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Fly Tying

Futzer

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Posts posted by Futzer


  1. Hi Dart, I wish I could show you my first fly, it was a black gnat, and about a 12, but it was 1968. Long gone. Second fly I think was a caddis pupae using a rubberband. Dear lord, thousands of bugs later, so many memories. I remember staring at the bins of flies at the Denver company, and oohing the impregnated bamboo rods in the Orvis catalog, all long before I could cast a bamboo fly rod. I do remember my first flyrod caught fish. Trickle park res in Western CO, a cutthroat, about 13 inches, cruising the shallows near dusk, a size 12 White Wulff and only 3 casts. I will never forget that evening. I could tell my dad was concerned, at the time I did not know why. Guess it was his prized Orvis rod in the hands of a 7 or 8 year old. I remember having the confidence of a adult with that rod.... Only recently did I remember that feeling, I do remember throwing a good loop and about 25 feet of line on a 9 footish leader.

     

    Cheers, Jeff.


  2. I still buy medium brown, ginger, etc. and grizzly to mix it how I want. Cree is lovely, but tough to get, so I got out of the habit for looking for it. When tying with it, I was more dissapointed with the color results than using a brown and a grizzly. When I hackle with two hackles I tie one in aft at the start of the hackle space and one just infront of the wings. I wrap the front one back and then forward and tie off, then wrap the back one forward. I think I get a more solid finished hackle this way.

     

    Anyway Titan, glad to see you are tying!

     

    Cheers, Jeff.


  3. Very nice Shrimp, I am anxious to here how effective it is. I have been playing with flylipps on damsel nymphs and scuds, by cutting them down. Have not gotten a good trip to use them yet. Lately been too busy with work. I might add a little glow in the dark materials in the body.

     

    Cheers, Jeff


  4. Utah is a year round state, but Jan 1st is a traditional opener for me, and I threw a #18 grey olive cadfly with a #30 Futzer's navel lint nymph as a dropper. I caught one rainbow and one small cutty on East Emmigration creek. Even though nothing was on the surface, I still have to start with a dry fly.

     

    Cheers, Futzer.


  5. Hey Salty, You know I am a DK Pro. enthusiast, and they really stand by their products, they even have made me several custom items. I would really recommend tying on them side by side if at all possible. One thing I have never liked on true rotary vices is laying in tiny split tails on micro bugs. The left side of my right wrist hits the vice and makes that uncomfortable to me. Granted I had tied for over 20 years before rotarys came out, but I wanted to make sure you tested that for yourself.

     

    Can't wait to see some new pattern photos off the new vice too.

     

    Cheers, Jeff


  6. this is my first post so bear with me. ive never tyed before but have a real itch to start. ive looked around and ive seen alot of stuff just not shure where to start. ........i will say i really dont want to start with something ok (i.e. vise) id rather spend alittle more on something good dosnt have to be the best but higher than the middle IF NEED BE. ive looked at kits and wondered if they are any good? so im hoping for some real help from you guys and a point int he right direction.

    thanks

    scott

     

    Hi Scott, Welcome to the madness. There are many old posts in the forum with lots of good info on starting. In my opinion you have the correct outlook in starting. My best advice is to befriend a few shop rats at your local fly shop, nearly every shop I have ever been to is willing to let you demo a couple vices there. That is the best way to determine what you like. Also check out local tying clubs and lessons. Learn the basics from an experienced tyer, to avoid bad habits. Netflix also carries many tying DVDS.

     

    What type of flies are you interested in, that makes some difference too.

     

    Good luck, and be patient. Like anything it takes practice to get good. Repetition is key too, I like to say that you don't really master a pattern until you've tied 100 dozen of it. That is a little extreme, but the nay sayers usually have never tied that many of one pattern in their lives, let alone in one continuous order.

     

    And feel free to ask anything, no question is dumb.

     

    Cheers, Futzer.

     


  7. Hi Riddleyffo, Futzer tip, take the hackles and dip them in softex, I thin mine slightly. Make sure to let the excess drip off, so the hackle is lightly coated. And use webby hackle not good quality dry fly. Then lay them on a 1/2 diameter rod. I use our paper towel hold, when Mrs Futz is not looking. let them dry over night. The curvature will be set into them. Tie in with hackle points forward to the eye so it looks like a tiny satelite dish. Rib the hook rear of the hook with a couple wraps of copper wire so the butt end sinks slightly. Oh and the browns will slash at them, so on the downward swing and lift, don't set the hook, just raise the rod tip for a little more tension. They will hook themselves.

     

    Cheers, Jeff aka Futzer.


  8. QUOTE (Dubb J B @ Nov 16 2009, 07:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Welcome Dubb, You barely missed an Itsy Bitsy swap contest. I am a CO Hatchling that migrated one state West. Have some fun, check out the patterns DB and the upcoming Tyer of the year contest. All fun.

     

    Cheers, Futzer.

     

    Good to be here Futzer. The Itsy Bitsy swap would have been right up my alley. I mainly tie size 18-22 nymphs these days (trout are gettin picky in my neck of the woods).

     

    There is an astounding amount of talent and information here. I've learned quite a bit already. Thank you for the warm

    welcome.

     

    Yep, Same in Utah, lots of fisher pressure, keeps us going smaller and smaller. Take a look at the FTOTY contest this year, great fun. Lots of super class tyers.

     

    Keep posting. Cheers, Jeff.

     


  9. QUOTE (Dubb J B @ Nov 16 2009, 04:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Nice variation of a proven pattern. Thanks for sharing. I like your choice of materials.

     

    Thank you Ray. Its very durable too. The natural PT and herl tend to break after a few hookups especially if you've obtained sub standard materials (like I do on occasion).

     

     

    I twist the herl and phesant around the thread, stays happy through many fish. Not sayin your bug is not great, just adding.

     

    Cheers, Futzer.

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