Tags for This Pattern
/ bead / Black / Dubbing / peacock herl / Red / SLF / Squirrel /

the Jaded Hooker

 
tied by jlady
Fly Type: Attractor Pattern, Attractor Pattern, Dry, Nymphs, Salmon Flies, Weighted, Wet, General Freshwater, Miscellaneous,
Target Species: Steelhead, Steelhead, Freshwater Bass, Atlantic Salmon, General Salmon, Trout,
Recommended Region: Central US, Northeast US, Northwest US, Central US, Western Canada, Eastern Canada, Central Canada,
Material List:
Hook: original Jaded Hooker tied on a Mustad Streamer Fly Hook #9672, size 8, though size will depend on your quarry.

Tail: Crystal Splash, Golden Stone (Peacock color if more natural abdomen color used)

Body: Orvis Spectrablend, Nymph, Scud, Orange (or Dave Whitlock's SLF red squirrel nymph-thorax, or any tan rabbit dubbing if a more subdued look is what you're after). If you tie the more subdued version, use Peacock color crystal splash for wingfin and tail.

Thorax: Balled Peacock Herl

Hackle: Furnace Hackle to fit hook size, -- use one with well defined charcoal fiber center to emphasize segmented body.

Wingfins: Crystal Splash, Golden Stone

Eyes: Small or medium bead chain, depending on hook size, stainless or brass, depending on color choices for body. I also use black to indicate flies I've tied with lead wire underbody.

Head: Several wraps of red thread 6/0 to secure eyes and form cone nose.

Tying Instructions: Hook: original Jaded Hooker tied on a Mustad Streamer Fly Hook #9672, size 8, though size will depend on your quarry.

Tail: Crystal Splash, Golden Stone (Peacock color if more natural abdomen color used)

Body: Orvis Spectrablend, Nymph, Scud, Orange (or Dave Whitlock's SLF red squirrel nymph-thorax, or any tan rabbit dubbing if a more subdued look is what you're after). If you tie the more subdued version, use Peacock color crystal splash for wingfin and tail.

Thorax: Balled Peacock Herl

Hackle: Furnace Hackle to fit hook size, -- use one with well defined charcoal fiber center to emphasize segmented body.

Wingfins: Crystal Splash, Golden Stone

Eyes: Small bead chain, stainless or brass, depending on color choices for body. I also use black to indicate flies I've tied with lead wire underbody.

Head: Several wraps of red thread 6/0 to secure eyes and form cone nose.

1) Start thread on front 1/3 of hook shank, tie in bead chain eyes one bead chain eye diameter behind hook eye. Secure placement of eyes with one drop head cement.

2) wrap thread back 1/3 of the length of hook shank behind bead chain eyes and tie in the crystal splash. The crystal splash should be folded over itself 3-4 times, tied in the center and splayed in spinner wing fashion, keeping each wingfin opposite the other and perpendicular to the hook shank. (forgive my redundancy) Leave the formed loops alone for now.

3) Wrap thread back to the end of shank/beginning of hook curve to tie in another strand of crystal splash, again folded, but only 2-3 times, whichever is less than the wingfin fold, as you will double the forward loops back over to join the rear facing loops, once secured to the hook shank. Secure the doubled over crystal flash loops so all are facing the rear.
Trim tail in proportion to hook size -- use your discriminating judgement.

4) Prepare and tie in the furnace hackle. If you do not have furnace hackle, use ginger saddle hackle, but tie in a strand of peacock herl to be wrapped with it back over the body to form the segmented abdomen look you want for this fly.

5) Dub your abdomen with your preferred dubbing material over hook shank, and criss- cross wingfin section to secure wingfins in place. Wrap thread to rest just behind the eyes.

6) Tie in 4 strands of lengthy peacock herl right behind the eyes and anchor the length of shank between the eyes and the wingfins, then wrap and secure thread with half hitch in front of eyes.

7) Rotate vise and form peacock herl thorax to form a juicy meaty looking ball between the wingfins and eyes, beginning from the wing fins and moving forward. Some doubling-over with the peacock herl will be necessary to form a seductive looking ball. Tie off herl strands right behind the eyes and trim remaining strands.

8) Loosely wrap thread back over herl thorax and abdomen to form a consistent taper, making sure not to compromise the balled thorax too much. This will extend the life of the fly from the action it will receive. Return thread to the front of the eyes and half-hitch and rest the spool before rotating hacke.

9) Palmer the hackle and tie off behind the eyes. Be careful to maintain even abdominal segments the length of the fly especially around the wingfin loops.

10) Form the head by wrapping thread several times around eyes and wrap to form cone nose. Whip finish. Secure thread with 1-2 drops of deep penetrating head cement.

11) Trim the wingfin loops the length of the hackle fibers. Splay wingfins among hackle fibers.

12) Admire your work, and go stick 'em!

Originators notes and variations: I've tied in natural deer hair for the tail on the more subdued color schemes. It's attractive and a nice traditional touch. I've tried the same and then some for the wingfins, but the Jaded Hooker lost its charm.

The fishes interest in this fly, I believe, comes from the wingfins and the attracting quality of the crystal splash, let alone the fact that the fly just looks cool. (Cool being defined as both fishy and buggy looking as one might expect from a jaded hooker.) The balled peacock herl thorax is also something I believe fish have a hard time passing up.

Added lead wire wound behind eyes may be suitable for some situations.


Tight Lines,

Jay Lady
email for tying series photos if you wish -- [email protected]
Presentation Tips: This fly may be fished on submerged dead drifts, with or without lead wire underbody, or skated on the surface, if no lead wire used. Both techniques proved strike-provoking.


Additional Photos


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the Jaded Hooker

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