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Fly Tying

SuperiorFlies

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About SuperiorFlies

  • Rank
    Beginner

Previous Fields

  • Favorite Species
    Brook Trout
  • Security
    22

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.superior-flies.com

Profile Information

  • Location
    Baraga, MI
  1. Clear Creek Caddis Larvae and some bloodworms from a few nights ago.
  2. Evolution X-Legs; Brown, Size 8 & Black, Size 12
  3. I'm constantly digging small hooks out of the bottom of my feet and toes... Sometimes that's the only way to find them after they have been dropped!
  4. If you have the extra time (20 seconds?) to tie them in, it can't hurt. As deaddrifter stated, they look cool. I tie them on my flies because, from a business standpoint, it's just as important for my flies to catch the angler as it is for my flies to catch fish.
  5. Triple Sec in the Salmon Candy variation.
  6. I usually use two 3-5 turn whip finishes and coat with head cement or UV resin. For smaller patterns where using head cement is more of pain than it is practical I like to use a similar method to one that I learned from Dave Whitlock at a fly fishing expo. He doesn't actually use any knot at all for a lot of his flies. Instead, before he makes his final wraps to finish off the head, he coats the thread with Zap-A-Gap and then proceeds to wrap the coated portion of thread around the hook. He just lets it dry quick and then snips the thread off close. I use this technique on some smaller soft hackles, but I like to add a half hitch or two in at the end before I snip off the thread.
  7. I'm very satisfied with the Loon Thin that I use as well as their other products (head cements, hard head, etc.). I will probably slowly transition (as my other resins are used up) to using Loon products almost exclusively. One thing that I really like about them is the lack of odor compared to other brands. The Deer Creek Flex has a terribly strong odor that, if it was not for the flexibility, would push me to stop using it.
  8. I have personally dried a few pheasant skins using Borax and have had no issues with them whatsoever. I don't mind that the skins are stiff. Some feathers are harder to pluck than others, but having them all attached to the skin as opposed to loosely packaged in bags provides a less messy way to store and use them. Also, as tjm stated, having insect repelling characteristics makes this method much more appealing.
  9. You hit that nail on the head! High temp of 37 degrees today and we are under a winter storm advisory for tonight... Tying season has begun!
  10. No worries there! Thanks! Brick and mortar may be a possibility in the future, but for now I'm focusing on online sales. The problem with having a physical storefront where I live is that the demand for a fly shop is extremely low and that it would probably end up costing me more than I would make. However, I do plan on continuing to expand my online and many of my flies are available in local sporting goods stores.
  11. It sure is a spectacular place to live!
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