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Fly Tying

mtyburski

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Posts posted by mtyburski


  1. I started tying flies about 8 years and started with popping bugs for bluegill. About 3 years, while fishing some ponds for largemouth, I thought of a fly that might work pretty good for bass and made it with an epoxy body, silicon legs for the rest of the body, and added to some eyes to it. These squid flies were tied a few days ago and were inspired by my older patterns using epoxy for the main body.

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  2. This is actually a Damselfly, related to the dragonfly!

     

    Entomology is an interesting science, because it involves the insects and terrestrials we use for this great sport! I have a Sony HDR-CX240 which takes great close-ups and may have gotten lucky with this shot. My experience with photography is in it's infancy! It was a sunny May afternoon, and the wind was blowing pretty hard. Glad to have gotten this photo!

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  3. The epoxy is molded around the entire body/eyes with a bamboo skewer! Then prior to setting, I turn the fly with both hands, until it gets an oval shape. I am going to do a step by step and video eventually! You have to hold the crazy legs together, with one hand while turning it or BIG mess! LOL


  4. Very glad that I finally got this fly right, after weeks of trial by error and plenty of sticky fingers. I started tying flies back in 2006, and my first one I tied was a sponge bug for bluegill, which turned out pretty good for my first time tying. There are plenty of great flies out there, tied by some very good anglers, and my buddy and I often trade flies or patterns. I have been using an epoxy body, with silicon/crazy legs for the past two years with my flies, and they have produced some pretty good bass last year. This fly is tied or molded around a medium to large offset shank worm hook, because of the longer shank, and have gotten into the routine of tying the eyes towards the backend. Depending on the size, weight, or whether you use a lead wire wrap, the fly sinks about 4 to 8 inches per second and is retrieved through stripping. The smaller one's cast great with an 8 weight rod, but the larger ones are ideal for trolling, which is a method I enjoy for deeper water and to take a break from casting.

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